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Discussion Starter #1
I am in love with my new Kobo Wifi. It is absolutely amazing! Much faster than the first model. I did learn something though I thought I would pass on.

If you add your own epubs to the Kobo (not ones bought from their store) it is pretty simple. Just drop the file in the root of the Kobo device (E: drive or whatever it shows up as on your computer). When you do this though you need to remember that Kobo has to update it's SQL database. After you eject the device it will give you a quick graffic saying it has done this and then take you back to your home screen (and sometimes appear to be frozen). The reason it is frozen is that it is lying to you. It hasn't finished updating the database. If you get frustrated and reset it with a pin you will get a fragmented data base and a whole lot of wonky files or the books you added may never show. Leave it be and wait (it can take more than 5 minutes if you just added a handful of large books).

Realistically I think the developers were hoping to let you get back to reading as fast as possible but the database application completely hogs the processor and leaves you with what looks like a frozen device anyway so they should hopefully fix this and leave you on the updating screen in the next software update until the update is done. It is a small price to pay for an e-ink reader that is open source and capable of handling all the thousands of free .epub books out there. Plus using Calibre you can pull rss feed versions of Newspapers and your favourite sites for free reading on the go.

I think for $149.99 the Kobo Wifi is the best gadget buy out there. Page turns are fast and battery life is great (as long as you are not using wifi all day).
 

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The Nook looked pretty tempting. My main issues were the use of the older e-ink screen since for me this is strictly for reading books and dealing with an American company.

Price was another. The Kobo I could walk in and buy at a store here in Canada for the listed Canadian Dollar price. The Nook and Kindle have to be ordered and shipped or smuggled over the border. Duties ad around $40 to the price last I checked. Even when our dollar was a par "exchange fees" also rob you. Altogether I figured a $149 Nook would end up costing me $200. Plus if my Kobo broke or just didn't thrill me I could return it to a store I can walk to.

The other downer for me was the whole American company/product thing. free Wifi access points with AT&T doesn't help me in Brantford or Toronto. I may have it at home but it doesn't help me on the go. I am also not sure about Barnes & Noble's commitment to selling books electronic books to Canadians. As we have seen with Hulu border issues can hold up content for Canadians.

I love the sound of extra features like web browsing on some of these ereaders but in practice e-ink is not really a very good medium for browsing the web. E-readers have such low power processors that some of them take a long time just to turn a page. It is slower to refresh and designed for text not detailed pictures. I think web browsing on an e-reader would be the like dial up on a small black and white screen. The Nook Colour and iPad get around the black and white with larger heavier LCD screens but then you lose all the advantages of easy on the eyes e-ink and battery life. For some that works just fine. For me I want to read books on a small light easy to read device and surf the web on a machine with a fast processor and a large high resolution screen. My Kobo fits nicely in my hand and weights less than a paperback.

My last big thing with the Kobo is that it is open source. Having a husband who is a software developer this is a big plus. I like the idea that even if Kobo as a company goes away the community could come out with new updates and tricks for it.
 

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Hey, judyz, thanks for the detailed review/comparison! I too like the fact that I can walk into a store and buy the Kobo, although my daughter goes to school in California and she could bring back a Nook at Christmas.
 
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