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I remember, 17 years ago, when 905 was split off from 416. Now, we'll have 6 area codes covering the same area!
 

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What I find more interesting is that the article notes they expect soon to run out of area codes, with only 16 or so left to be assigned in Canada...
 

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^^^^
There may be more elsewhere. Many years ago, before 10 digit dialing, all area codes had 0 or 1 for the middle digit and all exchanges had 2-9 for the middle digit. With 10 digit dialing that disappeared, so there should be 5x as many area codes available now and 25% more exchange codes (yes, I know some are not available such as 911, 411 etc). I don't think we've used anywhere near that number of codes yet. Also, in that article they mentioned some area codes would not be used, because they're already used as an exchange code in Toronto. This is not due to some technical problem, but rather to keep people from dialing wrong numbers by mistake. I wonder how many of those numbers have yet to be allocated to any country? That 10 digit scheme is only used within North America, IIRC. Other parts of the world seem to favour variable length numbers.
 

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Expectations are that the area codds will exhaust around 2038 at which time they will likely introduce 4 digit area codes.
 

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so there should be 5x as many area codes available now and 25% more exchange codes
Actually 4.5x as many. No area code with x9x format is being issued. This is for the future expansion. When we need more area codes, we'll go 4 digit, and xyz will go x9yz. Once all cut over, then we'll start allocating out of the non-x9xx space.


Also, in that article they mentioned some area codes would not be used, because they're already used as an exchange code in Toronto.
It's not that some area codes won't be used, it's that it's normal not to use exchange codes (the yyy part of the xxx yyy zzzz) which are within a local calling area for that area code. So there isn't a 416 647 xxxx in use in Toronto, nor 647 416 xxxx, 647 905 xxxx etc. Therefore to allow expansion all the existing 4 area codes in use in Toronto have holdback exchanges to allow the usage of the new area code without overlap.

Expectations are that the area codds will exhaust around 2038 at which time they will likely introduce 4 digit area codes.
This is one possibility, the other possibility is to go to straight 10 digit numbers. It used to be quite common for an area code to be needing to be split even though there wasn't many numbers in use in the area. The problem wasn't lack of numbers, but lack of exchange codes. Each provider needed an exchange code in each rate centre, even if they only had a single number in use in that rate centre. The only solution in those cases was to split the area code geographically, which is why we have 416 & 905. They don't overlap, so the now unused exchange codes can be allocated to new providers.

Later on numbers got allocated in smaller and smaller blocks, eventually reaching the state we have now, were individual numbers are allocated. That's when area codes really started getting full, and we got 647 added on top of 416.

There are plenty of area codes which were allocated on geographic grounds and will never be full, for example 307 (Wyoming), has a population of about 1/2 a million. If we were to go straight 10 digit numbers then we'd recover all of this wasted space, and avoid having to expand the number space at least for a while.

The advantage of not expanding the number space should be obvious - there is a heck of a lot of software and firmware which expect 10 digit phone numbers, and changing all of them would be expensive.
 
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