Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Despite what is being said in other threads, Netflix and other streaming services are not broadcasting in "standard definition".

https://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/streaming-services-reduce-quality-1.5512596

Netflix:
The lower bandwidth streams of Netflix programs should still deliver the usual quality of each plan, the company said, whether it's ultra-high definition 4K, high-definition or standard definition.
...
In a blog post last week, Florance explained that Netflix has many different levels of streaming quality for each title within each resolution tier. With the changes, Netflix is simply removing the highest bandwidth streams, which lowers the bitrate per second on the streams, he said.

"If you are particularly tuned into video quality, you may notice a very slight decrease in quality within each resolution. But you will still get the video quality you paid for," Florance wrote at the time.
Crave:
"Crave does plan to temporarily reduce the quality of streams on certain devices," the company said in a statement late Thursday.

The Crave 1080p and 4K streams will be reduced to 720p on Android mobile devices, Chromecast and Apple products, including its Apple TV devices, it noted.
The vast majority of broadcast cable stations still broadcast in 720p or 1080i AFAIK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I’m glad I cancelled the services if that’s the case. I only have Prime video left and don't really watch it as I got it free with the prime membership.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
This is an interesting development... why are they capping the bandwidth? Is it because their servers cant handle it? Because not enough bandwidth available?
Is this an internet problem or is it just a the streamer problem?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,404 Posts
@OlStatic the article says it's to lessen the increased load on the internet. This all started a couple of weeks ago when European governments asked the streamers to lower their internet usage, including Netflix, YouTube and Disney+ (which was just launching in Europe.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Thats what I am asking about.
If we have reached internet congestion with a handful of streaming services what is going to happen when the majority of people will undoubtedly drop cable and switch to streaming and every tv channel out there gets into streaming as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,193 Posts
^^^^
There's a lot more bandwidth available than we get with cable TV. TV channels are generally below 1 GHz over cable. These days, ISPs and carriers are moving to 100 Gb/s over fibre. With multiple wavelengths, that can be multiplied by the number of wavelengths. Also, everything that comes over the TV cable comes first via fibre to the node. So, it's just a matter of building out the capacity as needed. Many customers already have 1 Gb to the home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Have not seen any reduction in picture quality from Netflix or Prime. We use Bell services for internet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,598 Posts
Netflix accounts for about 15% of worldwide internet traffic. I've seen figures as high as 50% during prime time in NA. Guess what happens if Netflix use during prime time doubles.

Disney+ and Netflix have announced they are reducing their bandwidth by 25%. In reality, most people won't notice. It will result in the loss of some fine detail that won't even be seen unless an A/B comparison is done, but that won't be possible under the circumstances. It's vastly better than seeing stuttering or buffering throughout a show or movie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Personally, I noticed the drop in quality with YouTube and CBC Gem.

I haven’t use Netflix enough since they announced the changes to notice it.


Ed7789
Envoyé de mon iPhone en utilisant Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,598 Posts
The picture with Crave seems to be quite a bit softer as well. But they switched to 720p from 1080p on the Chromecast. Another factor is that the programming being watched has very high video production values. Still enjoyed the show though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I haven’t noticed any drop on purchased content through iTunes(I better not) and most all movies & shows I want to purchase I’ll buy on BD or UHD-BD so it really doesn’t affect me although it’s very annoying on the YouTube app that I always have to Jack the quality up to HD every time. I wish the app was like watching on my laptop where I have a plug-in installed that automatically plays the videos at the highest possible quality setting & skips adds.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,063 Posts
The results I've seen recently have varied wildly, by time of day and the title. The Tiger King would stream anywhere from 5-9MBps during prime time. The latest season of Ozark streamed during prime time, only yielded 1 to 2.5MBps and looked "washed out".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
^^^^
There's a lot more bandwidth available than we get with cable TV. TV channels are generally below 1 GHz over cable. These days, ISPs and carriers are moving to 100 Gb/s over fibre. With multiple wavelengths, that can be multiplied by the number of wavelengths. Also, everything that comes over the TV cable comes first via fibre to the node. So, it's just a matter of building out the capacity as needed. Many customers already have 1 Gb to the home.

At some point the backbone routers will need to be beefed up.
You say multiple wavelengths I guess you mean fibre the same as is used under oceans to get the absolute maximum bandwidth possible. I wonder how much of ‘older’ fibre links will need to be replaced.

Rogers assure me that my cable can deliver 1Gb. I am on a street with only 10 taps but I know the physical coax has not been changed for 12 years.

You probably know this, I don’t. Is the backbone routing done optically now or is the stream still converted to electronics and back again?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,193 Posts
^^^^
A while ago, I was reading about a Google fibre cable that had 12 strands (6 pairs) each carrying 100 wavelengths of 100 Gb each, for a total of 60 Tb! ISPs and carriers are now running some 100 Gb links. I have worked on fibre with several 1 Gb connections using Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing. That Google cable would use DWDM.

Routing is still done electronically, as routers are essentially computers that sort which interface to send a packet out of. The wavelength multiplexing is done optically with diffraction grating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
I was going to say "I bet this will lead to porn companies offering 8k"....a quick google search tells me I am way behind the times and they were already doing this 2 years ago.

It is just amazing how fast technology is changing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,193 Posts
It is just amazing how fast technology is changing.
The first fibre system I worked with, over 30 years ago, ran at 150 Mb! These days, my Internet connection is 75 Mb, over hybrid fibre/coax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
How expensive in later 80's early 90's dollars was that 150 Mb connection? It's all relative in my opinion, I remember my workplace wanting us to use a $5000 PC with an absolutely god awful piece of software for doing cost estimations for custom runs of products, it was useless and took forever, 5 years later my 5 person department became a 1 person department and I slinked off to greener shores seeing my days were numbered too.

I watched video recently of 3d printed housing, I don't think tradespeople really see how big a threat this is down the road but when governments start seriously talking about "Universal Basic Income" we better smarten up.....and quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,193 Posts
^^^^
My first hard drive, for an XT clone was 30 MB and cost about $500 with controller, back in the 80s. Today, I see TB SSDs are around $150 - 200.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top