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Discussion Starter #1
So here's the situation, i'm redoing some stuff in the basement.. wiring everywhere!

I have run some new cat5e lines no problems... but the ones that are in the houseare different!

Cable is Commscope 0509 cat5 yadda yadda

Orange
Orange/White
Brown
Brown/White
Slate
Slate/White
Clear?
Clear?/White..

Attached to the patch panel they are wired this way..

1 = white/orange
2 = orange
3 = white/clear
4 = slate
5 = white/clear
6 = clear
7 = brown/white
8 = brown

When I crimp in this order to an rj-45 connector, then plug it into my switch... the light comes on, but the actual computer that it's connected to doesn't connect... I plugged in another switch, upstairs to the same line and it just blinks really really fast.. at that connection point?

Any help would be great!

Happy Holiday!
 

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You should choose whether to keep using the 568B standard colour chart that is already being used on your patch panel:



Or else go with the 568A standard that is now typically used in new installations, but I personally prefer uniformity across an entire location. BTW these termination standards work on any UTP-grade ethernet cabling, so just make sure both ends are crimped exactly the same. Also, many new switches have 568A/B auto-sensing.
 

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I am not sure as to your experience with Cat5 termination but make sure your pin outs are proper. on the jack itself the pinouts go left to right with the TAB DOWN. If you are inserting the cables into the jack with the TAB UP you will never receive signals.

Are you using a termination plate at the other end of the cable? If so make sure that it is terminated the same way your jack is being terminated. Depending on the plate you have to watch the pinouts as they are all different. The ones I use have pins 1,2,4,5 on one side and 7,8,3,6 on the other.

Another thing to watch is to make sure that all the wires are being terminated inside the jack. If you don't have the ez jacks where the wires come through the jack this becomes very tricky and takes a lot of practice to get it proper.

If you know of someone or can get somewhere to borrow or purchase an RJ45 tester that would be your best option. This will tell you what the problem is with the cable whether the pins are crossed or you have an open connection.

Good luck

Tunksy
 

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Wonder if you can take some pictures of this? Also, you mention white/clear twice (3 and 5).
 

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Or else go with the 568A standard that is now typically used in new installations, but I personally prefer uniformity across an entire location. BTW these termination standards work on any UTP-grade ethernet cabling, so just make sure both ends are crimped exactly the same. Also, many new switches have 568A/B auto-sensing.
Actually TIA-568A is considered "old" as it's for crossover connections. Older switching gear (and hubs too), are not auto-sensing, and therefore require crossover cabling. Today's switching gear are all auto-sensing, thereby not needing crossover connections. When connecting any CAT-5e (or even CAT-6) cables to RJ45 connectors, it's best to use the colour code as stated above (TIA-568B).
 

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TechieFreak said:
Actually TIA-568A is considered "old"
And some day fibre users will laugh at us for using all this "old" twisted pair spaghetti! :D Down in the States 568A was still being heavily used right up to recent times due to legacy issues. For now though anyone restringing should go with 568B and maybe even put a label on the patch panel or central switch to clarify it.
 

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Actually, I thought 568A is used in new installs. Or maybe because that's what I'm using as I install the whole house audio. So it's new.:)

Crossover cables would use both 568A and 568B.

To the OP, you have two options and choose which one is more convenient. What is crucial is consistency.
1) follow the existing wires in the house
2) change existing wires to the new ones that you recently terminated.
 

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568B is the newer standard, and also what I recently used in my house (cat6).

I strongly considered dropping a fibre in each room, but I don't think I have a snowballs chance in hell of ever getting FTTH on a rural acreage. I can't even get anything better than DSL, the poor mans excuse for broadband.
 

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As long as each individual wire (plug to plug, or jack to jack) is terminated with the same standard on both ends, it doesn't matter if they are 568A or B. You can plug 568A patch cables into each end (patch panel and outlet jack) of a house cable that is wired 568B on both ends, and it will work just fine.

As long each cable has pin 1 wired to pin 1, 2 to 2, etc. (straight through) it doesn't make a huge difference which conductors are carrying them - although both standards are designed to minimize crosstalk in twisted pair wiring, especially over long runs approaching the 100m segment limit. I always use 'B', but I know Telus was still using 'A' recently on installations.

There's no need to re-terminate any existing wiring, provided it was wired to one of the standards (on both ends!) in the first place.
 
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