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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone have an idea of how much it would cost to fish an ethernet cable in an old house ?

Its roughly 30-50 ft in distance from the upstairs computer to the mainfloor living room. its a small house and the joists run the opposite way of the direction i need to go. all the walls are exterior walls.(its a small house lol)

Any idea on a price per linear foot? or is it all piece work? Im trying to figure out if its better for me to run a wire outside in a conduit myself or pay someone to fish one inside.

 

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I'm sure its time plus material.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ive reaserched that stuff and found that only a direct wire can current stream HD seamlessly. wireless and ethernet have too many drop outs to send the 40ish mbps consistantly to stream HD. So im stuck with a wire.

My second solution was to build an HTPC but runnign a wire outside in conduit is much cheaper then that. (plus id need a new wireless router my old one is terrible)
 

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Why do you need 40 Mbps? Are you actually streaming 30 GB movie files?

In some setups, powerline networking can provide relatively consistent 30+ Mbps speeds, whereas others will have speeds well under 20 Mbps. However, if you're only streaming 720p MKV files then the bitrates are usually well under 10 Mbps so that may be OK.

YMMV.

But yeah, wired Ethernet is the best. That's why I have Gigabit. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
most files are Variable bit rate so while the avg might be 10mbps a 720p file can peak at 20-24 mbps and 1080p files can peak at over 40 .

small net builder did a head to head in September with all of the current techs and found only a wired connection or a coaxial ethernet connection coudl reliably stream content (http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/mult...ures/31273-hd-streaming-smackdown-the-rematch)

even the newest 4 stream wireless n setups still can almost do that kind of bandwidth consistantly but cost upwards of 300bucks.
 

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Use Ethernet if you can, wireless or powerline if you must.

redzone: call around and see what people will price the work at. The most expensive part of the work might end up being some drywall repair, which would require someone to come back a few times to patch the drywall and put a couple layers of mud before re-painting. If you can do this yourself it should reduce your costs substantially.

Polk Audio has a excellent guide for running in-wall speaker wire to speakers, and while it doesn't discuss the using a punch-down tool on keystone jacks, etc, it is an excellent guide on running low voltage wire in your walls.

http://www.polkaudio.com/downloads/DIYTutorial.pdf

This past summer I ran some wires for both in-wall speakers and network jacks (11 speakers, 16 in-wall network jacks total). Fishing wires in exterior walls was definitely the most frustrating part of the work. Everything else was pretty easy.
 

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To the OP, what kind of heating system is in your house? If it's forced air heating, you can use the cold air return ducts to run cables through the floors, and then just under the baseboards along the floors. If the floors aren't carpeted, then it's a bit more challenging, but you can rip off the baseboards then nail them back down, which will require re-caulking and maybe some painting. But it's not impossible to run network cabling through an older house, depending on your determination. Don't forget the "golden rule" of running CAT-5e, no length longer than 100 meters (or 328 feet).
 

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I compress all my video using Handbrake to AppleTV (H.264,AAC,AC3) and a typical movie albeit 720p but looks fantastic on my 52" is typically 800Mb per hour of video. Easily streams on limited bandwidth.
 
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