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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,

This morning I woke up to my 5 year old yelling that my LC-46D64U wasn't working.

I checked it out... and it has the dreaded Power / OPC blinking lights. I picked this up in July of 2008. With my Visa extended warranty I am JUST out of the warranty period.

Just my luck.

So... my choice. Repair it, or get a new one.

I spoke to the local repair shop... who was VERY familiar with this error. It's apparently common. He said one of the boards is dead in the TV, and it is a MINIMUM of $200 for the part + $250 labour + HST. So I'm looking at a minimum of $500 to a max of about $800 for the repair.

A 46" TV these days goes for about $1200 for a good one, $900 for a cheap one.

To me it says new.

However... I'm disgusted that I'd have to throw away a TV that is barely 2 years old. Nice quality Sharp.

I'd love some opinions here... do I repair or get a new one?

There is an interesting twist here too... I'm trying to sell my house right now, and my TV is mounted over my fireplace. So taking it away means UGLY, which is bad for selling.

BUT...

If I buy a new one, I'm probably stuck at 46" because that is what my speakers and mounting bracket are spaced for. I was hoping to go 55" for my new house.

So, I ask my fellow DH.ca members...

1) Should I repair or replace?
2) If I replace, what should I get?

In the words of Andrew Krystal... "What say you?"
 

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I'd say leave the 46" hanging on the wall for show until your house sells (it looks good there and no one has to know it doesn't work) and buy a 55" for the new house. Recycle the 46" when you move.

Is there anywhere else you can setup the new 55" in the current house (basement or den?) to get you by until you move?
 

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^^^^
What they said.

Hmmm... better yet, list your house with a "free 46-inch HDTV included". :D

Joking aside, if your TV's seemingly common problem is like the bulging capacitor problem with many Samsung's in the past year or so, then just fix it yourself or some friend who is into electronics (I fixed mine for $10).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice all...

I think we are going to pick up the 55" and I'm just going to adjust my speakers for the short term.

It makes me sick to think about re-cycling this TV.
 

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It makes me sick to think about re-cycling this TV.
Agreed. I have tube TVs in the basement that are 20+ years old and work as well as the day I bought them. My last TV was a Sony 55" DLP -- died about a month after my 4 year extended warranty was up, with an estimated repair cost of $900. The tech said it wasn't economical to repair, which was sadly true. I did just what redzone suggested and put it up on Kijiji. Got $200 for it and the stand from someone with the same model who was stocking up on spare parts to keep his running.
 

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for sure on the estimate?

My 4 year Samsung went toast so all prepared to pick up another one but figured see about a repair. Contacted Samsung for a couple of places, picked one with a $50 evaluation fee. Few days later and 100 bucks more watching my TV again.
 

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I spoke to the local repair shop... who was VERY familiar with this error. It's apparently common. He said one of the boards is dead in the TV, and it is a MINIMUM of $200 for the part + $250 labour + HST. So I'm looking at a minimum of $500 to a max of about $800 for the repair.
I just re-read your post. $250 for labour does NOT sound right. That's equivalent to 5 hours of labour. Changing ANY board does NOT take 5 hours (I used to be a service technician in my time-off), especially not the way any newer TVs are configured.

Connection between one board to the next are connected with ribbon cables, a couple of screws here and there. I can see 3 hours max if this is the first time the person is doing it and 2 hours max if he really knows what he's doing (I'm closer to the former than the latte :D.. and no, I'm unwilling to do any repairs anymore :) )

Try going to a different place and ask for a second opinion (ie. quote). Unless they are working with CRT or RPTV, no board changing should take 5 hours.
 

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service time..

for that one...

from the floor to the bench, then pop the screws, 10 min..

typical service diag procedure, about another 10 min..
check some voltages and other measurements to make sure they are within spec before installing a new module.

remove and install replacement Module 10 minutes...

Watch the News over lunch.. ( Burn in )

that would be a typical estimate..
 

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$250 for labour does NOT sound right.
It's typical for an in home repair for large TVs. I agree that it's expensive. OTOH, someone familiar with the set and DIY repairs could fix it for $200 in parts.

I spoke to the local repair shop... who was VERY familiar with this error. It's apparently common.
If the problem is that common, I would be on the set maker's case. Free repairs are often available in such cases. Just be persistent and threaten to go public with the problem.
 

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I just re-read your post. $250 for labour does NOT sound right. That's equivalent to 5 hours of labour. Changing ANY board does NOT take 5 hours (I used to be a service technician in my time-off), especially not the way any newer TVs are configured.

Connection between one board to the next are connected with ribbon cables, a couple of screws here and there. I can see 3 hours max if this is the first time the person is doing it and 2 hours max if he really knows what he's doing (I'm closer to the former than the latte :D.. and no, I'm unwilling to do any repairs anymore :) )

Try going to a different place and ask for a second opinion (ie. quote). Unless they are working with CRT or RPTV, no board changing should take 5 hours.
$250 labour sounds like a flat rate and not an hourly rate. Even then, a shop rate of $50/hour is very low--the minimum shop rate for car mechanics is $85/hour, and the car dealers are now charging $110/hour. The cost of the board sounds low for Sharp. What is important with any TV repair is the final cost and how it compares to the price for a brand new set. The TV repair man has to charge something or he will not be in business very long.

Along with taking the set apart and diagnosing which board is bad, he also has to spend time on the computer to look at the schematic and parts list, and find the best price for the board. He also has to reassemble the set and store it somewhere while he waits for the board to be shipped out. Sometimes the board that fixed a set with the identical symptoms as yours, does not fix your set because another board or even the panel is bad. In this case he may be stuck with the board and may never use it.

There are 3 things to consider with any TV repair:

1) Was the set repaired in a timely fashion?

2) Did the repair last?

3) Was the repair cost reasonable and 50% or less of the cost of a new similar set?

If it was me, I would have repaired the set for $450 as a new one is going to be more than double that price.
 
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