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Discussion Starter #1
I've added a couple of rooms in the basement and ran some new cable, but had some issues so I had the Rogers tech in. He added a booster and replaced my new General Electric splitters 5-2300MHZ with a new powered 4 way 52-1002MHz Fwd (+8dB) / 5-42MHz Rtn (-8dB) splitter. Other two way 5-2300MHZ splitters were replaced with 52-1002 two way splitters.
I still have a couple of 5-2300 splitters behind the drywall. Do I need to replace those with 52-1002MHZ's??????

The tech says that the satellite type 5-2300 splitters only allow one way communication and should not be used with Rogers cable. Can anyone back this up?

Thx
 

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If the 5-2300MHz splitters are specifically labelled as two-way they can be used. It they do not say two-way then they cannot. There is no advantage for using 5-2300MHz splitters with Rogers cable.
 

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Typically a splitter rating of 5-1000MHz is satisfactory (the 2000 or 2300 MHz is not necessary), however, the splitter must be bidirectional to work properly with digital cable. Without bidirectional functionality the STB cannot communicate back to the head end, you can't get On-demand, and you will be shut down after about 3 weeks of "non-communication". So, although you don't need to use Rogers splitters, you do need to use the correct splitters (5-1000MHz minimum and bidirectional)

Useful post - FAQs, Search Tips, Optimization, etc:

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=57741
 

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It's possible that the OP is confusing a two-output splitter (one input and two outputs) with a bi-directional splitter (allows signals to pass in both directions.), and calling the two-output splitter "two-way".

As 57 correctly points out, digital cable requires a working return path in the 5-42 MHz range in order to allow the STB to communicate with the headend. In addition to needing 2-way communication for OnDemand, you also need it for viewing low-demand channels that are delivered via SDV (switched digital video service).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thank for the help.
But none of the 52-1002 or the 5-2300 splitters I have state that they are bi-directional.
Are all 52-1002 bi-directional?
Are all 5-2300 non bi-directional?
Is there a simple way to test?
 

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A 52-1002MHz splitter will not work with a bi-directional cable system, since the cable system's return path is below 52 MHz.

As for the 5-2300MHz device, generally, passive splitters (that means, with no amplification) should be bi-directional. An active splitter (that is one with an amplifier) is NEVER bi-directional unless it explicitly says so.

An easy way to test is to see if any switched video channels work. If you tune to a low-ratings channel in your area, chances are it won't work, and you'll get an error on the screen.
The other way is to look at the diagnostics screen of your Set Top box. If it says "BCAST only" , ( I forgot which field it is, but it's on the first diagnostic page of an 8300), it means you have no return path. You'll have to search for the instruction on how to enter diagnostic mode for your particular Set Top Box.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I believe the return path is listed as a separate spec on the splitters from the Forward path.
My MRA4-8 amplified splitter shows this as 5-42MHz Rtn, but all the basic splitters show no value on the units.
 
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