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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are planning to re-do our tv/den in and want to hang our 55" flatscreen on the wall - currently just sitting on the entertainment unit. Room is rather small, 12x12.

I want to hide the cables in the wall. Here are my questions:

-Do I need to use wall rated hdmi cables?
-Was planning on using this cable management system: Hide TV Wires Kit ~ Model TWO-CK ~ PowerBridge ~ In Wall Cable Management System - anyone ever use this and what was your experience?

My wife wants the tv mounted high on the wall, which would mean I would need to get a mount that would allow the tv to be lowered whenever we want to watch, so it is at eye level when on the couch. Is this wise? My thinking is that the constant moving will eventually losen - I prefer to mount it and leave it as is. Any recommondations?
 

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Mounting a TV high on the wall can lead to a literal pain in the neck when viewing from a seated position. If you search this subforum for terms like "fireplace neck", you'll find lots of threads regarding mounting TVs up high...
 

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All cables run inside wall need to be fire rated for wall or plenum installation. If using an outside wall, care must be taken to preserve the vapour barrier. Not doing so can cause water damage due to condensation. Another option may be to use a surface mount raceway. It would be visible but less so than cables and could be painted to match the wall.

The system mentioned gets very good ratings on Amazon. The usual caveats about Amazon ratings apply.

Most wall TV mounts only move from side to side. I found a few that moved vertically but they were usually either designed for use over fireplaces or for small screens. Their are also some ceiling mounts that have vertical adjustment but that would be unsightly. The other issue is that mounts designed to move require extra distance from the wall in most positions. That would be an issue if mounting flat against the wall is desired. One that might work is the "North Bayou Universal Full Motion Articulating Gas Spring Wall Monitor TV Mount F400 for LED, LCD, Flat Panel Screens 50" - 60" inch, support load from 30.8 to 50 lbs." There may be other, similar models available. TV wall mounts are usually quite durable but require solid mounting to wall studs. (I used 2-1/2"x1/4" lag screws into pre-drilled holes.) That's not usually an issue with wood frame residential houses but could be an issue with other types of construction.

I agree with 57 about the height. Mounting above eye level can be uncomfortable from a normal seated position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All cables run inside wall need to be fire rated for wall or plenum installation. If using an outside wall, care must be taken to preserve the vapour barrier. Not doing so can cause water damage due to condensation. Another option may be to use a surface mount raceway. It would be visible but less so than cables and could be painted to match the wall.

The system mentioned gets very good ratings on Amazon. The usual caveats about Amazon ratings apply.

Most wall TV mounts only move from side to side. I found a few that moved vertically but they were usually either designed for use over fireplaces or for small screens. Their are also some ceiling mounts that have vertical adjustment but that would be unsightly. The other issue is that mounts designed to move require extra distance from the wall in most positions. That would be an issue if mounting flat against the wall is desired. One that might work is the "North Bayou Universal Full Motion Articulating Gas Spring Wall Monitor TV Mount F400 for LED, LCD, Flat Panel Screens 50" - 60" inch, support load from 30.8 to 50 lbs." There may be other, similar models available. TV wall mounts are usually quite durable but require solid mounting to wall studs. (I used 2-1/2"x1/4" lag screws into pre-drilled holes.) That's not usually an issue with wood frame residential houses but could be an issue with other types of construction.

I agree with 57 about the height. Mounting above eye level can be uncomfortable from a normal seated position.
My Denon receiver, does not have HDMI due to its age, so I would need to also run an optical cable from the tv to the receiver. Does the optical cable need to also be the same type of classification to run behind the drywall?


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All cables need to be fire rated to prevent the spread of fire with flammable cable insulation. That may seem trivial with such a small run but it's to prevent fire from spreading from the wall to the room or the room to the wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All cables need to be fire rated to prevent the spread of fire with flammable cable insulation. That may seem trivial with such a small run but it's to prevent fire from spreading from the wall to the room or the room to the wall.
Any recommendations on best to get, and where, without breaking the bank...?


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They shouldn't cost that much more but may be difficult to find in a ready made cable. Can't say I've looked for fire rated ready made AV cables but they probably exist. Unterminated cables designed for construction use often specify the fire rating. The most common is probably a plenum rating which would be good for running in a wall. The best I can suggest is to do a search for the required cable with "plenum" as an added term. Contacting the seller may help as they may have more information on cable specs.

If all else fails, using a fire rated flexible raceway or conduit to contain the cables in the wall may work.
 

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That is the ultimate TV cabinet for people who have money to waste and want to hide the TV. I'd hate to see the price tag. :eek: Maybe mounting the TV on the wall and building a cabinet around it would work.

Maybe the cabinet could be put on tracks to adjust the height. ;)
 

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For as many homes across the world that are running any & all flat panel TV AV & power cables through walls, you'd think there would be a big increase in fires.
 

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It's not so much the incidence of fires as the rapid spread of fires that fire rated cables address. Using poor quality extension cords in walls could increase the incidence of fires. That's less likely with something like a TV than it would be for high powered appliances. Using any type of electrical extension cord in a wall is illegal. Don't know what the in-wall device in post #1 would would qualify as.
 

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When I built my house 18 years ago I ran PVC from the basement through the 1st & 2nd floors into the attic with RG6 & Cat5e so that I could decades later upgrade if need be. They made me put a cap (which I had to Dremel out a bit to fit around the cables) on each end so it wouldn't become a chimney in a fire.
 

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Well I think that if you have a fire raging inside your walls the non fire rated cable is the least of your worries.
 
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