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Discussion Starter #1
Camuz Montreal did a short but interesting article on the most popular music in Canada.

https://www.camuz.ca/what-is-the-most-popular-music-in-canada/

"Based on recent stats of music releases in the country, we can say that the most popular music genre in Canada is Alternative rock. It is a clear winner among all the music genres in Canada. A nationwide survey concluded that 21.6% of people love listening to Alternative rock music. Singer-Songwriter or Folk music is listened by 21.0% Canadians. Similarly, pop music (8.0%), Rock (13.8%), Rap (4.1%), Country (6.4%), Blues (2.8%), Adult contemporary (3.8%), World (1.8%), and other music or songs (4.2%). "
 

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It's obvious the author(s) of this piece have never heard of false equivalence fallacies (and are also pretty sloppy at producing graphs, mixing up the top two categories). Number of releases does not equate to popularity. One Drake release probably has more plays than multiple (10? 20? 50?) jazz or classical album releases. The article also doesn't take into account that most people listen to multiple genres of music.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I know; I noticed that, too. I said it was interesting, not necessarily accurate. Could generate a bit of good conversation, though.
 

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I always thought the most popular music in Canada was not even music, it was Talk Radio as most of my peers are grown up now and listen to Talk Radio on the Radio instead of Music Genres on the radio. or atleast this is my opinion so don't let it ruffle your feathers.
 

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Camuz Montreal said:
It is a clear winner among all the music genres in Canada. A nationwide survey concluded that 21.6% of people love listening to Alternative rock music. Singer-Songwriter or Folk music is listened by 21.0% Canadians.
I don't see how Alternative Rock music is the "clear winner." It's just 0.6% above Singer-Songwriter or Folk music. That could be within statistical error for the survey. What seems obvious to me is that there is no "clear winner" and that Canadians have very diverse musical tastes. I listen to about 10 of the mentioned genres in a typical week.
 

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I always thought the most popular music in Canada was not even music, it was Talk Radio as most of my peers are grown up now and listen to Talk Radio on the Radio instead of Music Genres on the radio. or atleast this is my opinion so don't let it ruffle your feathers.
This is like saying the most popular TV show is not a TV show but a movie.
 

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I don't see how Alternative Rock music is the "clear winner." It's just 0.6% above Singer-Songwriter or Folk music. That could be within statistical error for the survey. What seems obvious to me is that there is no "clear winner" and that Canadians have very diverse musical tastes. I listen to about 10 of the mentioned genres in a typical week.
I think the survey has little correlation with what people actually listen to. This is probably a much more accurate representation of the proportion of popularity between genres: https://www.statista.com/statistics/310746/share-music-album-sales-us-genre/ It's a U.S. study, but the Canada Top 50 chart on Spotify shows a similar pattern.

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Discussion Starter #8
I have always looked at the term "pop music" as a short form for popular music. Depending on how one defines "pop music", all of the above could be considered popular and therefor "pop" music. Pop music often borrows elements from all other styles, so to say pop music is only at 8.0% seems to me to be a contradiction of terms. I would think that pop would be #1 (whether it be new pop or old pop, pop rock, pop folk, etc.)
 

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Especially since everyone knows that Classic Rock rules!!
One thing I've noticed over the past several years is that a lot of young people don't listen to what's supposed to be their music. Just last week, when I stopped in for some pizza, I noticed they were playing some Gerry Rafferty, music from back in the '70s. When I complimented the store owner, he said customers prefer it. Another customer said his teenage son was leaning to play Stairway to Heaven, which came out when I was in high school! The grocery store where I shop also plays 70's music. I fist noticed this trend in the early 2000's when some kids at work were talking about Pink Floyd and Cat Stevens.
 

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^^^ This article tries to explain why: https://jacobsmedia.com/if-your-taste-in-music-sucks-it-could-be-your-parents-fault/

"The study also tells us something fascinating about the changing parent/child relationship. Nearly two-thirds of the parents in TickPick's “Music Tastemakers” study (64%) say they've tried to influence their kids' music tastes. That's a remarkably high percentage of Mom and Dad controlling their children's music programming.

We've seen this phenomenon a lot in Classic Rock settings, where Dads seem more gung-ho about making sure junior is exposed to Hendrix, Clapton, and the Doors. And oftentimes, this translates to not only hearing the music, but seeing it live – in stadiums, arenas, sheds, and auditoriums.
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Maybe it's worked. I frequently pore over Nielsen data and perceptual research for Classic Rock stations. And I often marvel at the appeal of the music and these stations among consumers well under the age of 40. They're listening to music originally released years before they were born. And perhaps much of the credit goes to their vigilant parents, many of whom were insistent they became familiar with “Dark Side of the Moon,” “Tommy,” and “Abbey Road.”

And the results continue to show up in the ratings. A story in Inside Radio today reminds us there are more Classic Rock stations in the U.S. than Alternative, Active, and Mainstream rockers – combined. As Nielsen's Jon Miller points out, “We know that Classic Rock has been and continue to be a popular format. It's the biggest rock format if you look at share of audience on a national basis,” continuing “to attract more and more younger audiences.”"
 

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^^^^
Not so. Back in my day, we wouldn't be caught dead listening to our parents' music. I still don't care for it. I grew up in the days when music really started changing. Beatlemania began about the time I started paying attention to music. That classic rock, as mentioned in that article, was the stuff of my high school days and later.
 

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The article does postulate it's a recent phenomena.

"The family going to see a rock concert together is a phenomenon that just didn't happen in the 60's. You wouldn't have been caught dead with your parents at a Grateful Dead concert . There were no parents at Woodstock. But these days, the entire family can enjoy the Foo Fighters on the one hand, and Elton John on the other."
 

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^^^^
Not so. Back in my day, we wouldn't be caught dead listening to our parents' music. I still don't care for it. I grew up in the days when music really started changing. Beatlemania began about the time I started paying attention to music. That classic rock, as mentioned in that article, was the stuff of my high school days and later.


Yes. When I was a kid my parents music was WWII music and us, from kids through to being teens would never have listened to it. Now however I have the 40s channel on Sirius quite often and the assorted classic rock channels. When driving at night I like the big band jaz, in the day solid old rock and roll...makes me weird but there we are!
I am a few years pre Beatle mania...but not many.


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^^^^
My parents were listening to post WW2 music and for the most part it was just pap. There are some things I like, such as Glenn Miller and a few others, but generally, not much.
 

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What various charts and services don't show is what people still listen to year after year from their own music collections. Top 40 radio is notorious for only playing recent releases promoted by the music industry. Their audience skews toward very young listeners as well. Even Spotify appears to be distorted by music industry promotions and its charts tend to reflect that. I've also noticed that, for all genres and eras, Spotify playlists tend to skew heavily toward a narrow range of popular songs from a narrow range of artists.

At any point in time, a lot of top 40 in any genre is forgettable. The only way it gets remembered is on top 40 oldies radio which serves advertisers, owners and the lowest common denominator of listeners (and is further distorted by Cancon requirements in Canada.) The best music stays popular across many listening formats, some of which do not show up in surveys or charts.
 

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^^^^
My parents were listening to post WW2 music and for the most part it was just pap. There are some things I like, such as Glenn Miller and a few others, but generally, not much.


Post WWII music until Rock and Roll was pap indeed. I think there was some good music on radio in the USA but I was in the UK with the BBC as the sole arbiter of what was played on the radio.


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In the post WWII period, the music that was produced and played by most radio stations was produced and controlled by the music industry. There were exceptions such as early rock and roll, but much of that was banned, especially in Canada. Very strict music industry control over what was produced and played on radio was broken down by The Beatles and the many rock and pop groups that followed. After that, smaller studios were able to produce and get airplay for their music on top 40 radio. The reverse trend has been happening for some time now. More and more music seems to be produced and promoted by a small group of powerful industry corporations and producers. The result is that a lot of what passes for top 40 sounds alike and innovation on top 40 radio is diminished. Fortunately, artists have many more avenues for producing and releasing music than the did in the mid 20th century so innovation is still possible.
 
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