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The kid is home from school and I need to give up the antenna room (GH with Al. foil reflector and top hat NADOR). But I would still like to see Ch.32 analog, so here is what I'm going to use.
CM Experimental Antenna Design
CE CH32 yagi
GW 1 1 0 0 0.25 0 0 -.25 0.057
GW 2 5 0 -4.7 0.25 0 0 0.25 0.04
GW 3 5 0 0 0.25 0 4.7 0.25 0.04
GW 4 1 0 4.7 0.25 0 4.7 -0.25 0.04
GW 5 5 0 4.7 -0.25 0 0 -0.25 0.04
GW 6 13 -6 -5 0 -6 5 0 0.04
GW 7 11 3 -4.4 0 3 4.4 0 0.04
GW 8 11 7 -4.34 0 7 4.34 0 0.04
GW 9 11 13 -4.28 0 13 4.28 0 0.04
GS 0 0 0.0254
GE 0
EK
LD 5 0 0 0 5.8e7 0
EX 0 1 1 0 1 0
GN -1
FR 0 1 0 0 581 0
XQ
EN

Just 10" by 20" up by the ceiling.
 

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Re: 5-Element Ch32 Hairpin Yagi:

Note that max F/B Ratio occurs on 566 MHz, rather than target 581 MHz (+/- 3 MHz), losing about 5 dB.
Every element in the 4nec2 file should be RESCALED SMALLER by a factor of about 566/581=0.974.
This does not affect the good SWR and has negligible Raw Gain loss.

If bonding the passive elements to a metal boom, you should also include a Boom Correction.
K7MEM Yagi Calculator says OVERALL length of elements should be 0.48-in LONGER than no-boom 4nec2 sim.
Note that there are different corrections whether going THRU the boom, on TOP of the boom or
somewhat offset ABOVE the boom. And NO corrections if using non-metallic boom (e.g. wood, fibreglass):
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?p=1172777
Boom Corrections are NOT applied to the driven element, since it is insulated & offset from the boom.

Note that these corrections only partially offset each other....perhaps you were modeling dimensions
AFTER Boom Corrections were applied (something done only going from 4nec2 sim to cutting metal)....

When modeling antennas using "as-built" dimensions, the Boom Correction is SUBTRACTED from
the overall dimensions for PASSIVE elements prior to entering into 4nec2. This is much more
critical for narrow-band UHF Yagis than Hi-VHF Yagis, which have much smaller corrections.
 
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