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There's a older thread on the topic in Windows, but since I run a Mac, I thought I'd ask here.

https://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/156-windows-computing/232346-questions-about-office-365-a.html

1. Is the only way to get Outlook now to subscribe to Microsoft 365? It appears that the standalone version doesn't have it.

2. If you subscribe to 365, what happens if you stop subscribing after say a year. Can you still use it, but simply lose out on any upgrades, security updates?
 

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Yeah, the office packages, even in the last 10 years I would say have really pushed towards the subscription model.
Let alone on the personal side.. on the business side with needing office standard, even at volume licensing is 300-400 per person. times how ever many employees, that adds up to a lot.
At sub 100 per person a year, your hitting the upgrade time, before you reach the full value cost.
AND, its also giving the PRO license in the end with 365 too (access to Access, etc)

Even on the personal side.
I have myself (and way too many computers to count) And my wifes, and my sons. There are 3 stand alone coppies to buy. which can add up (even say with only getting the home/student without outlook for I think $150ish?
I pay the yearly family pack for 0365. $99 a year, but also gives me 5 licenses, each of those can have a few installs (so i sell 2 licenses to my inlaws). So will take me 3 years to even hit the same as buying two coppies of home/student.
Also gives full access to the web/app versions of the apps and access them from anywhere. As well as 1TB of cloud backup (per account).
 

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When I was younger, I remember buying a copy of Microsoft Office which included Microsoft outlook, but I can not remember how much I paid, but it was certainly offered at a discounted price because I was a student at the time. But yeah you are right they are moving towards a subscription model, I am not sure I am comfortable getting the latest and greatest version, I am perfectly fine with an older version with less features as I am in the lower income bracket and struggling to make ends meat so any savings I can find really help.
 

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Open Office is a great alternative to a paid subscription to Office or a retail copy as it is free to use. It comes with a database program, work processor, spreadsheet and presentation program all of which support saving to office equivalent files. I haven't used it in a number of years but at the time, it did not include a mail client. There are other open source alternatives to Outlook and native OS mail clients with varying degrees of features.
 

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I use Libre Office (free) but this thread is about Microsoft 365, which includes Office 365. My needs are minimal so there is no need for Office 365.

Business costs and amortization are completely different from personal use. When I operated a small business, purchased software was written off at tax time at 15% for the first year and 30% of the remaining portion in following years. The software I used was upgraded annually with the upgrades receiving the same treatment. Needless to say, tax allowances never got anywhere near the real costs. Leases or subscriptions are a completely different formula. My understanding is that they qualify for a 100% write off. For a business that needs to keep their software up to date (or even if there is a lag for policy reasons,) leases, subscriptions or maintenance contracts (all essentially the same for software) are a much better option. They often also provide more in the way of support than purchases.
 

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Costs me $109 CAD for Office.. now Microsoft 365. Allows for 5 computers/accounts + 5 devices. Also have G-Suite, but use office for corp email. I guess it was worth it at the time, but as things wind down, I will probably end up migrating everything to straight gmail, even though I hate gmail for communication. Just what you are used to. I am incorporated so I take advantage of the write offs. Still, you have to spend the money.
 

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For many the online Office versions (i.e. online Word, Excel, etc) included with an Outlook.com account will suffice. I was a long time Outlook user but broke out of that habit years ago and would never go back. So I don't really understand the appeal/requirement? Would welcome some "friendly tone" feedback (not trying to start a war) on what still attracts people to the Outlook thick client? Except of course that it's better than the online version.

I personally prefer Gmail and use numerous G Suites and Consumer accounts (have since 2009 when it was "Google Apps"). Many who are against Gmail just don't know the full range of capabilities or how to be efficient in the web UI. Curious @pinto why you "hate gmail for communication"?

Finally, consider that most of the costs of G Suite or O365 isn't for the thick-client utils - it's for the back-end infrastructure. The fact that orgs no longer need Exchange Server (and everything that goes along with it: physical servers; admins; HA; upgrade projects; etc) and the related costs.
 

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@North_of_Calgary : Here are my comments:

1. I do everything offline. I don't have anything in the cloud, except for e-mails temporarily on Rogers/Yahoo Webmail, for which there is no alternative until I wish to get rid of the family's five Rogers e-mail accounts which we've had for almost two decades. Granted, people change e-mail addresses all the time, but I'd prefer not to.
2. I mostly work on my Mac Mini desktop computer I back up my computer files to a hard drive stored elsewhere in the house every week and to a thumbdrive stored offsite occasionally.
3. I have a Gmail account and I also don't like the way it (doesn't really) use folders. Had I never used anything else, then this would be acceptable, however, for me it's not. I like the way I can manage my e-mail files and calendar in Outlook. We've been doing so at work and home for decades.
4. I'm sure that for people who are happy working in the cloud, mostly with phones or tablets what you say is correct. For me it's not.
 

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As far as keepingg email accounts. Set up a domain for about $12 . Registering the domain at at least one registrar lets you forward the email to your isp account for that $12 cost (multiple accounts). Why not have an email.ca that is your name or something like that. Still using Office 2007! :)
 

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I use IMAP with email clients for email. It's cloud based but looks local. Messages can be archived locally. Most mail services support IMAP but some want money to enable it. My experience is that IMAP often works even when they say it's a premium feature. The big advantage to IMAP is that it will keep accounts synced across multiple email clients and platforms. I use two different clients on Android, Gmail for my Android account and FairEmail for the rest on another provider. Thunderbird is used on Windows. I use the web login occasionally for troubleshooting or setting account options. Yet another mail agent could be used with IOS, Linux or any other OS. Most email clients support multiple accounts so IMAP with a single mail agent can be used to manage transitioning to a new service or several email accounts used for different purposes such as personal and business.
 

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@North_of_Calgary : Here are my comments:

1. I do everything offline.
...
3. I have a Gmail account and I also don't like the way it (doesn't really) use folders. Had I never used anything else, then this would be acceptable, however, for me it's not
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Offline: sure if you want to work asynch then yes I guess you need a thick client.

Folders: labels can be leveraged in almost exactly the same way. In the webui you can drag and drop an email into a label, or drag and drop a label onto a message. The only real functional difference is that an email can be part of more than one label at a time which I personally never do. But we have many people who leverage labels and map those to a folder offline (mostly Outlook, some Thunderbird). Combined with advanced filters levering the AND and OR rules: over the years I have built-up several hundred, mostly from the "filter like this" option. So overall I think the Gmail web client is arguably more functional than Outlook for folders (drag and drop only goes one way in Outlook) but granted if you want to work offline then it's a no-go.
 
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