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I had posted in another thread, discussing someone switching from 5.1 to 7.1, warning the OP to be wary of 7.1, as I have to listen to most BDs in 5.1 if I want to use a lossless uncompressed codec. My AVR in my 7.1 system is an Onkyo 607. When I play a 5.1 lossless blu ray, my AVR plays it in the appropriate lossless codec, in 5.1 and eliminates my surround rear speakers. If I want to listen in 7.1, I have to use a compressed codec such as Dolby Digital EX. I assumed this was normal, but another poster said he doesn't have this problem... Am I missing out? Help? this was the other poster's response:

Quote:

I'm thinking that would be an issue with your receiver not the format. When I ran a 7.1 system I had no issues with expanding my 5.1 BD into 7.1 with the HD sound formats.
 

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This depends on the AVR in question. Some allow processing of the lossless codecs to 7.1, while others do not. It's usually a setting in the user audio setup of the AVR. Check through those settings and read the operating manual to see if it's possible in your AVR to add processing to the Dolby TrueHD or DTS-MA signal to give you the additional channels.

This is often not a simple button press, but rather an audio setup option. Your post was moved to the AVR section.
 

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I think the confusion stems from your comment that you have to listen to lossless using a compressed codec. wantmorehd replied that you can easily expand a 5.1 lossless track to 7.1.

I'm pretty sure - although I could be mistaken - that using EX or ES will not affect the lossless 5.1 track itself, but will simply "matrix" two rear-surround channels out of the side-surround channel audio once the lossless audio stream has been decoded by the receiver. In this case, you aren't hearing a lossy version of the 5.1 track, you're hearing the lossless 5.1 + matrixed rear surrounds.

I think this is how most (all?) receivers do it, and I believe this is what wantmorehd was trying to say.
 

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Thank you both for your responses! I checked my manual and sure enough, there is a setting in the menu to automatically matrix the rear surrounds with lossless 5.1 input. Problem solved!
 

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I would be that person. :cool: Yes that is what I was trying to say, but obviously not clear enough.

I've read that some receivers (I remember Marantz had this problem) you could only matrix lossless 5.1 -> 7.1 if you sent PCM but not if you sent bitstream. Something to do with the chip not being able to process both.

I'm glad you now have yours working as you want it. Enjoy.
 

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My Marantz sr6003 decodes the lossless and will matrix the rears. It pops up either dts hd mstr + neo6 pr ddhd + plIIx or ex.
 

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I've read that some receivers (I remember Marantz had this problem) you could only matrix lossless 5.1 -> 7.1 if you sent PCM but not if you sent bitstream. Something to do with the chip not being able to process both.
With the Marantz SR6003, the problem wasn't that it couldn't expand lossless 5.1 to 7.1, it was that the receiver could not both decode lossless audio AND apply Audyessey EQ-ing to it.

However, it could:
- apply Audyssey EQ-ing to to pre-decoded LPCM (which is why I use my OPPO to handle all the decoding); and
- it could decode lossy audio and apply Audyssey EQ-ing.
 

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With the Marantz SR6003, the problem wasn't that it couldn't expand lossless 5.1 to 7.1, it was that the receiver could not both decode lossless audio AND apply Audyessey EQ-ing to it.
Thanks for the clarification/correction. I knew it was something that stopped it from being able to matrix the extra channels..
 

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... I knew it was something that stopped it from being able to matrix the extra channels..
Just to clarify: The SR6003 can decode lossless audio AND matrix it to 7.1 BUT it cannot also apply Audyssey EQ-ing (regardless of whether it's lossless 5.1, lossless 5.1 + matrixed rear surround audio, or lossless 7.1).

The Audyssey EQ-ing doesn't have anything to do with EX/ES matrixing.
 

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My Denon can matrix and it can apply Audyssey, however, I gave it a try for a few movies and actually prefer whatever's on the original BD or DVD. I haven't encountered a 7.1 yet track, but I only have a 6.2 speaker setup anyway.
 

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7.1 is there any use for it. I see that there is not too many movies that really have 7.1.
In a smaller room, with well-positioned speakers, I can see how 7.1 might not be all that useful, but in a larger room, where 5.1 may not provide a sufficient sense of "envelopment", I think it offers a benefit.

As for availability, the list of BDs w/ 7.1 is growing (just google Blu-ray 7.1, or click here).

And, of course, you can always "matrix" 5.1 audio to 7.1 for that "bigger/fuller sound". :)
 

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I love having a 7.1 system even though most movies are not. Matrixing the sound to the back channels adds even more fullness to complete the surround sound movie immersion. Some people are even using the matrixed height channels that plIIz offers in newer receivers for even more sound up front. But it all comes to personal preference and enough space. If you have a smaller living room, you might not be able to place the rear speakers properly behind you for 7.1.
 

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Recent movies with 7.1 DTS-MA are The Last Exorcism and Buried.
7.1 is great for scary movies, creepy crawly things behind you and whatnot.
Also great for action movies, like the scene with a helicoper flying in from behind you, or maybe a big polar bear running up from behind you. :)
I agree with the others about 7 channels adding depth even tho the source was 5.1
My living room isn't very big, so i hung the rear speakers from the ceiling, angled about 45 down to save space. Works great IMHO. The rear speakers in a movie theater are always way up high on the back wall so it made perfect sense to me.
 
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