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When I first read about the CFL bulbs we will soon have no choice but to buy I was amazed at the issues involved in cleaning up after a broken bulb. Here's the EPA Short Version Cleaning Up a Broken CFL
Before cleanup
Have people and pets leave the room.
Air out the room for 5-10 minutes by opening a window or door to the outdoor environment.
Shut off the central forced air heating/air-conditioning system, if you have one.
Collect materials needed to clean up broken bulb.
During cleanup
Be thorough in collecting broken glass and visible powder.
Place cleanup materials in a sealable container.
After cleanup
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of properly. Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
If practical, continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the heating/air conditioning system shut off for several hours.
I've always thought that we should go to LED and bypass CFLs entirely, after all, who wants mercury poisoning. As it turns out, mercury poisoning is not much compared to what LEDs can do to you. Check out this article - LED products billed as eco-friendly contain toxic metals, study finds
Those light-emitting diodes marketed as safe, environmentally preferable alternatives to traditional lightbulbs actually contain lead, arsenic and a dozen other potentially hazardous substances, according to newly published research. …

“We find the low-intensity red LEDs exhibit significant cancer and noncancer potentials due to the high content of arsenic and lead,” …

Lead, arsenic and many additional metals discovered in the bulbs or their related parts have been linked in hundreds of studies to different cancers, neurological damage, kidney disease, hypertension, skin rashes and other illnesses. The copper used in some LEDs also poses an ecological threat to fish, rivers and lakes. …

Ogunseitan said that breaking a single light and breathing fumes would not automatically cause cancer, but could be a tipping point on top of chronic exposure to another carcinogen. And – noting that lead tastes sweet – he warned that small children could be harmed if they mistake the bright lights for candy.
I was quite relieved to discover that "breaking a single light and breathing fumes would not automatically cause cancer" although that those words do mean that it just might.

Isn't new technology foisted on an unsuspecting public as being eco-friendly wonderful. Maybe next time they'll include people friendly as a requirement.
 

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Oh no, not again! :rolleyes:

Please search this forum for real info and ignore the mainstream media, along with environmentalists.

The computer you used to post that has LEDs and other electronic components with toxic materials. (lead, arsenic, lithium, chromium, petrochemicals)

LEDs and fluorescent lamps are not "new" - both technologies are 40+ years old and have a good safety tract record.

Improving lighting energy efficiency standards (not to be confused with banning any lighting technology) has nothing to do with reducing pollution and everything to do with energy security - "going green" as it's called is just a silly fad which politicians and corporations have capitalized on. Energy efficiency standards were put into place long before anything was concerned about so called "global warming".

I was quite relieved to discover that "breaking a single light and breathing fumes would not automatically cause cancer" although that those words do mean that it just might.
Have you ever handled a single LED? They're nearly indestructible.
 

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There was an entire thread on this somewhere.

Long story short:

If you eat canned tuna you're exposed to FAR more mercury than you'll ever be from a single CFL break.

If you use unshielded CFLs and fear UV damage, you'd better have your windows sealed up and never go outside, cause the sun gives off a million times more radiation.

The best solution, however, is LEDs.
They have incredible life, use even less power, and as txv pointed out, are solid state - they are impossible to 'break' with household use. (A hammer to them is another story..)

Also, the new laws don't force you to use CFLs or LEDs. Only the least efficient incandescents (i.e. tungsten). Many halogens are efficient enough for the new standards.
 

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