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I have been using the same videotron email address ([email protected]) for over a decade. It would be very inconvenient for me to change it but i'm also thinking of dropping Videotron's internet service to save some money. Is it possible to continue using that email address or do they delete them when you are no longer a customer?
 

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I can't say for Videotron but with most Canadian ISP's, once you cancel service, you lose your email address.

Best thing to do is move to a 3rd party email (I recommend Google) and start letting everyone know that is your new email address. Stop using your old email address ASAP and everytime you get an email on the old address, you notify the person or company.
 

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Gmail is accessible with POP3 so mail can be read locally. It's actually a pretty good option. Just be sure to change all accounts tied to an email address since they could become unusable if the registered email address cannot be reached.
 

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I recommend to everyone to never use @ISP email addresses.
it's just like signing a 3-year cell contract - another thing to keep you tied down. Even if you have no choice(e.g. you move from videotron to shaw land), you have to notify everyone eventually, so why even start down that path?

I recommend gmail to everyone, since it can either check POP3 for you, or be accessed via POP3 for those who prefer outlook.

Another option is if you have your own domain, use @yourdomain addresses.

I know this doesn't help you much as you've been using it for 10 years, though :(

As others have said, begin the transition now, until you're sure everyone has your new address. And make it an independent one! Not @yournewISP! :p
 

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Unfortunately I may find myself in the same boat.

It's a PITA because I've had my ISP email address for many years and when I got my gmail address it was late enough that I got a crappy one. :(
 

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Gmail is the way everyone should go. An easy way to migrate is set-up a Gmail account and then notify your contacts. Of course many contacts will neglect to make the change so I suggest using your current email Vacation responder setting to return a message saying. Please update your address book to reflect my new Gmail address [email protected]

This brief message will be sent to anyone still using your old address. I would also set a rule in your inbox that routes emails from the old account to be routed to a seperate folder so you can see who has not updated.

Usually within 1-2 months everyone has migrated and you are now free to change ISPs with no fear of your email changing.

For some DSL users who are unable to use Bell's SMTP servers when awany from home will be glad to know Gmail provides free POP/IMAP service so you can use Outlook, Thunderbird or Windows Mail.

Enjoy
 

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The only caveat with Gmail is that everything ends up in the gigantic Google database that is subject to US privacy laws (aka no privacy.) For confidential information, such as business communications, it might be a good idea to use an email address from Canadian company that guarantees privacy. Email addresses are available for as little as $10/yr.
 

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You do realize that Gmail is a "Beta" still? They could discontinue or charge for service at any time. They are cutting back some of their other free services (GOOG-411 the latest), so you never know.

Spring for a domain ($8 a year) which usually comes with an email address or two. Start forwarding your emails to it now, and then in 3 months time make the cut.
 

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ScaryBob: where are you getting that from? You mustn't be a Google Apps customer because they do provide privacy statements. If you go to their Infrastructure security page they go into details under sections like: "Dedicated to keeping your data safe, secure & private". There's further FAQs about their storage, privacy, and ownership of the data.

I agree with the comments of this thread and recommend no-one ever uses an ISP email address. Your own domain only costs about $8 or $9 per year and depending on who you can use there you can setup a pretty decent number of email mailboxes, distribution lists, and aliases. For that price everyone should have their own family domain. Or at the very least a consumer Gmail account.
 

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You do realize that Gmail is a "Beta" still? They could discontinue or charge for service at any time.
Mozza: you also seem to be one that doesn't follow Google closely. Then left Beta a year and a half ago. I had to look it up on Wikipedia and it says July 9, 2009. And why did they finally have to leave beta...... the answer is so they could start charging for it.

You also need to look at which they consider the "core components" with they support and service levels.
 

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they do provide privacy statements.
No doubt. But any data stored or processed by a US company is still subject to US law and the US Patriot Act. A law which protects nobody's privacy, especially not that of Canadians and other foreign (to the US) nationals.
 

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Unless you're employing email encryption right now, I can almost guarantee the US has had access to every email you've sent as it bounces around the internet.

Also, your @rogers and @bell email addresses are hosted by Yahoo and Microsoft, respectfully.
So, I'm hoping you're using your own domain on a Canadian server and employing encryption key based emails if you're so worried ;)
 

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when I got my gmail address it was late enough that I got a crappy one
If you don't mind paying about $10/year, you can get your own domain name on gmail and create all the accounts you want. You also get a DNS service for that domain name and use of Google apps etc.
 

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ScaryBob: The words you used is "no privacy". I'm contesting that and again asking you if you've ever been a Google Apps customer and reviewed their privacy statements. There's plenty of privacy policies around gmail. And as others have pointed out if you're really worried about the US Patriot Act then yo better not be sending any emails at all or using very many web services.
 

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When it comes to privacy and security then I really think everyone needs to take a step back and evaluate reasonableness. I hate to sounds like Eric Schmit but I do when I ask: what are you sending in your personal or business emails for that matter that you're worried about the US Patriot Act.

But you should want a reasonable amount of security and privacy and there's no doubt in my mind that Google Apps has that covered for both personal and business uses.

And back to the original spirit of this thread, the concern was about loosing an ISP provided email address. And the recommendation is to never use an ISP email (to the OP call it a "lessoned learned"), and instead use a service like Google or Hotmail. And even if you do buy your own domain for $10 you still need someone to host it for you. And the two biggest providers of free mail hosting for your domain are Microsoft and Google.
 

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And a final comment (I'm trying to to let us go too far OT): do you know that almost all online providers including those in Canada touch the Amazon S3 or even EC2 in some capacity. There's a pretty good chance that the OPs videotron email is reaching Amazon in one way or another (some use it operationally, others for BU, others for DR). And S3 and EC2 is served out of their three US based data centers (I think it's one west coast and two on the east or maybe it's the other way around) and hence possibly your videotron email could be as easily subjected to the Patriot Act as your Hotmail or Gmail. (The banking vertical is the only one that I know of that can't touch S3 because of Canadian regulations.)

ScaryBob: you mentioned "from Canadian company that guarantees privacy" - care to elaborate on where you can find that company and what the terms of their guarantee and privacy statement is? Does it mention that it in no way is going to touch the US internet backbone or services like S3?

I guess if you want to ensure you're protected from the US you also wouldn't use Facebook, Twitter, Google Search, bing, Mapquest, etc, etc. I think your technology would consist of two cans and a piece of string. I'm pretty sure you're safe from the US government with that. :cool:

Bottom line is that Google is certainly quite secure, preserves privacy, and is absolutely ready for prime-time when it comes to business email. They've quoted over 3000 businesses converting per day. Over two million businesses so far with company sizes up to 20,000 users. If there was a major privacy issues withe Gmail I would think that someone would have brought it up by now.

And when it comes to consumer accounts like what we're suggesting the OP should have used all along, there's hundreds of millions of gmail, hotmail, and yahoo mail users all around the world with data touching US servers.
 

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Posts deleted.

The subject of the thread is

Keeping email address after dropping internet service?

Any future off-topic posts will be removed and infractions issued.
 

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Get a .ca

Go for it. Get a .ca and host a web site and forwarding or multiple emails for less than $30/year and "never" change your email again.
As someone else mentioned. I use a service which is $20US a year and people could partner and host up to 5 domains for that account so about $10 for the domain registry and about 4-5 for domain and email hosting.
 

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After reading this thread I think I'm ready to start the switch. A lot of people mention gmail as a good option, what are the thoughts with hotmail or live.ca (same thing). I think my live.ca address is easier to remember than my gmail ([email protected] vs. [email protected]). Any thoughts on either?
 
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