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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I'm getting framed.

The DW for some reason still likes analogue output from my digital images. I'm quite happy viewing them on the computer but she insists and usually get what she wants. So I recently upgraded my Photo printer to an Epson R2880. Apparently my old Epson just didn't do a good enough job on 4x6s ;). I should have bought a R3880 but that's a different story (difference in price is paid for after 3 ink set changes due to less expensive higher volume ink cartridges on R3880). So I've been printing these mind blowing 13x19" prints. Now I want to display them but not permanently. We have limited real estate left on our walls but Management informs me that any mounting method has to look "acceptable".

My permanent stuff I get framed at a local store but the framer cant/wont do removable frames. I've played with:

Using 3M Photo Adhesive to mount on foam core (sticky & messy)
Buying a 16x20" frame and getting a mat cut to 11 x 17 (or some such variant).

I found metal build your own frames at Michael's with 13" and 19" lengths but have to get the Glass cut.

Any suggestions?
 

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Ask them to cut your glass at Michaels. I would. No shame. :) Or if you're feeling too embarassed to do that, just ask to buy a new piece of custom glass, maybe non-glare even, for that old frame they already made for you (they did do that way back, right?). They really soak you for the mats there IME, but can do a respectable job and the glass/mats are/were of decent-enough quality (I have one mat from them that's over 20 years old and it hasn't yellowed at all). Good luck.

P.S. One thing to be careful of though: some of those DIY metal frame sets (at Michaels) use incredibly thin glass, which makes it a bit awkward to cut by typical means. Normal framing glass Michaels supplies is thicker and *may* not fit in their DIY frames very well, least with the backing fibreboard thickness they supply.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ask them to cut your glass at Michaels. I would. No shame. :) Or if you're feeling too embarassed to do that, just ask to buy a new piece of custom glass, maybe non-glare even, for that old frame they already made for you (they did do that way back, right?). They really soak you for the mats there IME, but can do a respectable job and the glass/mats are/were of decent-enough quality (I have one mat from them that's over 20 years old and it hasn't yellowed at all). Good luck.
While at Michaels I got a quote on some custom frames as they were 55% off. The price was almost twice as much as my most recent custom framing job from my usual supplier which was for a custom frame & matting with museum glass & all Acid free matting & backing for a 8 1/2 x 11" Daugerre print by Karsh. I get the glass from my local supplier but the problem is with using the 13 x 19 frames is there is no matting so there will be ghosting on the inside of the glass from the Epson inks off-gassing.
P.S. One thing to be careful of though: some of those DIY metal frame sets (at Michaels) use incredibly thin glass, which makes it a bit awkward to cut by typical means. Normal framing glass Michaels supplies is thicker and *may* not fit in their DIY frames very well, least with the backing fibreboard thickness they supply.
The frame pieces I got had no glass.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do not Ikea have a selection of inexpensive but ok looking frames in many sizes.
Yeah, stopped at IKEA. All their frames are weird sizes (probably European) with matting cut for their artwork which, again, is all weird sizes.
 

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I noticed the same thing.

I had a frame custom made. It cost me $100. :mad: The print was $1. :rolleyes:

The store noticed that I was a repeat customer and made a special effort to make the framing perfect.
 

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This may or may not be directly related to what you're asking, but with regards to mounting methods if you're short on wall space (like I am), here's a suggestion: since you probably have more prints, posters or other pieces of art to hang than you have wall space for, consider installing a picture-hanging system for a section of your wall (along a hallway, for instance). It'll give you the flexibility of mixing-and-matching everything in your growing collection as often as you want.

There are many variants, but in most cases, it consists of mounting some type of rail at the top of the wall. You can then buy a variety of accessories i.e. detachable hooks, adjustable cables, chains, anchors, etc. that attach to the railing, on which you ultimately hang everything.

Here's a small example to what I've done on a section of my wall:







The rail can be painted to match the wall. I know that seeing the cable will bother some people (that was my biggest concern), but I actually found it not at all obtrusive. Most importantly, none of my visitors seem to have an issue with it.
 

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Yes, you are right that Michaels is expensive. Even with their (continuous) 50% off on framing (so really, their "normal" price) they are still expensive. For their cheaper DIY stuff though (typically a regular 40% off) the "quality" is usually better than what you get at many other places for similar $.

If all you want is glass, I am sure they would sell you a cut piece (at a high undiscounted price...). You might want to check local (including web) ads, framing is the type of thing many people do in their homes so likely a lot cheaper (for the cut glass).

An example of the last thing I took to Michaels for framing: an uncut sheet of old-style 50x$5 bills. This is not that big, much smaller than most posters anyways, but not tiny either. They wanted almost $250 to frame it with "regular" glass, and the mat margins were on the smaller side to help keep the cost down. My comment to them was "do you mean you'd ask $500 to frame this at regular prices?". I thought it was ridiculous. The framed sheet was meant to be a joke, $250 is getting expensive for just a joke, even after the $250+ I paid for the sheet (at least that is spendable in an emergency LOL). I stick these framed banknote sheets in various hobby areas, denomination reflecting how much money I wasted on that particular hobby. :) They are also somewhat decorative in that they do attract attention as most people haven't seen them. [don't get any ideas either, I only have $1s, $2s and $5s LOL]
 

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The last piece of glass I had cut was for a 30 inch by 24 inch frame. Got it from a window and door company - $25. Now this is standard glass, non-glare or uv-protected will be higher.

Another place to check is auto glass companies, they also do many types of glass work.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the suggestions. I really like the wall mounting system but the DW finds it too "80s" whatever that means :-0

I took the metal frame from Michaels with the foam-core back that I made to my framer. He didn't like it - then when I told him what I paid said he could make the same thing with better materials for 2/3 of the price including glass! Long story short, Luis is originally from El Salvador and his English is much better than my Spanish and he can make me frames with removable backs and at a reasonable price. After we talked he cut me a piece of nice (i.e. low reflectance) glass on the spot, took the frame apart, reassembled it with a new piece of foam core & some better hardware and tried to charge me $7. We haggled and settled on $10. So I spent 3 or 4 hours at IKEA, Lee Valley Tools, Michaels etc. I'm sticking with the framer I know will do good work at a reasonable price and am having him make me up 4 21" x 15" wood frames with a removable back and a 2" mat.
 

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Good for you. Again it underlines the ridiculous prices that commercial store-front framing ops typically charge for relatively simple jobs.

[P.S. I haven't heard anybody use the term "Skyline" since the 70s. So if I said I used to live (and mother still does) right on that nasty curve on BR you'd know where I meant. :)]
 

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...[P.S. I haven't heard anybody use the term "Skyline" since the 70s. So if I said I used to live (and mother still does) right on that nasty curve on BR you'd know where I meant. :)]
Yes, good old Skyline Cablesystems assimilated by Ted back in 1991. You'll have to give me another clue as to "BR"
 

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Discussion Starter #13
...having him make me up 4 21" x 15" wood frames with a removable back and a 2" mat.
Update,

I finally placed some pictures in the frames which were ready before Christmas. We settled on 16" x 22" frames with a 2" matt. This allows me to print a 12"x18" print on 13" x 19" with a 1/2" border thus maintaining the 2x3 aspect ratio from the camera. The mat is hinged to another piece of mat with linen tape and my framer installed plastic mount corners onto the backing so now I can change prints at will. They meet the wife test for tastefulness & decor and I can look at some of the prints in my typical viewing conditions.
 

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GordonB,

I also have a 13x19" printer.

I use 18x24" mats for my prints. I print full frame/borderless. I believe 18x24" is a frame size that Michaels stocks.

Google Frame Destination. That is where I buy my matts. I have a crazy supply of mats now. Probably over 60. in 3 neutral colours.

Pennies compared to custom matting.

P
 

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Discussion Starter #15
GordonB,

I also have a 13x19" printer.

I use 18x24" mats for my prints. I print full frame/borderless. I believe 18x24" is a frame size that Michaels stocks.

Google Frame Destination. That is where I buy my matts. I have a crazy supply of mats now. Probably over 60. in 3 neutral colours.

Pennies compared to custom matting.

P
Thanks P,

But my cost with a custom frame, backings, glass & matting was still less than what a standard 18x24 frame from Michaels retails for.

It's not archival matting or glass but these are temporary. Any images I want permanently framed I will still spend the extra money and go to my local framing store for as the owner gives me exactly what I want and with his years of experience can give me useful advice.
 
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