Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It's says we won't be able to pick up signals next year when we go all digital. Is this true, even with an HD antenna? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,007 Posts
Where and who is the IT that you refer to.?

The simple answer is that with the correct equipment you will continue to pick up Digital Terrestrial Signals including HD after the switch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Sorry, I'm new. I just read this article. I've been thinking of cancelling my cable but am now hesitant to do so because of unknowns. Can anyone recommend a good indoor HD antenna that will work with my TV and can easily be set up (I'm not technical) and will work beyond whatever the CRTC is talking about? My TV is a Samsung LN52750A model. Here's the link I mentioned. Thanks.

http://www.financialpost.com/news/Almost+million+households+ready+digital/3287333/story.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Are you referring to the CBC article

Friday, July 16, 2010 | 3:54 PM ET

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/consumer/story/2010/07/16/con-digital-television.html#ixzz0tskW1cD2


With analog TV signals to be shut down in most Canadian cities in just over a year, nearly one million Canadians aren't ready for the switch, says the CRTC.

Starting Aug. 31, 2011, Canadian television sets that rely on antennas or rabbit ears will need to be equipped with a digital converter.Starting Aug. 31, 2011, Canadian television sets that rely on antennas or rabbit ears will need to be equipped with a digital converter. (iStock)On Aug. 31, 2011, television stations in capital cities, areas with a population over 300,000 people, and those served by more than one station will be forced to broadcast only digital signals.

That means people who get their TV programming using an antenna or rabbit ears will need to purchase a converter to continue watching TV — unless they have a digital-ready set with a built-in converter.

The digital converter boxes cost about $75 for each television.

In smaller markets, some local stations may not convert to digital and instead deliver their services solely on cable and satellite.

The CRTC says the switch is intended to free up more broadcasting spectrum as digital signals use less room than analog.

Digital also delivers a better picture and sound quality than analog.

The switch may also mean some stations will move to different channel positions.

A national consumer education campaign outlining the changes and what they mean to consumers is expected to be launched in the spring of 2011.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/consumer/story/2010/07/16/con-digital-television.html#ixzz0tskQ0VzS
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,505 Posts
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top