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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard rumors that LTE is the next best thing, and that current CDMA carriers like Bell, Telus, SaskTel will be transitioning to LTE in "the future". Anyone know what sort of timeframe "the future" is? Can we place much stock in these rumors? Is WiMAX pretty much a no-go here in Canada?

I guess the underlying reason for my question (other than curiosity) is that my wife and I are looking for some new phones. The selection of CDMA phones offered by SaskTel (our current carrier) absolutely sucks, and we're thinking of jumping to Rogers. From the little I know of LTE, it seems everyone is talking about GSM carriers "upgrading", as if it were an easier task for them than CDMA carriers. I'm wondering if a move to Rogers now mean less hassle later.
 

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LTE uses a wideband CDMA air interface, so no CDMA is not dead. 2nd Generation GSM uses a TDMA system, but 3rd and later generations (HSPA, LTE, etc) use W-CDMA.

The timeframe is actually pretty short (Telus and Bell should launch an HSPA network as early as the summer, with LTE coming in within two years). Regardless of whether you choose to change carriers or stick with SaskTel don't sign a contract so that you will have all options available to you when the new networks launch.
 

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I dont think you need to worry as to what kind of phone you use.. by the time that the CDMA network is shut down for the HSPA i'm sure contracts will be over and everybody will have a HSPA phone..

it was only last year that analog was turned off.. and that was because they say there was a lack of parts for repairing and very little people used analog phones anymore..

I believe telus gave everybody who was still using a analog phone a digital..

I'd suggest living for today, buying the phone you want and getting the plan you want, and letting tomorrow take care of itself.. whatever provider you accept, I'm sure they will take care of you in time of a switchover..
 

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"buy an iphone. i'm against contracts, especially anything over a year."

That kind of contradicts itself does it not? With rogers you stuck on a 3 year contract for an iphone
 

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Yes, you don't need to worry a bit about the viability of the technology behind the phone you choose. Providers will take care of you when they switch.
The only thing you should always keep in mind when choosing between GSM and other (I say "Other" and not CDMA because soon another player using phones incompatible with anything we know so far will be coming to Canada) technologies - with GSM you can change your phone at any time at your will and are able to choose from hundreds of available models worldwide, regradless of whether you have a contract with your provider or not. With CDMA you are stuck to whatever you have purchased from your provider for the duration of the contract, and entirely depend on your provider (can't purchase it from anywhere else) if you want a handset upgrade.
 

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That's not entirely true

...With CDMA you are stuck to whatever you have purchased from your provider for the duration of the contract, and entirely depend on your provider (can't purchase it from anywhere else) if you want a handset upgrade.
With CDMA there is no SIM card yes so it is more difficult to to change phones but still possible, behind your battery there will be a serial number you just need to call up your CDMA carrier and tell them you would like to switch from phone x to phone y. Me I have done this a few times, because I break phones or want to prove that my friends are not all knowing.
 

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we dont need smart alec remarks like cdma is not dead, the op is referring to is-96 aka Code Division Multiple Access, or better known as Carriers that Depend Mostlly on Analogue.

W-CDMA although uses a CDMA based transport method, the backend is still based on GSM architecture.

CDMA is about to have esn exhaustion, and is at the end of its life in terms of data expandibility, and the most important, it cant multitask data and a voice session at the same time, a big blow to Bellus.

sorry.
 

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LTE uses a wideband CDMA air interface, so no CDMA is not dead. 2nd Generation GSM uses a TDMA system, but 3rd and later generations (HSPA, LTE, etc) use W-CDMA.

The timeframe is actually pretty short (Telus and Bell should launch an HSPA network as early as the summer, with LTE coming in within two years). Regardless of whether you choose to change carriers or stick with SaskTel don't sign a contract so that you will have all options available to you when the new networks launch.
I think Deckster may be a trifle optimistic it he means anything more than some testing and experimentation. On another site, I read the Ericsson, in Sweden, just achieved the first successful hand-off from HSPA to an experimental LTE device. While the engineers have done their job and it all in theory, now it has to be proven in the real world. Bell and Telus may be big enough to get in on some of the trials, but I really don't see a widespread switch within 2 years. Moreover, as I understand it, LTE can be rolled out gradually (one of the advantages) in contrast to the Bell/Telus switch to HSPA/UTMS which had to be an all-or-nothing thing (and, of course they chose "nothing" for most of Manitoba and Saskatchewan). Meaning, it may be a while before SaskTel makes the switch OR SaskTel may decide to skip HSPA and wait for LTE.

Select new phones based on network coverage and price plans in the area the phones will be used (why inexpensive WIND service is not even worth considering most Canadians) and don't worry about obsolescence. The CDMA network will be around longer than any 3-year contact and meet the needs of all but the most demanding data users. It doesn't matter what device you choose; there will always be something "newer and better" coming in a few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
With Bell and Telus rolling out HSPA across Canada (except here in Saskatchewan!!!) and SaskTel saying they'll have their HSPA network up by next summer, I think time has answered my question. CDMA is dead. At least in the way I was thinking.

It looks like all the cool phones -- iPhone, Android based phones, etc -- will be available from from all the carriers, and they'll only work on this shiny new HSPA network. That's kinda what I was getting at in my original post (so long ago)
 

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The future of CDMA (as in 1x and EVDO) is exclusively in the hands of Qualcomm - if they are willing to be aggressive on licensing terms and loosen up control on the chipset side CDMA could be with us for another decade or more.

As it does voice just fine and remains quite efficent from a spectrum perspective - if Qualcomm pushes for status quo CDMA could disappear in only a couple of years.
 

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CDMA is not going to disappear within a couple years regardless of what Qualcomm does. Bell will run their network for many years to come if only to fulfill contractual obligations to GM for OnStar service.
 

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Well if you want to talk embedded and industrial analog and TDMA are alive and well in certain areas for specific reasons.

If Qualcomm will make it cost-effective to integrate CDMA compatibility into third-party LTE basebands CDMA could remain in mainstream use for years to come - Verizon has tens of billions invested in their CDMA network alone.

If Qualcomm will not loosen control over CDMA - which has always been its millstone it will drop out of mainstream use rapidly.
 

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TDMA does NOT exist in Canada anymore. There was way to little revenue generated from its usage compared to the cost to keep it live, thus there were way too little subscribers on it so it was more cost effective to shut it down and offer them all 2G GSM handsets even at no cost to the CX, the network still SAVED sufficient costs by doing this, and they removed all the diplexers and are now broadcasting more capacity on the networks now.
 

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You can't give a natural gas pipeline flow meter a free V3 Razr and call it a day.
 

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TDMA does NOT exist in Canada anymore.
GSM is TDMA. It's just a different version of TDMA compared to the IS-136 that Rogers used to use.
 

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the only similarities between gsm and tdma is the AIR INTERFACE, but other than that, everything else is different, its a completely different network from the ground up. Got it?
 
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