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Apple in the United States begain accepting pre-orders for its new touch-screen iPad device today. The device will be released on April 3rd in that country.

U.S. customers who pre-order the device can choose to have it delivered on April 3rd or have one reserved for pick-up at their nearest Apple retail store.

Apple has yet to announce when pre-orders for the iPad will be taken in Canada and has only said that the device would be available in this country in "late April".

In the United States, the Wi-Fi version of the iPad can be pre-ordered in 16GB, 32GB and 64GB models for $499, $599, $699 US. 3G versions are selling for a $130 premium over the Wi-Fi version.
 

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No big surprise here. That's been pretty much the case for most consumer electronics products from most manufacturers: release first in the States, then to the rest of the world later. The only way a Canadian could get one at the US launch date is if they have a contact in the USA purchase one for them.

The one month wait however might not be a bad thing. What if the iPad has a fatal flaw in it that hasn't been discovered yet?
 

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Never understood why they like to release in the US first. The US is one of the slowest adopters of new technology in the western world, surprisingly.

Anyway I have no interest in the iPad. Now the Adam, is a different story.
 

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Yes, it's the reason that North American cell phones are so far behind the rest of the world, the reason you could still buy 4:3 TVs until very recently (in fact may still be able to), and the reason when DVD was launched in NA you often got two versions of movies (Widescreen and 4:3) whereas in Europe and the rest of the world we converted immediately to widescreen and 4:3 TVs disappeared almost overnight.

The USA has it's share of new technology fanbois, but the general populace rarely takes up new technology, at least not in a rapid timeframe.
 

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Yes, it's the reason that North American cell phones are so far behind the rest of the world, the reason you could still buy 4:3 TVs until very recently (in fact may still be able to), and the reason when DVD was launched in NA you often got two versions of movies (Widescreen and 4:3)
This could not be further from the truth. 4:3 aspect ratio is still alive and well in Europe, and especially in the rest of the world, and 4:3 sets are still being sold. Europe is not just UK.

...whereas in Europe and the rest of the world we converted immediately to widescreen and 4:3 TVs disappeared almost overnight.
You forgot to say that this is a joke, right?
 

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Never understood why they like to release in the US first. The US is one of the slowest adopters of new technology in the western world, surprisingly.
I can tell you why. You seem to call the technology (especially trends in cell phones and TV) to which were accustomed to in the UK "advanced", while the correct word is "different" - because of the different market. Apple's product are by far most popular in North America, US is the biggest single country there, hence the initial release is in the US. The initial release of a new Nokia cell phone with an advanced and revolutionary new colour will, of course, be in Europe. ;)
 

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Actually, Canterbury, I think the main reason why US/Canada are so behind in terms of mobile phones, service, and plans is that our countries are absolutely massive.

Therefore, the infrastructure cost is huge, and the margins were initially quite slim. Rolling out new technology takes a lot of time and money. Europe is smaller in comparison, and contains twice the amount of people.


Apple releasing the iPad in their home country first, just like they have with every other product, shouldn't be a head-scratcher. They know this market the best.

I'm still debating on buying one. I will probably wait until the second generation, because I only recently got a laptop and can't justify another $500+ any time soon.
 

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Technology of and in phones themselves has nothing to do with network and coverage. 3G/4G gear yes, but not everything else like processing power, power consumption, screen resolution, camera, functionality etc.
 

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Actually, Canterbury, I think the main reason why US/Canada are so behind in terms of mobile phones, service, and plans is that our countries are absolutely massive.
Partly but the real reason if you talk to telco experts is the cost of landline service is so much higher in the rest of the world than in North America.

The result is that many North Americans waited longer to adopt wireless in a big way. In Europe and developing world, Mobile is priced close to landline or is actually cheaper. Different economics means different adoption patterns.

Interestingly, smartphone adoption in North America is very high so I'm not sure we are behind, just on a different adoption curve.
 

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The reasons I've read about mobile phone technology differences between NA and rest of the world is that in NA people tend to commute in their own vehicles, Europeans and east Asia tend to take public transit a lot more. As a result those markets have more time to play with their phones etc resulting in a higher demand for the different features compared to the NA market.

Also, I'm not sure about the rest of Europe, but I find the landline prices in Canada to be higher or comparable to those in the UK. I can't believe what Rogers etc charge for a landline here. However in the UK mobile phone costs and call costs are a fraction of cell costs here (the network costs due to monopolies in Canada and the excessive cost of coverage to population that just can't get gotten away from.)
 

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Yes, prices of mobile services in North America are higher than in the rest of the world, and I agree that the main reason is less competition. But the 2 main factors that led to the lack of real competition have not been mentioned yet. First, it was the unfortunate fact, that because of US military usage, the first allocated cellular bands in North America have been chosen different from the rest of the world - 850 an 1900 Mhz, while the rest of the world went with 900 and 1800. This made all the phones designed to work here incompatible with the rest of the world, which led to less models for North America and less ability for the NA carriers to diversify the portfolio and lower the prices of the handsets offered.
The other, even bigger factor, was the unfortunate adoption of the CDMA, instead of GSM digital standard, by major carriers in North America, when they had to choose what to replace their old analog networks with. This enslaved the subscribers of Bell and Telus to their carriers - their phones cannot work on any other carrier in the world, and in order for the carriers to subsidize the handsets (CDMAs are more expensive than the GSM versions), they embraced the practice of forcing customers into monstrous 3-year contracts. Thus subscribers were stuck for a very long period with outdated and less capable phones. This crippled competition and led us to the high prices we still have now. Few people realize how retarded the whole CDMA thing really was (and still is) - until like 2005 Telus and Bell's subscribers could not even send text messages, while Fido had national and international texting since 1997.
Things are starting to get back to normal, with the CDMA carriers abandanoning CDMA and adopting more universal next generation standards. Smart phones are well and widely accepted here too, so it's only the higher prices, that stil plague most of North America's cell landscape, that remain to be addressed.
 
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