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Discussion Starter #1
I moved into a new house about 3 years ago. Initially had Rogers but dumped them and switched to Bell. Now my 2 years are up and I'm ready to go to internet only plus streaming services. All of the resellers who use Bell lines do not pass the availability check for my address, but the Rogers ones do (specific example was CarryTel). But both Rogers and Bell are using FTTH (I don't have coax coming into the house) and the fibre that was connected to the Rogers modem had broken off during some renos. That means I could not do a self-install. So I called CarryTel to speak to a human and wondering if they offered an in-person hook up where the tech could re-connect the fibre (there's plenty of slack). After I described my situation the lady put me on hold to talk to someone more technical and when she came back she apologized and said that they actually cannot offer me service, despite the availability checker saying they could.

So it looks like I can only deal with Bell or Rogers, directly. Is this "legal"? Isn't there some CRTC regulation against this? I really did not want to pay Rogers $88/month for service that CarryTel offers for $50.
 

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The other option is to sign up with Bell or Rogers using a new customer promo. Make sure that the promo lasts the length of the contract (contract does not expire before the contract is up) and switch to a cheaper provider at the end of the contract. Bell is notorious for having promos that expire long before the contract but Rogers often has promos and contracts that are the same length. Another thing with Rogers is that they will sometimes match the competition for new customers or when a promo expires so it's worth calling them to see what they can offer.
 

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May be perfectly legal. The resellers just may not be equipped or want to resell in your area.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I would be a returning customer for Rogers and a current one for Bell. I guess I just play one against the other for who will give me the better rate. I just don't understand how Rogers can charge nearly $90 for the Dave service that CaryTel offers for $50. And they offer unlimited Canada/US home phone for $10 where I'm paying over $30 to Bell. It just doesn't make sense that re-seller can offer a better deal.
 

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It may be that Rogers won't send a tech to do the repair and install due to CV19. There were some issues over reselling FTTH as well. It was not required at one time and still may not be in some areas. Never mind that resellers may not have access to the equipment required for FTTH services.

It just doesn't make sense that re-seller can offer a better deal.
It makes sense in the context of retail markup. Why do some companies charge more than others? It's because some have higher cost structures or require higher profits in order to appease investors and attract high paid employees. Some just charge more because they can due to having a monopoly or a better product. Bell and Rogers suffer from all of these, or should I say customers suffer because of them. Resellers can sell for less because the CRTC sets wholesale rates and they can operate with lower markups.
 

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It just doesn't make sense that re-seller can offer a better deal.
Actually, if you understand how things are done, you get some clues. I was working in planning at Unitel, when long distance competition was rolled out. Back in those days, the entire network was built on something called Time Division Multiplexing (TDM), where everything was done in time slots. Back then, a standard voice channel, as offered by Unitel or Bell, was 64 Kb/s. A reseller would buy bandwidth in bulk from those companies and instead of offering the same 64 Kb channels, they'd use compression to provide 2 or more channels in the bandwidth normally used for 1. So, they provided a lower cost, by providing a somewhat inferior product. These days, with VoIP, Rogers has a separate network for VoIP, at least to the customer, and can then provide priority to that service over their network. A reseller might be using the public Internet connection, which means the priority mechanism might not be used, so you're again getting a slightly poorer service for less money. In addition, the resellers might be overselling capacity to a greater extent than the main carriers do. This was a significant problem back in the TDM days, with some resellers providing really awful service, but at a low price.
 

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This thread is about internet but, yes, similar things can happen with TPIAs. There have been cases where they did not have enough bandwidth to handle peak loads. TPIA customers can experience issues due to TPIAs being reliant on the infrastructure owner for upgrades and maintenance. I've seen cases where miscommunication and poor communication between the TPIA and the incumbent resulted in lost service, botched upgrades and slow repairs. TPIAs often cannot resell the highest speed plans and latest technologies available from incumbent internet providers.
 

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Wprager: May not be possible by you but for $23 a month? you can get cell phone unlimited international text and calls to Canada with a cheap cell phone and Public Mobile(not sure if this can be stated) or possibly another service.
my attempt to quote did not go well! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
But this isn't TDM so 75Mbps unlimited b/w is the same whether it's offered by Rogers or CarryTel. The difference is the customer support. CarryTel requires you to buy your own modem and do your own install. You save money but you have to do more and are not covered if something goes wrong (e.g. your modem breaks, but a new one). The past about using a separate network for phone service doesn't really bother me that much as I will likely just drop my "land" line soon, since everyone in the house has a mobile. Also I'm pretty sure in the last 10-15 years they've worked on traffic management/traffic engineering for VoIP so phone calls will have priority.

My point, really, was that a re-seller takes his cut, Rogers gets theirs, and the customer still pays less. So you introduce an extra middleman but the price drops. That's counter intuitive. Of course the reason is that Rogers wants to make as much as they can so they overcharge for their service under the guise of better quality of service.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wprager: May not be possible by you but for $23 a month? you can get cell phone unlimited international text and calls to Canada with a cheap cell phone and Public Mobile(not sure if this can be stated) or possibly another service.
my attempt to quote did not go well! :)
Yeah, right now we are rarely using the "landline" as everyone has their cellphone. I got the home phone to get the unlimited internet in a bundle. Plan is to either get rid of it entirely (and get a cordless phone set with bluetooth link to cellphones -- so that the "home" phone rings when your mobile number is called) or port the current home number to my mobile plan, if that's possible (I've got one of the original 599 Kanata prefixes and I'm rather fond of it).
 

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Yeah, right now we are rarely using the "landline" as everyone has their cellphone. I got the home phone to get the unlimited internet in a bundle. Plan is to either get rid of it entirely (and get a cordless phone set with bluetooth link to cellphones -- so that the "home" phone rings when your mobile number is called) or port the current home number to my mobile plan, if that's possible (I've got one of the original 599 Kanata prefixes and I'm rather fond of it).

Rogers and Bell both make obscene profits and I will not support that. I've shopped around, done the math and found that a good TPIA is now equivalent to the big dogs both in quality and service, at least in our community.

Yes you own your equipment (modem, router, etc.) but the monthly savings from being with a TPIA allow one to upgrade their equipment annually if you are so inclined.
I'll admit, we've had some service issues, but these were what ExDilbert mentioned when maintenance communication was poor between Rogers and Teksavvy. I get that.

But now, if I could only get Rogers to replace the batteries in their UPS's powering the infrastructure in our neighborhood, we'd be good. FYI - there is no fibre optic cable in our village, only copper infrastructure at this time.

Have you considered voip.ms for home phone service? We have it and it is OTT. 2 phone numbers and cost is never more than $7/month including long distance.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Rogers and Bell both make obscene profits and I will not support that. I've shopped around, done the math and found that a good TPIA is now equivalent to the big dogs both in quality and service, at least in our community.

Yes you own your equipment (modem, router, etc.) but the monthly savings from being with a TPIA allow one to upgrade their equipment annually if you are so inclined.
I'll admit, we've had some service issues, but these were what ExDilbert mentioned when maintenance communication was poor between Rogers and Teksavvy. I get that.

But now, if I could only get Rogers to replace the batteries in their UPS's powering the infrastructure in our neighborhood, we'd be good. FYI - there is no fibre optic cable in our village, only copper infrastructure at this time.

Have you considered voip.ms for home phone service? We have it and it is OTT. 2 phone numbers and cost is never more than $7/month including long distance.
Cell reception in the basement is pretty poor. The phone rings but then I have to go upstairs to actually be able to talk. Given that we'll probably be working from home for the foreseeable future I might have to re-think the idea of dropping the home phone. Another possibility is to leave the phone upstairs and use the previously mentioned Bluetooth cordless set.
 

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Another possibility is to leave the phone upstairs and use the previously mentioned Bluetooth cordless set.
If your phone supports WiFi calling, that may do the trick for you. I have long had poor cell in my condo, but with WiFi calling that's no longer an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If your phone supports WiFi calling, that may do the trick for you. I have long had poor cell in my condo, but with WiFi calling that's no longer an issue.
Excellent suggestion. Unfortunately I'm with Public Mobile and they don't support wifi calling.
 

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There are a number of free wifi calling apps. The only catch is that, unlike cellular carrier wifi calling, they use a different phone number. The upside is that they are truly free to use, not billed against air time as with many carriers.

There are a couple of Canadian companies, Fongo and TextNow, that I have used. TextNow was good but the ads have become very invasive. Fongo has the option to remove ads for a small, one time purchase.
 
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