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I've lost track of how many times a thread on this situation has been started. 46FD04 has the correct solution for 90% of the times this happens. My money is on incorrect dish alignment. It can also be due to equipment failure or bad wiring so don't rule them out completely. Check for dish alignment and obstructions first.

Jesseroberge, please read the installation and dish alignment threads for Bell TV.
 

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It's difficult to say what is wrong with the info given. By the sound of it, snow on the dish is the problem. Assuming the LNB and receiver are OK, it could be snow, some other blockage (like a tree), a needed check switch, bad dish aiming or bad cabling. If the receiver has not been plugged in and connected to a good signal for some time (a week or more,) it could have lost its activation.

Was the "xxxx" on the check switch screen or somewhere else?
 

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Extra Bell TV outlets can be provided by using the other 2 outputs on the 4x4 switch. A lot depends on the switching method. Bell uses voltage levels. If the FTA receiver uses something else then it won't work with a Bell 4x4 switch. There may be ways to rig something up by using a second 4x4 switch and some extra FTA gear but read on.

how can I wire this up so I can get both 82,91 and 110,119,129 on my sv8000 FTA ird without affecting switching on my bell sub system
You can't, at least not legally. Bell uses proprietary encryption that cannot be legally decrypted with non-Bell receivers. If you are looking for some sort of illegal workaround, this is the wrong site. That's against forum rules.
 

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but you would need a source of Hydro, so that's why the Garage is recommended.
But I don't have a garage. :eek: That statement is incorrect anyway. The switch is fed by receiver output line one using coax and a power inserter. The power inserter can be any where within a reasonable distance. Near the receiver will work. The connection is switch output line 1 > power inserter > receiver. Depending on the layout of the installation, a DPP QUAD might be the better or cheaper option.
 

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Using the 6400, do a check switch with the dish disconnected, connect the dish in the garage, then do another check switch. That may need to be repeated when moving it back. Personally, I would just leave the 6131 in the garage and not bother moving anything. Moving receivers probably puts more wear an tear on them than anything else, especially a PVR. Putting a DPP LNB on the garage dish might be another solution.
 

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Another issue could be lack of DC conductivity which could show up as a check switch failure. The receiver sends DC power to operate the switch and the LNB. If there is too much voltage drop, one or both may fail to operate. In this case, it sounds like the switch is not getting enough voltage.
 

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My info is a little dated but probably good enough. A single LNBs on the 18" dish will get 91 and just the SD channels. A 20" dish with a double LNB or two legacy singles with a switch will get 91 and 82 with all the available channels, both SD and HD. Don't know what you mean by digital LNBF but if it's a DishPro LNB with built in switch then that would be the one to use provided there is a 20" dish.
 

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What you have is probably a legacy twin LNB with two LNBs in one housing, two outputs and an internal switch. It looks similar to the Quad LNB at the house but has only two outputs. A dual LNB is a completely different animal. Two dual LNBs plus a switch are require to get HD.

will the dual LNB give me two SD signals?
Yes. The SD receiver will see the all the transponders and the SD channels but will ignore the HD channels.
 

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@ktmdiesel Run the cable directly from the LNB to the receiver with no splitters or other devices. The dish might be pointed at the wrong satellites. Make sure the pole is vertical by using a level. Then set elevation and skew. Make sure you are using magnetic coordinates and a compass. Just 9 degrees off will result in picking up the wrong satellite.
 

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There is no way to tell without doing an accurate onsite site survey. Moving the dish in any direction may help. As already stated, moving the dish away from the obstruction and/or higher will help clear the top of the trees. Moving the dish to the side may help avoid obstructions that cannot be cleared over the top.

It sounds like moving the dish sideways may hep in this case. If the open view is not wide enough, it may be necessary to use two dishes, one for 91 and another for 82. In extreme cases, switching to a provider with satellites that have a higher elevation may be the only option (like Shaw Direct.)
 

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Seeing only one satellite can be indicative of several things. They include incorrect installation, a misaligned dish, a bad RG6 cable connection, a defective LNB, a defective switch, a defective receiver or another defective component. It usually takes some troubleshooting to isolate the issue.

This might help: The "Hopper" is the Bell 9500 and the "Joey" is a Bell 7500.

If there is any other existing equipment, such as switches, bypass them for now. They may be incompatible.
 

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I agree, the 9241 requires a different dish and LNB, and possibly new wiring than the 5100 to work correctly. To use an existing single coax with a 9241, the minimum would be an oval dish with a DPP LNB and a DPP separator at the receiver. To use an existing oval dish with two legacy LNBs, a 4x4 switch and two coaxes would be required.
 

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If the legacy LNBs are replaced with a DPP LNB then the SW44 should be eliminated. If the existing wiring to the SW44 is not long enough to reach the new DPP LNB then use barrel connectors to join the existing wiring so the receivers are connected directly to the DPP LNB. Use a single coax and a DPP separator at any dual tuner receivers.
 

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I agree that reducing coax connections to as few as possible is the best option. Barrel connectors need to be rated at 2GHz or higher. Excessively corroded connectors should be replaced with high quality compression connectors. Cables with signs of water ingress, such as corroded inner conductors, need to be replaced.
 

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The SW44 won't work with a 9500. DPP equipment is required. A DPP quad LNB is the first step. If a switch is still required (but likely won't be) then a DPP switch is required. The new connections will be one RG6 direct from the DPP quad LNB to the receivers for up to 4 receivers. Receivers with two coax inputs will require a DPP separator. There should be pinned threads with diagrams in the Bell Satellite installation forum but they may be more complicated than necessary.
 
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