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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,

I'm about to start basement renos. Clean slate, totally unfinished at the moment. The intent is to have a dedicated home theatre room, however there are other rooms being constructed as well. I have a bit of a balancing act, weighing ideal size and dimensions for the HT, vs. usable leftover space for other adjacent rooms.

In the web searching I've done I've stumbled across the C, 1.6C, 2.33C ratio. Meaning C = height, 1.6xC = width, 2.33xC = length. (I'm not sure if this is something the HT enthusiasts in this forum community embrace, or not).

As luck would have it those ratios work fairly well with what I had in mind anyway and what fits in my basement. I have a corner of the house where there are no windows. The vertical measurement from concrete floor to bottom of the ceiling joists is 93" (7.75 ft). I figure accounting for subfloor/flooring and ceiling material, the working height in the room is ~ 7.5 ft, maybe a tad less. Using the ratios above, that equates to a width of ~12 ft, and a length of ~17.5 ft.

That is definitely doable in my basement, and I can work with that in terms of developing the other adjacent rooms into usable spaces as well.

Regarding what contents the HT room would eventually contain:
- I'll definitely want pre-wiring for 7.1/7.2 surround. (not sure if I'd bother with 9.1/9.2)
- two rows of seating, w/ 2nd row elevated on a 10-12" riser.
- projector, and 100-110" wall-mounted screen (16x9, likely not 2.35 anamorphic).

So my questions are: Am I on the right track? Do those dimensions sound reasonable? Are the measurements typically inside surface to inside surface, or center-to-center? How big a deal is it if you deviate a bit from those ratios, plus or minus half a foot either way? I'm realizing if I go with a double-wall configuration for soundproofiing that extra wall width will eat into floorspace a bit.

Thanks.
 

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Just my opinion but to go to the amount of trouble to double wall everything ,you better go all out with duct work and electrical outlets,etc...
Not worth the trouble if you ask me and like you said ,it eats into the dimensions and budget.
Also keep in mind that a projector mounted on the ceiling with a screen that size will probably put viewers heads right at projector height as they walk by.
 

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as I mentioned with regards the position of the projector, try to position it directly above the 1st row of viewers and keep the cables as high as possible. Those on the riser will be banging their heads all night if you don't.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good suggestion.

A couple of the projectors I'm considering are the Epson 8350 and the Panasonic AE4000.

To be above the heads of the first row of seating I think that would put the projector roughly ~11-12 ft back from the screen. Does that sound like a doable range, with respect to throw distance and screen size?
 

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Does that sound like a doable range, with respect to throw distance and screen size?
Check the calculator on Projector central for calculating optimal distances.

edit: checked at 12 feet with 100" screen you get an image brightness of 16fl so not bad.

The only thing I would say is do the best to raise the ceiling.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The only thing I would say is do the best to raise the ceiling.
I'm not sure how that could be done. The area of basement the HT room will be is directly under the living room. To get more access would mean what... modifying the floor joists somehow?

(Unfortunately I can't change the fact that my wife and I didn't have the foresight to request 9 ft ceilings when our house was under construction 4 years ago).
 

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Inzane, sometimes people put drop ceilings. I guess I meant to say was do everything possible to maximize the height of the ceiling.
 

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Room ratios sound good. Deviations are okay but you'd like to pay attention later to room treatments and calibration.

No such thing as sound proofing unless your budget is limitless. Prioritize your design objectives, build accordingly, and enjoy.
 

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inzane,

I did a bunch of soundproofing in my basement room. I did not do a whole lot in terms of 'acoustically perfect' dimensions as my room is about 75% HT, and 25% with kids running around too.

I may add more wall treatments to fix some things in the room, but overall, I am happy with it.

I used Isomax Clips for my ceiling with hatchannelling, green glue and 2 x 5/8" drywall.

P
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I guess I am thinking a "dropped" ceiling. I've always known it as a suspended ceiling. (removable tiles for access).

Obviously I will put insulation in the ceiling between the joists.

Are those isolation clips only for a drywalled ceiling or are they applicable to a drop ceiling as well?
 

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The clips are for drywall. You want / need the mass. If going with a suspended drop ceiling, that's fine. Don't spend money on soundproofing in that case. The drop ceiling will not isolate very much at all.
 

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Not necessarily. Generally the walls and floors are much more absorptive, while the ceiling is more reflective. I'm not an in-room acoustics guy, however that's the general design trend
 

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I'm surprised allot of you folks don't believe in good Ole' fashioned wood or cedar for acoustics. Not too long ago I lived in a log home with cedar vaulted ceilings and the acoustics were absolutely amazing. Prior to that, I was in a dry walled home with the same sound system that I still have. I have since moved and am now living with dry wall acoustics again. Still the same system and it still sounds great, but still not as good as that good Ole' fashioned log/cedar home. I can't wait to buy a new home again (which will happen very soon) and build a good Ole' fashioned cedar or log home theater room.
 

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rows of seating

How many seats in each row?

at 12' wide, it might be a bit tight to have the seats centered and aisles on each side.

P
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How many seats in each row?

at 12' wide, it might be a bit tight to have the seats centered and aisles on each side.

P
I haven't totally figured that out yet.

I'd be ok with an aisle on only one side, if that can be done and not look bad.

I was thinking 2 rows of 3. However, if its possible to get 4 across in the backrow, I'd consider that too.

If I had to I could go a row of 3 and a row of 2, but I think I'd like to be able to seat at least 6.
 

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an aisle on one side would work.... but no one is centered in the middle of the screen. Same situation with me. I have a row of 4 seats, but I am always in the Left-middle seat.

I think, my room is about 18'ish wide. I have a narrow aisle on one side(24-30") and a slightly wider aisle on the other... 30-34" likely....

Not the best pic. but


it's been 2 years since that pic was posted, and I still haven't covered up that lally column.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Since I started this thread, I've been convinced to go drywall for the ceiling vs. a dropped ceiling. :D
 
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