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Has anyone figured out how to use Kindle to read library ebooks borrowed using the Overdrive system common to Canadian public libraries? If there is a way to sideload these successfully using Calibre or something then I am thinking of opting for a Kindle rather than a Kobo.... I did search the subforum here but related threads are all very old, and nobody at that point seemed to be successful. (please feel free to PM me if you do not wish to comment publicly.)

TIA.
 

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It is still not possible with an e-ink Kindle. I've spoken with Overdrive reps here in Canada who have told me that it's been ready to go since it went live in the US, but Amazon refuses to turn it on. That said, they may be just passing the buck.

With a Kindle Fire (the colour, tablet-style Kindles) Overdrive can be loaded from the Amazon app store. If you want to use an e-ink device (and I do recommend it, as they're much easier on your eyes), then get a Kobo.
 

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From the Overdrive Website (older (2013) link, but still applies):

Library eBooks - not on Kindle in Canada yet - Updated Dec. 19, 2013 (Web Team Blog)

There are comments which still show no updates (2014).


Here's the link to device compatibility:

Getting Started with Library eBooks : Books, Video, Research & More : Toronto Public Library


My wife still uses her 6-year old Sony eReader, downloading to computer first, then synch with the Sony.

If you can transfer files to the Kindle, then something like Calibre may work. Download to a computer using Digital Editions, use Calibre, move to Kindle?
 

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^^^^
When I was using an e-ink Kobo ( I prefer reading books on an Android tablet ), I used the Overdrive app on my computer to download the book and then transfer it to the Kobo. Perhaps the same could be done with the Kindle.
 

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@JamesK, although it might be possible (perhaps using Calbre as I mentioned to convert the file to something usable by the Kindle), the first link in my previous post states:

Kindle eReaders require eBooks to be in a proprietary format unique to Amazon. Amazon has not made this format available through OverDrive (the library's eBook provider) in Canada, so Canadian libraries do not have the option of lending eBooks that work with Kindle readers.
So, a direct transfer is unlikely to work, but after "conversion" by Calibre it may be possible - if it's possible to move that file to the Kindle.
 

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The only way is to strip the DRM and convert using Calibre. But that is not legit.
Maybe not.... I BUY Kindle format ebooks from Amazon and strip the DRM before converting them to EPub using Calibre for my Kobo. Have no intention of selling the books so I have no cares about the technical legitimacy of the process.


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Purchasing a book and then "converting" it so that you can use it (personally) on your device(s) certainly seems OK to me.

The issue with library books is that the library purchases "rights" from the publisher with an agreement that they can "loan" out a certain number of books based on their "purchases" and for a period of no more than 3 weeks at a time (so that others can access without too much delay). Calibre would undo those restrictions, but I agree that unless you're making a profit from the "conversion", there is no major legal issue.
 

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I (and wife) used to buy books and strip drm (in the days when only one can read from one device). But in the past 3 years, we stopped buying ebooks. We discovered that borrowing from Toronto Library (using Overdrive) is economical and no hassles. We reserve the new good titles and wait patiently in line. But, there are so many books to read that it does not matter if they are the latest and best, since eventually they will come.
 

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Even if you can figure out how to strip the DRM and convert it to a compatible format using Calibre, it's a major hassle. The Kobo Aura is $129 and regularly (including right now) goes on sale for $99. If you want to borrow library books on a regular basis, it seems like an awful lot of ongoing hassle to save $100.

And of course there's also the ethical issue. Not only is it violating the conditions of use of the book, but the more people who do this, the more publishers work to tighten the DRM on their ebooks, or raise prices to compensate for lost sales. The inevitable costs of that are passed on to libraries, which subsequently leads to worse service for their customers.
 

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I prefer books printed on real paper and I buy several per year as well as visiting my local library every week. I don't borrow ebooks from the library but as I noted above I do buy lots of them when Amazon has a sale of Kindle books. I have noticed recently on Amazon that some ebooks have a note saying that the publisher has requested that the book be sold without DRM. Saves me having to strip it as I move the book to Calibre.
It is unclear why books should have DRM. I can understand it for films and to a certain extent for music but the whole idea of a book for centuries is that you can read it and pass it on by sale or gift.


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Why is it okay for movies and music but not books? Authors, editors, and publishers all deserve to be paid for their work, no?

Books for centuries could not be replicated infinitely with no cost and at the touch of a button. In 1850, you could buy a copy of David Copperfield and then pass it on to a friend or loved one. You couldn't instantly send it to every one of them simultaneously. I don't agree with much of the way the industry has implemented their DRM and pricing models, but I absolutely support the idea that they need to protect their business.
 

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A lot of libraries do have sales of books / CD's etc. once or more often a year to raise money. Often at ridiculously low prices too.

Cameron
 

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It is very frustrating to me that Amazon and overdrive Canada are not solving this problem. As a result I did the one time setup described How to Remove DRM on Kindle eBooks Using Calibre and then I borrow from my library, load the book in Calibre which strips the DRM and convert to mobi format and then upload using Amazon's sendtokindle app and it delivers wirelessly to my Kindle paper white. Once I've read it I delete it. It is a pain to setup initially but after you have it setup it takes three clicks to get any library book on my kindle (Open book in Calibre, right click and convert to mobi, select mobi file in windows explorer, righ click and select uploadtokindle) so it is very fast process.
 

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Re the How to Remove DRM... That plugin works well most of the time but there is a new DRM scheme on some Kindle books that it does not handle. The KFX encryption. I have not attempted to follow this up.


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Subway is enquiring about epub library downloads. Suggest he reads TorontoColin's response on Page 1. I'm not sure it can be done, except perhaps via a PC.
 
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