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What kind of company has a network topology that takes out the whole network for internet, voice and television. And yes I realize it is all digital now so it is just data on their stream. But Rogers has just demonstrated that their infrastructure is neither robust, redundant and a probable single point of failure tripped their whole network. Thank goodness they haven't closed the Shaw merger yet and this demonstrates why it shouldn't be allowed. They do not have the competence to control this much of internet in Canada. I'm not even a Rogers subscriber but as a TPIA subscriber they took me out too. Who designs a network that falls like dominos, an issue in one centre should not take out everything from Vancouver to the maritimes.
 

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I can whole heartedly agree with you. While I am not anti-Rogers, I think they are a great company, but back in the day when the cellphone network went down, just the cellphones stopped working, home phone and broadband internet were unaffected. But fast forward to today, an outage and the entire network of Wireless, Broadband and landlines goes down, not just that but the debit payments and OLG Lottery terminals stopped working too, I guess they're so tightly integrated one issue wipes out many services now which is something I do not like, but I can also tell you the rest of the population does not like this idea either.
 

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Their news outlet seemed to make light of the situation. It wasn't just people not being able to watch their cat videos. Government departments were impacted. Small and large businesses were hit. This is a huge security issue and has to be addressed. Our economy is increasingly dependent on WIFI. We need some sort of emergency backup system in case the Russians or some other bad actor decides to shut the internet down.
 

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Yesterday's outage was (to me) a good example of why bundling all services with one provider isn't a good idea. My wife and I have Rogers for Internet and Ignite TV services, but Koodo for mobile/cell service (with a generous amount of data). As a result - and quite thankfully - we were essentially unaffected by the outage. (y)
 

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I wonder those who have Rogers services, will they get a credit for the inconvenience their subscribers had to go thru?
Yes, trust me, every Rogers customer will get one.

TELUS FOR THE WIN!!!! Rogers can keep on calling me to win me back but never gonna happen. And I agree with everything said above. This was a perfect example of why the Rogers Shaw merger should not happen. At my work, because we're on Shaw, our whole network would have been down and we would have lost millions.

Fun Fact: If Rogers owned Shaw now, THIS is how many more people would have been affected.

Overall, Shaw Communications has 2.1 million broadband internet subscribers, 1.9 million wireless subscribers, 1.4 million cable video subscribers, 1.0 million home phone customers, and 656k satellite video subscribers

Rogers - 10 million wireless subscribers and 2.25 million retail internet subscribers plus unknown land phones.

That would have been over 20 million Canadians been affected. How many tens of millions would have been lost due to this massive outage?
 

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I wonder those who have Rogers services, will they get a credit for the inconvenience their subscribers had to go thru?
They might get one or more days of service credit. What about the people who are out hundreds of dollars for lost wages or financial transactions? What about the small businesses who lost thousands of dollars due to lost transaction. What about the many millions of dollars lost by big businesses? Unfortunately, Canada's legal system is designed to protect big businesses like Rogers at the cost of people and businesses with fewer resources so little or no compensation for indirect damages will be available to Rogers customers and others that were affected.

This is yet another consequence of the CRTC allowing too much concentration of ownership and vertical integration in the communications and broadcasting industries. It's time to reverse direction and break up the Canadian oligarchs posing as high tech businesses and restore real competition in Canada.
 

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Before you criticize Rogers, you should learn what the cause of the problem is. In the case of the cell failure last year, it was a software update provided by Ericsson that caused the problem. With yesterday's failure, it appears to be an update to the routers. Those routers are made by Cisco, who likely supplied the update for them. I don't know what Rogers could have done differently, but in both failures, it appears to be an equipment supplier that caused them. Also, routers use routing protocols to distribute route information. Cisco uses one called EIGRP. They could also use the generic OSPF, which also works with other makes. Because the purpose of these protocols is to propgate network routes, a problem in one router can quickly spread to others and this can also make it difficult to determine where the source of the problem is.
 

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Everyone wants the cheapest service available. If you want 99.9 percent reliability and backup then that is available but at a price. Public sevices(police} demand 99.9 percent service. What are you prepared to pay for this kind service? Having a backup redundant sevice sitting waiting for just what happened is not cheap.
 

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You do not roll out software updates to routers or cell hardware without having a proper test environment. That is completely irresponsible. I do not care(harsher words insert please) if it was a supplier. In my career I dealt with suppliers and updates and did not trust a supplier without checking and double checking and testing. You are the one whose reputation is on the line, not the supplier, as far as the customer is concerned. Wake the ... up!

No backup waiting requiired. Just do the job including testing.
IBM would have screwed me up more than once if I had trusted their BS.
 

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We will get a couple of bucks credit for lack of service and agro. I notice our cutting-edge best ever igniteTV is acting up now. It was fine this morning then some tech at Rogers Central plugged in the coffee maker and Blooey! We're in Mississauga, so I don't know how wide spread THIS problem is.
 

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I wonder how many people and businesses are seriously looking into Bell or other alternative ISPs after the Black Friday Fiasco? Our Ignite TV is malfunctioning, though it seemed to be working this morning. I tried phoning in to the techs but the robo-customer rep was having a bad day and couldn't take my call, so she hung up. I imagine I'll get a call later asking me if I'd like to upgrade to their premium service ---- only one or two service failures per month.o_O:D
 

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@Rogers Customer 77

My last bill was $317, so that's just over $10/day.

Also, as mentioned above, redundancy costs money. It's not too bad if the redundant systems can carry traffic, but it still costs. Some companies will have more than one connection to the Internet, often through different providers. Back in the early 90s, I worked on redundant connections between the Royal Bank data centre on Front St. W. in Toronto and another one in Guelph. There were 4 DS3 connections (45 Mb each), 2 from my company and 2 from Bell and they weren't allowed to cross anywhere between sites. One from each company went west and the other 2 went east out of that building on Front. Years ago, when I was a computer technician maintaining the big systems, redundancy meant duplicate hardware, one online and one on standby.
 

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My local City tv relay transmitter get it's tv feed from satellite dish , Rogers kept City tv over the air feed running here no loss of City tv signal out here in western canada.
 

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@JamesK
When I was working through obtaining my CCNA designation, it was drilled into the class that you never test an update or patch on a production machine.
I worked for a time as a Domain Admin for a large company that created software for ATM's. We had a group policy in place that prevented Microsoft OS patches from updating user workstations until we had the opportunity to test those patches out on our on workstations. Often times those patches would break my workstation. Imagine the mayhem that would have caused if those patches were installed automatically.
Not to criticize Rogers but it seems they take their vendors at face value without doing due diligence with respect of testing updates before rolling them out on production machines.
 

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@Gentleman

I agree about not putting untested patches into service and I don't know what Rogers did. However, I do know that no matter how much testing you do, you can't catch everything and I used to do software testing at IBM in the late 90s. I also have decades of experience on hardware, telecom and networks that says the same thing. There are plenty of examples where someone didn't test for something, because that something never occurred to them. We'll just have to see what else they report.

BTW, I did my CCNA entirely on my own. I had classes for Netware CNA 3.x & CNE 4.x, and also did OS/2 Warp 4 on my own.
 

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@Rogers Customer 77

No company is immune to problems. Several years ago, AT&T phone network crashed because someone made a change that couldn't cause problems. Many years ago, when I was a tech with CN Telecommunications, I was often involved in reroutes with Bell. Sometimes they were doing emergency reroutes for us and sometimes we were for them. When I was in Northern Ontario, forest fires were a common cause and for CN, trains heading into the bush and taking out the pole line happened occasionally. I also recall one time when someone knocked down a Bell microwave tower near Brockville (IIRC) and we carred Bell between Toronto and Montreal. So, problems happen. The question is what do you do about it. Many companies will set up redundant system, to reduce the risk of total failure. One thing I know some is companies have is redundant Internet connections, as I set them up. They'd have one connection via ADSL or cable and the other via the cell network.
 
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