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Discussion Starter #1
I have 3 coax outlets in my home (with attached coax cables), but only one of them is live with a Rogers signal. Does that mean the other two cannot connect at all with the live one? I would like to feed an OTA signal from one of dead ones to view on the live one (no OTA signal here). I would cancel Rogers if that would work. Thanks.
 

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Hook up a TV to the cable, to see if there's any signal. Of course, you could always check the other end, to see if it's connected to anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. There is no Rogers signal, but I was wondering if it's still possible the coax cable is still good for connections. I can't check where the cable ends as it goes into the wall and my home is finished.
 

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If you cannot find the other end, how are you going to feed an OTA Signal down it.?
 

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It sounds like you want to add OTA to your Rogers cable line. As far as I know you can't. A switch would be the only option but the location is going to be a problem.

But if you don't know where the lines end how are you going to connect an antenna?
 

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If you can't reach the other end, how do you propose to use it for OTA?

BTW, you can use a device referred to as a "toner" that puts some noise on a wire, so that it can be traced with a receiver. I've used those with phone circuits, but they should work with coax, provided you connect to the shield and ground.
 

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The disconnected cables might go to another box. They often just loop from box to box. The solution in that case would be to install a splitter in the live box to feed the others.
 

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As far as I know you can't.
Definitely can't. Some of the frequencies used by OTA are used by Rogers and some of the frequencies used by Rogers are used by other services. Connecting an antenna to the Rogers cable will likely result in interference both to you and others in your neighbourhood. It will also put Rogers in violation of federal law.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It sounds like you want to add OTA to your Rogers cable line. As far as I know you can't. A switch would be the only option but the location is going to be a problem.

But if you don't know where the lines end how are you going to connect an antenna?
Yes, that's exactly what I want to do. I just assumed that at one time, all the coax outlets were receiving Rogers signals so that they all must be connected somewhere somehow. I was hoping that I could connect an antenna with a USB tuner card onto a Revo (or something like that) onto one of the "dead" outlets and somehow I would be able to watch TV on another outlet (i.e., the current Rogers live one). Wishful thinking I guess...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Definitely can't. Some of the frequencies used by OTA are used by Rogers and some of the frequencies used by Rogers are used by other services. Connecting an antenna to the Rogers cable will likely result in interference both to you and others in your neighbourhood. It will also put Rogers in violation of federal law.
Well, I was hoping that if it worked, I could just cancel Rogers.
 

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If you cancel Rogers, you can use the coax for OTA. You just can't do both at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you cancel Rogers, you can use the coax for OTA. You just can't do both at the same time.
Ok, but the problem is that I want to know if the coax cables are somehow connected right now! :( If they are not, then I would investigate alternative OTA solutions. The problem is that there is no OTA signal where the TV is.
 

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I could just cancel Rogers
That will work 100% of the time. ;) If you want to utilize your cables for OTA that is very doable. The only thing you should do is find where the cable signal comes into the house and see if there is a splitter. It is there you can add your OTA cable and you should have OTA on your old Rogers outlet.

OTA is not plug-n-play so I assume you know how to get it up and running. Location, pointing, pre-amps etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That will work 100% of the time. ;) If you want to utilize your cables for OTA that is very doable. The only thing you should do is find where the cable signal comes into the house and see if there is a splitter. It is there you can add your OTA cable and you should have OTA on your old Rogers outlet.

OTA is not plug-n-play so I assume you know how to get it up and running. Location, pointing, pre-amps etc.
There does not seem to be a splitter, but I'll check again. What I remember seeing coming into the house is a plate with just one outlet, and a cable from that that plugs directly into the TV (or surge protector in this case). If there is no splitter, can I add one (after I've dumped Rogers) to connect to the antenna? The problem with this solution, however, is that there will be cables all over the place. That's why I want to know if there are cables that already exist for me to use. Assuming that the previous household had 3 Rogers outlets, if we are only paying for one right now, how does Rogers cut off the other two? Do they physically disconnect them, or is it done from their end?

I've fiddled a bit with OTA so I know what I'm getting into. Unfortunately, I am not getting too many channels as I can only use an indoor antenna on the 2nd floor.
 

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Ok, but the problem is that I want to know if the coax cables are somehow connected right now!
If you're handy with a multimeter, you can check to see if the cable is open or has some resistance between the shield and center conductor. If open, then it's likely not connected to something. Again though, you'll have to know where the other ends are, if you're going to use those cables.

There does not seem to be a splitter, but I'll check again.
If your home is a house, check around the electrical panel. You may find something there, as utilities such as cable and phone lines require a nearby ground point.
 

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If you only have one TV, and no broadband internet or Rogers Home phone, then it's possible there is no splitter after the Rogers box outside the home. It's also possible that there is a splitter inside the Rogers box outside the home, however, then you'd likely see several cables coming into the home.

As mentioned earlier, have a look at the demarcation point inside your home (usually at the electrical panel) and see what RF-coax cables you can see there. Usually the ones that lead to other outlets in various rooms come to this area and you should be able to find them there (they may be tucked away and you may need to look closely)
 

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Like I said, check behind the cable outlets. Some cable installations are looped from box to box. Other good places to check are where the cable enters the house, unfinished rooms (such as where the furnace is) and near the electrical panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sorry for the late reply, but I think I've figured out where the cables meet. If I look outside, I see that both cables come out from their respective holes in the brickwork and meet at the Rogers cable box. Since the box is locked, do I have no way of finding out if they truly meet? If I end up cancelling Rogers, will I then have access to this box to connect the two cables?
 

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Rogers owns the box. If possible, simply pull the cables out of the box and connect them with a barrel connector. Barring that, simply cut the cables and route them inside or install your own box. Be sure to use watertight compression connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Rogers owns the box. If possible, simply pull the cables out of the box and connect them with a barrel connector. Barring that, simply cut the cables and route them inside or install your own box. Be sure to use watertight compression connectors.
Thanks. But if I pull the cables out right now, that means I'd be physically disconnecting the Rogers feed, right (since I am still subscribing to their service right now)? And it it really as simple as just pulling the cables out of the box? Would I be destroying Rogers property (e.g., destroying something within the box that is attached to the cables)?

Also, could you post an image of what these watertight compression connectors look like? Thanks again.
 
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