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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, looking for some help on this, setup goes like this bell via component\optical to hk avr 347, hdmi to tv. I dont use hdmi with bell 9242, too many issues. Now I'd like to hook up a graphic equalizer with my setup but dont know whats my best solution. Only option i see now is remove my optical feed and use rca to the equalizer then to the avr but i dont like this option as it will only enhance the sound of the bell box and not the blu ray or external components i use. Any help?
 

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I looked at you're receiver online, you have analog ins and outs on that unit, so you could wire an eq for front L/R, or 5 channels of EQ (needing at least 3 separate eq's) using all of the analog in/outs. Probably not the best idea. I love my H/K, but for my upstairs theater I use an avr with a full Audyssey suite that provides a 5 band EQ per speaker. Might be easier for you to go this route. You're HK will have good retained value on the used market, and credible receivers with an Audyssey setup can be had for ~$500.
 

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Thing I don't understand is if I take a set of RCA from out on my receiver and second set of RCA and go back in to the receiver, first where do I go back in? Second for example if Im on video 1 and the audio is coming from a optical source or hdmi really regardless how does the receiver know to bypass and use the loop I created with the EQ?
I love the amp it's got solid power, but want to tune the sound to my desire.
 

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Hi, I think the answer is you can't.

You need pre-out/ main-in to insert an equalizer. As others have said, either use the built-in tone (your avr has bass, treble) or get a pre-amp and amp separates which will allow you to insert an equalizer.

However, what exactly are you trying to change/ achieve and have you tried the tone controls.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What I'm trying to achieve is better sound from my stereo setup. I have the bass and treble at max. When I hook up my laptop to my hk and start playing some music well most playback programs have built in EQ. When I tweak it I can make the living room shake from my two towers. No I don't expect that from an EQ processing sound from my bell box but I'm sure it would make a huge difference. If I were to go to a pre/EQ/amp setup, it sure wouldnt be for my living room that sounds more like a setup for my theatre room. I found a vector research EQ on kijiji and guy is selling for $30. Thought why not if I can make it work with my setup.
 

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Many mid to high range stereo amplifiers have a pre-out/main-in loop. They are usually equipped with jumpers from the factory. Just remove the jumpers and hook up the equalizer. Another option would be to use a tape in/out loop (often labeled Tape Monitor.) Press the Tape Monitor button to switch the equalizer in and out.
 

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The loop between the preamp and power amp, if it exists is the only solution as that would be the only analogue portion of the amplification chain that receives an analogue signal for the power amp to deliver to the speakers. I ran into this with our Panasonic HE-70 AVR. The analogue and digital signals are kept completely separate until they reach the amplifier stages. I haven't done an internet search, but I'm sure there are digital mixers / EQ units that can accept an optical / coax spdif and tinker with it and output a digital signal likewise. Your problems will be, cost, complexity and DRM (digital rights management) that could be present on the digital audio feeds.

Normally, Dolby Digital and dts streams don't anticipate a consumer fiddling with the various response curves and if a very large LFE signal blasted through to the sub, and got magnified by over-EQ, say goodbye to the sub, that normally wouldn't happen. :)

It's interesting what you want to do, but with so much meddling that goes on in the broadcast chain these days, trying to out-guess the sources can have it's ramifications.

Cameron
 

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If it's more bass you're looking for, you could try adding a sub. I think it will give you that 'slam in the chest' bass better than an equalizer (which will be difficult to integrate in your current setup anyway).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yaa I know a sub would probably do what I'm looking for, trust me I know bass, I have a Velodyne, shacks the house,, but the EQ was the right price and if it were possible to use, it could of been fun. The tape monitor loop looked like my closest option, but I cant find any button or setting in the menu to make a loop out of it and I know for a fact I dont have a pre out\main amp in loop behind the avr 347. Thanks for the help though.
 

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Not all amps will have a tape monitor loop that works correctly with all signals. Any I have seem were implemented as a second set of tape plugs labeled Tape Monitor or Tape 2. If there is just one set of tape plugs, it might not work the desired way.

CamDAB, we are talking about a stereo amp/receiver which are typically analog only devices with no secure digital paths.
 

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CamDAB, we are talking about a stereo amp/receiver which are typically analog only devices with no secure digital paths.
At one time, they were completely analogue, correct. Our Panasonic HE-70, of 2000-2001 vintage has both analogue and digital inputs and a tape loop to boot. :) But what's analogue, stays analogue, and what's digital stays digital, no crossover between the two technologies. Most inputs have a corresponding digital input. The tape loop can only pick up signals from the analogue section inputs. This receiver has DD 5.1 and dts 5.1 decoding via two optical and one coaxial spdif inputs. None of those show up at any of the analogue outputs except the speaker terminals.

As to whether any of the spdif paths are secure, that I can't say for sure. I do know that when a Dolby Digital 5.1 stream is received, the enhancement section providing for various hall and ambiance effects are effectively disabled. Dolby 2.0 and anything less than a 5.0 stream allows the enhancement effects to be used, so yes, some flags are present in the digital audio stream.

Hope I've cleared up some things... :)

Cameron
 
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