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Hi!

I recently get the FTTH from Bell (I used to have FTTN previously).

One strange thing that happen is the when i connect the VIP2502 wireless receiver through an Wired network connection, the HH3000 starts to reboot constantly (up 2-5 mins). If i remove the wire and let the VIP 2502 connect wirelessly, it is all fine. I had a tech come in to check but the only thing he keeps telling be is that i should only use it wireless.

I used to be able to run this setup when a was FTTN using the HH2000. But then the HH2000 did not have a built in 5g for the receiver... the HH3000 does

Here is my theory, i think i have a broadcast storm situation where the receiver is connected to the wired network AND possibly automatically connected as well via the wireless.... thus creating a "Loop"

What are your toughts??? And fix possible? How to explain this to BELL????? :) ANy way of disabling the Fibe tV 5G transmitter (not the WIFI one)

Syl
 

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...If i remove the wire and let the VIP 2502 connect wirelessly, it is all fine. I had a tech come in to check but the only thing he keeps telling be is that i should only use it wireless.
Why not follow the tech's advice if wireless works?

The HH3000 has 3 separate radios - one 5 GHz for TV, one 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz for internet, so using wireless TV will have no impact on internet traffic.
P.S. I've heard before that wired doesn't always work on the VIP 2502, but I don't have any further details.
 

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I'd say that tech is full of it. People have been using both wired and wireless connections since WiFi has been available. Also, a "broadcast storm" is not likely, as a computer with both wired and wireless connections, to the same network, will choose the wired one. This is due to something called "metric". To see this (in Windows), connect your computer with both wired and wireless connections. Then, at the command prompt, enter "route print". On the right side of the output, you'll see a metric value for the wired connection. Mine is 291. Then disconnect the cable and do that command again. This time you will see the metric for the wireless connection. Mine is 311. Since routing is done according to the lowest metric, the wired connection will be used when available, otherwise wireless. This eliminates the possibility of a broadcast storm. A broadcast storm generally results when you connect multiple switches, so that a loop is formed. Spanning tree protocol or similar is used to block a loop from forming. A computer with 2 interfaces, such as this, does not make a bridge, unless specifically configured for it. Therefore, it won't participate in forming a loop that could lead to broadcast storms.

If you don't have such a loop, then the problem is likely in that 3000.

BTW, I've worked with both the 1000 and 3000 in my work, at business customers where WiFi is frequenly used along with wired connections, and have never seen such a problem.
 

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I'm with the tech on this one. It's easy to create a loop with cheap consumer grade equipment and connecting with both wired and wireless is one way to do it. Use either wired or wireless with the VIP2502, not both. The 3000 should detect the loop and neutralize it. But, again, we are talking about a cheap piece of consumer grade equipment, not a well designed business class router with loop detection.
 

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^^^^
Using wired and WiFi is not the way to do it. Loops require switches that a) are configured with multiple paths and b) do not have spanning tree protocol or similar to prevent loops. Just having WiFi and Ethernet connections on a computer will not do it. In order to turn a computer into a bridge or switch requires specific configuration. While that can be done on Linux, I don't know that it can be done on Windows, other than perhaps server versions. Perhaps you should investigate how networks actually work to understand what's happening. Again, people have been using WiFi and Ethernet together for almost 20 years. Why is it suddenly a problem now? Right now, my notebook is connected by both Ethernet and WiFi, as it often is, yet no problem at all.
 

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For starters, the OP is using a VIP 2502, not a PC. In the second place, I didn't say it was by using wifi and wired ethernet on a PC. In the third place, I said it was with cheap consumer grade switches or routers, aka unmanaged switches, that cannot be programmed. Enough said.
 

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It shouldn't make any difference whether a VIP 2502 or not. As for switches, etc., as long as there are no loops, there should be no problem. If that device is designed to work over Wifi or Ethernet and this happens, then there's a problem with the equipment Bell provided. They should be fixing or replacing it, instead of the tech saying to use only WiFi. That's not a fix. It's the tech not doing his job.


Do others with that equipment have the same problem?
 
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