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What bothers me is they are just making movies for the sake of making movies now. They are throwing them out left and right and they know damn well what movies will be bombs and what will make money but they continue too pump out trashy movies that they know won't make any money at the box office more so then not.

Then the greedy idiots decide too put ticket prices up knowing full well the economy in the US is horrible, millions of people losing there homes and jobs but do they care, not one damn bit. "Lets jack up the prices even more and drain the rest of the blood out of people"....
 

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Just like the music industry, they're relying far too much on the CGI post-production effects. There's no focus on writing what-so-ever. Most of the movies are trying to wow with the effects...however the stories and writing are terrible. We know what they can do with the effects- the possibilities are endless. However without a supporting plot, the movie will bomb.
 

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Bad movies = bad ticket sales.
Then how do you explain $103 million box office so far for Little Fockers?

There doesn't seem to be much correlation between the quality of movies and their box office success. If that was the case, then Winter's Bone, which made numerous critics' Top Ten lists, would be a blockbuster; how many here saw it?

Here's a thought; how about improving the movie-going experience? With so many people now owning large flat-panel televisions, dvd and blu-ray players, it's easier, more relaxing and cheaper to wait for a movie's rental or On-Demand window.

Going to the suburban multi-plex is to exercise in sensory overload and pocketbook gouging. Once we've run the gauntlet of careening kids, noisy video arcades, long lines because half the ticket kiosks don't work at any given time, and horribly over-priced junk food concessions, and are safely ensconced in the darkened theater, we then have to endure a barrage of commercials and too-frequent projection issues because all the trained professional projectionists have been driven out of their jobs in favour of a minimum-wage kid pushing a button who has no clue about proper framing and multi-track audio. And the ongoing consolidation of exhibitors ensures almost no competition, no incentive for them to improve or offer a different experience, or a broader range of movie options.

Baseball attendance suffered when nearly every team played in huge, soulless concrete multi-purpose stadiums. But since teams started building baseball-specific stadiums that made the experience of attending a game more unique, more in tune with the languid nature of baseball, the game has regained popularity. Perhaps it's time companies like Cineplex, Landmark and AMC take note.
 

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That cost leaped from an average of $7.46 a ticket in 2009 to $7.85 last year, the largest single-year spike on record.
I wonder where they are getting those ticket prices. Regular prices for ticket in NYC hit $20 last year. Theater tickets here are $14.25. A family of four is looking at a minimum of $52 + tax for a single movie, a couple $28.50. Compare that to a $6 Blu-ray rental or HD PPV.

Post theater run sales are becoming an increasingly larger portion of the market. Movies like Winter's Bone do much better in rentals and disc sales than they do at theaters. Movies that appeal to younger audience still do well at the box office but that may change as home theater technology becomes more ubiquitous.
 

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Avatar is a bigger mystery.
Broad appeal plus lots of hype equals big ticket sales. James Cameron's involvement is a big draw as well. Compared to any of the Focker movies, Avatar is a masterpiece.
 

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My comment has been mostly stated already, but the christmas season was underwhelming for good releases. I'm not surprised to see sales down.
 

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Just like the music industry, they're relying far too much on the CGI post-production effects. There's no focus on writing what-so-ever. Most of the movies are trying to wow with the effects...however the stories and writing are terrible. We know what they can do with the effects- the possibilities are endless. However without a supporting plot, the movie will bomb.
That's why I'm finding the selection of indie or low budget or UK films that Netflix is providing is sometimes just as good (or in some cases equally as bad) as the "Hollywood Blockbusters".
 

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Agree with the all of the above. I recently watched two of the 'big hits' from this year - Inception and The Social Network, both in theatres.

Now I enjoy good speculative fiction better than anything else, so I really looked forward to Inception. While it had its moments, the writing just had so many holes. CGI was OK, but it can't take the place of a proper storyline. Suspension of disbelief is fine, but the story itself has to have some internal consistency. Too many writers watching too many episodes of Lost?

Social Network was OK, but no big deal. Again, it stands out because the rest are so poor

Avatar was immersive, but the writing and characterization was right out of Left Wing Comic Book 101. That's OK, that one I was there for the CGI only and I parked my brain at the door.

The Fockers I think can be explained in three ways:

- television advertising for this has been beyond anything I've ever seen. I rarely watch commercial based television, but I was stunned by the sheer volume of spots for this drivel during the NFL games. Real push strategy here.

- a content vacuum this Christmas, nothing else stood out;

and the old reliable....

- public taste. Evidently it's what a lot of people want to spend $ on.

BTW, isn't that a clever play on words? Little Fockers(italic on Fockers). Who ever would have thought of that? Get it? (visualize head shaking)

On Netflix - while I don't agree that the catalogue is that good - overall it's mediocre at best, although the January 1 dump of new titles was great - there are some gems. Four that I highly recommend - Damages, Larry Sanders, House of Cards and Kidnapped. The latter has me absorbed right now. FYI http://www.nbc.com/Kidnapped/ and preview Ep 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUoRB9qLD6w

Frankly, the video I watch now is mainly non-theatrical - Mi5/Spooks, Fringe, Kidnapped, Damages, The Wire. Movies - particularly movie in theatres where you are the mercy of the cellphone and audiences talking to each other during the film - are falling off my radar.
 

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I believe the quality of movies has a lot to do with the viewing audience. I don't really have any empirical evidence other than my own observations, but I believe the majority of movie going public are the under 25 crowd, teenagers and young adults out dating and I think this is how you get a movie like the Fockers making so much money. I believe Adam Sandler's whole career is based on this.

Personally, I'm a patient person and there haven't been a whole lot of movies that I couldn't wait for the rental and enjoy it on my modest home theatre. As the others pointed out, it's blatant gouging of movie goers with concession and ticket prices and the abuse I deal with having to sit through 10 minutes of commercials before the over priced movie just because I get there on time to get a decent seat.

The final factor for me has been the revelation this year that the local theatre here has been infested with bed bugs and I will never set foot in there and sit on their seats just to carry them home. I've heard of other areas dealing with the same issues in their theatres.
 

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Then how do you explain $103 million box office so far for Little Fockers?

There doesn't seem to be much correlation between the quality of movies and their box office success. If that was the case, then Winter's Bone, which made numerous critics' Top Ten lists, would be a blockbuster; how many here saw it?

Here's a thought; how about improving the movie-going experience? With so many people now owning large flat-panel televisions, dvd and blu-ray players, it's easier, more relaxing and cheaper to wait for a movie's rental or On-Demand window.

Going to the suburban multi-plex is to exercise in sensory overload and pocketbook gouging. Once we've run the gauntlet of careening kids, noisy video arcades, long lines because half the ticket kiosks don't work at any given time, and horribly over-priced junk food concessions, and are safely ensconced in the darkened theater, we then have to endure a barrage of commercials and too-frequent projection issues because all the trained professional projectionists have been driven out of their jobs in favour of a minimum-wage kid pushing a button who has no clue about proper framing and multi-track audio. And the ongoing consolidation of exhibitors ensures almost no competition, no incentive for them to improve or offer a different experience, or a broader range of movie options.

Baseball attendance suffered when nearly every team played in huge, soulless concrete multi-purpose stadiums. But since teams started building baseball-specific stadiums that made the experience of attending a game more unique, more in tune with the languid nature of baseball, the game has regained popularity. Perhaps it's time companies like Cineplex, Landmark and AMC take note.
The first film, Meet The Parents is a classic, and the second was well above average.

People are now invested in the characters and the story, starring some A-list actors.

It may turn out that this 3rd movie is a dog, but based on the facts, why wouldn't Little Fockers have a solid box office opening?
 

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Agree with the all of the above. I recently watched two of the 'big hits' from this year - Inception and The Social Network, both in theatres.

Now I enjoy good speculative fiction better than anything else, so I really looked forward to Inception. While it had its moments, the writing just had so many holes. CGI was OK, but it can't take the place of a proper storyline. Suspension of disbelief is fine, but the story itself has to have some internal consistency. Too many writers watching too many episodes of Lost?

Social Network was OK, but no big deal. Again, it stands out because the rest are so poor

Avatar was immersive, but the writing and characterization was right out of Left Wing Comic Book 101. That's OK, that one I was there for the CGI only and I parked my brain at the door.

The Fockers I think can be explained in three ways:

- television advertising for this has been beyond anything I've ever seen. I rarely watch commercial based television, but I was stunned by the sheer volume of spots for this drivel during the NFL games. Real push strategy here.

- a content vacuum this Christmas, nothing else stood out;

and the old reliable....

- public taste. Evidently it's what a lot of people want to spend $ on.

BTW, isn't that a clever play on words? Little Fockers(italic on Fockers). Who ever would have thought of that? Get it? (visualize head shaking)

On Netflix - while I don't agree that the catalogue is that good - overall it's mediocre at best, although the January 1 dump of new titles was great - there are some gems. Four that I highly recommend - Damages, Larry Sanders, House of Cards and Kidnapped. The latter has me absorbed right now. FYI http://www.nbc.com/Kidnapped/ and preview Ep 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUoRB9qLD6w

Frankly, the video I watch now is mainly non-theatrical - Mi5/Spooks, Fringe, Kidnapped, Damages, The Wire. Movies - particularly movie in theatres where you are the mercy of the cellphone and audiences talking to each other during the film - are falling off my radar.
Did you watch the same Inception? The Christopher Nolan one? Because if you did, you'd know the CGI is pretty understated, and the whole film is a deep and rich story, laden with superb storytelling, and the stories pay off on multiple levels over multiple viewings. On a superficial viewing, it might appear there are plot holes, but on more discerning inspection those turn out not to be holes at all, but deeper connections between the layered stories. That's what makes it such a powerful work.

Your offhand comment:

"Too many writers watching too many episodes of Lost?"
is equally facepalming. Did you know the main Inception story was written by a single person, back in 2001, years before the first episode of Lost was even filmed?

It's OK not to like a film, but when the criticism don't match the actual film's weaknesses, it raises questions. It's like saying there was too much slapstick in Schindler's List or that you didn't like Wizard of Oz because it was in black and white.

I do fully agree that there's not much draw in attending the movie theaters anymore. The value for money is dubious, the quality is inconsistent, and some spectators can ruin the show.
 

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I used to only go to theatres when i was in a less-than-interesting city on business travel, but in the iPad era, even that's gone out the window.

I agree with much of what @Nels Stewart said, with the exception of unionized projectionists. That's one union that just didn't need to exist.

The commercials just infuriate me...I've timed upwards of 20 minutes of them. The food is horrible...is it too much to ask to sell me a Crown me a Coke?
Any finally, why cant i order preassigned seating online instead of playing seat lotto? That should be an easy fix. Hell, they could even charge for the premium locations...
 

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My local Cineplex (The Queensway) now has something called AVX. (Audio Visual Experience). It's $3 more and has a large screen (almost Imax like), terrific sound and larger leather recline seats. It is reserved seating. You pick your seat when you buy your ticket. It was great when I saw Harry potter there but actually that's what you should get for the regular price not for extra. They are basically saying their other theatres are crap.
 

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We have that in Calgary as well. I find it too loud and the screen and chair size basically what I'd expect anyway. So I think it's really just a scam to charge $3 more without even having 3d.
 
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