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Looking for a new cable internet provider in Ontario, then check this out.

The difference is especially astounding when we look at what has been Rogers most popular internet plan - Extreme.

The Rogers Extreme high speed internet plan costs $59.99 per month and offers 15 Mbps download speeds and a 80 GB usage cap which works out to 75 cents per Gigabyte.

Compare that to the Teksavvy Extreme plan which costs $42.95 per month, offers the same 15 Mbps download speeds and a massive 300 GB usage cap which works out to just 14 cents per gigabyte.

On an absolute basis, the Teksavvy Extreme plan is $17 a month cheaper than Rogers Extreme and on a per gigabyte basis is more than 80 percent cheaper.
 

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Hugh, I have a big problem with this article. My issue is that you quote the pricing on the web sites, but how many people actually pay these prices? From asking around, I've determined that people pay exactly what Teksavvy posts. With Rogers, very few people I know pay the al-la-carte pricing on the web site.

This past Wednesday, the promotions on my Rogers account expired, so I gave them a call to renegotiate my pricing. I expected to have to threaten to cancel and speak to a retention specialist to get anywhere. I was surprised when the front line rep offered me a 30% discount off list price and no rental fee on the modem. With the 5% off for bundling with cable, my express internet is $30.55 per month. While I know my data transfer cap is lower than at Teksavvy, I have only once gone over the cap since they were implements, and I am not restricting my use of the internet. I did have to agree to a 1-year contract for this pricing, but in my case that's no big deal. (It's outside the scope of this discussion, but the 30% also applies to my cable as well, and I have two PVRs and two HD digital boxes in the house, and I don't pay a penny for any of those.) All I had to do was ask.

Teksavvy is a great deal for those that need the bigger download caps, but for people who are on Rogers already and are happy with the service, I'd recommend at least asking what they can do for you on pricing before you go through the hassle of shopping around. And if you are shopping around, make sure that you're comparing what you will actually have to pay and not just the list pricing. The bigger ISPs will always offer you something similar to the others to get your business or keep your business (heavy downloaders excluded).
 

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One other thing worth noting is Rogers just announced they are increasing their speeds and caps. The new caps will slightly lower Rogers' $/GB but TekSavvy will still be way better value. More importantly, the Express and Extreme speeds are moving from 10Mbps and 15Mbps to 12Mbps and 24Mbps respectively so we should get the same speed increases from TekSavvy. I also wouldn't be surprised to see TekSavvy raise their caps another 100GB just to show up Rogers' measly 20GB cap increase for their Extreme tier, much like they did shortly after the UBB reversal when they increased their cap from 200GB to the now 300GB.
 

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My issue is that you quote the pricing on the web sites, but how many people actually pay these prices?
Would you prefer I make the rates up? Those are the advertised rates and that is the rate I was quoted. I have Bell TV and Primus Phone and those are the best prices I can get. Unless everyone can get the "deals" its best to stick with advertised.


Grog, new caps and d/l speeds are not yet in effect AND only apply to SOME customers. My suspicion is TS will see their speeds go up too so its a bit of wash. I will likely update in late August when the dust settles but even with the new announcement, TS is still much cheaper
 

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In order to make the article more equitable, at least the author could mention that the pricing on Rogers can be negotiated down quite a bit depending on your situation. Otherwise it's comparing apples and oranges. Many magazines today quote both list and "deal/negotiated" pricing.

If the actual "deal" pricing is not provided or estimated, then the article does a disservice to people shopping for a plan. I'm also with Rogers and get my Express service for Teksavvy pricing (except for the higher download cap) which, as mentioned by kanatamike is of no value for the vast majority of customers.

So, in summary, if you're a heavy user and don't wish to negotiate with Rogers, or aren't with a Rogers package, then Teksavvy is a good alternative. If, however, you wish to negotiate with Rogers and are under their caps, there is no "clear winner" as inferred by the article.

When I comparison shop for a vehicle or anything else, the "list price" is of absolutely no value to me and an article comparing list prices is also no value to me. I would almost consider the author a "shill" for leaving out such valuable information as the actual pricing one can negotiate with both companies (or at least mentioning that one provider's rates are quite flexible while the other provider's are not.)

Another item that is not mentioned for Rogers customers is the package pricing that can be negotiated on an overall package including say internet, cable, home phone and cell phone, where the savings are not only on the internet, but significant for the overall package, which a lot of people have.
 

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I have no big problem with the article. I'll factor in a 20% advantage to Rogers for bundles discounts, plus some unpublished value-addeds (20gigs extra bandwidth). Also factor in the contract that you have to agree to with Rogers to get the 20% added value, and I'd still say Teksavvy is the clear winner.

A year ago, I didn't get near my 60 gigabyte limit very much. We still aren't a very tech-y family. We have Netflix & we watch TV content from Youtube and TV network web sites. And last month we got to 80gigs easily and that was with rationing. My point is there must be a very large cohort of people out there who months ago never would have gotten close to 60 gigs/month. And probably a few months from now this huge cohort of 'regular' people are all suddenly going to discover their internet is not sufficient.

With the latest changes to the good people at Rogers' bandwidth limits, I suspect it's starting to happen. So nice of them to suddlenly give me an extra 20 gigs for $5. I wish they had been so reasonable a few months ago when I went over by four gigs. Those $8 were the last punishment fees I was ever going to give them. Now I only give them my pound of flesh via Teksavvy.
 

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In order to make the article more equitable, at least the author could mention that the pricing on Rogers can be negotiated down quite a bit depending on your situation.
Well, I don't know how you negotiate prices with Rogers.

Before I went with Teksavvy, i called and the prices on the website were the prices they quoted. I told them I was looking at both TS and Rogers and said that I was looking for the best deal and they told me the prices on the website.

I told them I would go with TS if they couldn't lower the price and they said no way.

So with all due respect, those are the prices for internet service!
 

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Well, I don't know how you negotiate prices with Rogers.
Per the pricing threads in the Rogers forum, it's very easy for people with Rogers to negotiate 10-30% discounts on their entire package with Rogers, depending on what that package is and their negotiating skills. I'd say the average we have seen in those pricing threads is about a 20% discount (on their entire package). In order to get that pricing, one needs to commit to at least a one year "contract" with Rogers. If one leaves before that one year is out, the penalty for doing so is not very severe and at worst is to pay the difference between the discounted price and the list price for the time they had the most recent discount, often with a $50 or so maximum liability.
 

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The prices in the article are not for "packages". The prices are for the internet service and are what a new subscriber would pay for the service as a standalone offering.

"Bundle" pricing is not an apples to apples comparison.

Again, I will repeat, I was not offered any "deals" when I contacted Rogers.
 

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I dread the annual call to Rogers where I am at the mercy of the CSR at Rogers and their current promotions or retention offers. More fuel for the 'switch' debate for sure.
 

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I think the non-discounted prices are a fair comparison. That is what most people end up paying, if not now, eventually. I went trough the discount BS with another service. If you don't call, they raise the price and they eventually decrease the discounts, stop discounting completely or call your bluff. It's like saying store ABC is cheaper than store XYZ because ABC has a sale once a year. The fact is ABC is still more expensive for most people most of the time.
 

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I wish cars, airline tickets, and internet weren't negotiable in terms of pricing. I consider that another strike against Rogers.

The people who don't possess that getting-the-best-deal-for-myself-possible gene end up paying more -- and they are the more compliant customers that probably take up less of Rogers' resources (customer service / sales calls, etc.).

I am now even more on-side with Hugh's use of Rogers' published pricing figures.
 

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The prices are for the internet service and are what a new subscriber would pay for the service as a standalone offering.
Fine, but is there anyone on this forum who only has internet? I'm betting the vast majority do have cable (or sat), home phones, cell phones, so the price of the overall package is relevant.

If I go into various stores and wish to purchase a TV an AVR a BD player and speakers, I look at what the overall cost for these items will be. I may end up at several stores, or I may decide to deal with one store.

I dread the annual call to Rogers
Many people dread the hassle of changing providers.

I wish cars, airline tickets, and internet weren't negotiable in terms of pricing.
The fact is that they are. You can decide if/how you wish to negotiate.

The fact is ABC is still more expensive for most people most of the time.
The other fact is that some (patient?) people may wait for that once-a-year sale and that fact was not mentioned in the article. Many people wait for boxing day, others do not. That doesn't negate the fact that boxing day exists.
 

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IMHO, bundling is a non-issue as well. I don't want to be forced to obtain all services from the same provider to get a better price. Shopping for services that fit my needs at the best price is usually cheaper anyway. Why should I have to make every purchase at the same store to get a 10% discount when other stores sell the same or better products 15% cheaper all the time? The easy availability of discounts and alternate deals just proves that Rogers' pricing is inflated to begin with.
 

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I think a good measure of fairness would be to consider how an independent body would gather data in terms of pricing if it were conducting a survey; using published rates would seem to be the reasonable thing to do - it's posted for everyone to see, meaning all the service providers are measured the same way.

It becomes a rather messy exercise getting accurate, objective data once you start throwing in bundling or better 'deals' one might be able to acquire negotiating with a CSR over the phone. The task of performing price comparisons between providers would be close to impossible in these cases.
 

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I only have internet.
You don't have a phone of any kind? (even a VOIP phone?)

BTW, I'm not promoting any particular provider, or any one particular way of doing things, I'm simply saying that an article that totally neglects the pricing that is possible is somewhat misleading (to me). It appears from many responses here that people don't seem to care about possible pricing, only published pricing. To those people all I have to say is - is that how you purchase your car?

The task of performing price comparisons between providers would be close to impossible in these cases.
Difficult perhaps and that's what the providers want - confused customers, but are customers that only see "published" prices informed customers? I'm here to inform, not mislead - the occasional caveat is information too.
 

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Would you prefer I make the rates up?
Of course not, but mentioning that Rogers' rates are highly negotiable would have been sufficient. Quoting the significant available data (as found in these forums) would have been a step better. The article is misleading by ommission for the people that don't reach their bandwidth caps.

Before I went with Teksavvy, i called and the prices on the website were the prices they quoted.
While I have no doubt you're telling the truth about this, I find it surprising as it is contrary to my experience over the past 10 years or so. Rogers almost always has promotions for new customers, especially if they are luring you away from a competitor (read: Bell). Maybe there are certain "key words" that have to come out of your mouth on the call which trigger the rep's offer of promotions. I dunno.....
 

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It's like saying store ABC is cheaper than store XYZ because ABC has a sale once a year.
It's not like that at all. It's like saying store ABC is cheaper than store XYZ because ABC has a sale twelve times a year, right on the day your bill is generated. :)
 
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