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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a way to get NAT Loopback or NAT Haripinning on the HH3000 or can there be a complete replacement of this router?
 

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I know what loop back and hair pinning are, but what are you trying to do? Loop backs, as used with other communications devices does not work with Ethernet or IP.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am trying to setup a personal Ark Survivor Cluster and I cannot connect to my cluster inside my LAN. But people can connect through the cluster through the WAN side just not LAN because the Lack of NAT Loopback.
 

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Unfortunately, the HH3K is 'internet for idiots', while it makes everything run smoothly, and is an all-in-one device(ONT/battery/router), it leaves a lot to be desired for more advanced users. That combined with the broken Advanced DMZ, not great for anyone that wants to do any extra with their connection. My only suggestion for your situation would be to add a hosts file entry if your issue is with DNS, that way it just points to your internal IP with the same DNS name.
 

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NAT Loopback
What, precisely, do you mean by NAT Loopback? In all the years I've been working with LANs, going back to 1978 I've never heard of such a thing. BTW, I am also a Cisco CCNA. I know what a loop back is in telecom and I've often used them, but never in a LAN.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Taken from Wikipedia

NAT loopback

NAT loopback, also known as NAT hairpinning or NAT reflection,[11] is a feature in many consumer routers[12] which permits the access of a service via the public IP address from inside the local network. This eliminates the need for using separate domain name resolution for hosts inside the network than for the public network for a website.

The following describes an example network:

Public address: 203.0.113.1. This is the address of the WAN interface on the router.
Internal address of router: 192.168.1.1
Address of the server: 192.168.1.2
Address of a local computer: 192.168.1.100

If a packet is sent to the public address by a computer at 192.168.1.100, the packet would normally be routed to the default gateway (the router), unless an explicit route is set in the computer's routing tables. A router with the NAT loopback feature detects that 203.0.113.1 is the address of its WAN interface, and treats the packet as if coming from that interface. It determines the destination for that packet, based on DNAT (port forwarding) rules for the destination. If the data were sent to port 80 and a DNAT rule exists for port 80 directed to 192.168.1.2, then the host at that address receives the packet.

If no applicable DNAT rule is available, the router drops the packet. An ICMP Destination Unreachable reply may be sent. If any DNAT rules were present, address translation is still in effect; the router still rewrites the source IP address in the packet. The local computer (192.168.1.100) sends the packet as coming from 192.168.1.100, but the server (192.168.1.2) receives it as coming from 203.0.113.1. When the server replies, the process is identical as for an external sender. Thus, two-way communication is possible between hosts inside the LAN network via the public IP address.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unfortunately, the HH3K is 'internet for idiots', while it makes everything run smoothly, and is an all-in-one device(ONT/battery/router), it leaves a lot to be desired for more advanced users. That combined with the broken Advanced DMZ, not great for anyone that wants to do any extra with their connection. My only suggestion for your situation would be to add a hosts file entry if your issue is with DNS, that way it just points to your internal IP with the same DNS name.
I already added to my host file for some reason the other server is still not showing up.
 

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NAT loopback, also known as NAT hairpinning or NAT reflection,
I am familiar with the term reflection, but that situation is generally avoided by using the local address to access local devices. The DNS is configured to provide the local addreses on the local interface. I do that here on my home network.
 

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I am familiar with the term reflection, but that situation is generally avoided by using the local address to access local devices. The DNS is configured to provide the local addreses on the local interface. I do that here on my home network.
I use it to verify port forwarding and firewall rules are properly configured on the router, pfSense supports a "pure NAT" mode which takes the outbound connections to the router WAN IP and routes it back through the WAN firewall and NAT.
 

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^^^^
I also use pfSense, but my IPv4 host names are not externally available. I use port forwarding to a specific computer from my single IPv4 address. On IPv6, my host names are externally available, so that I can reach my computers from outside. My local DNS has the various devices listed for both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. On IPv6, however, I don't use the global addresses on IPv6, but rather the unique local addresses. IPv6 unique local addresses are similar to IPv4 RFC 1918 addresses, in that they are routable, but not over the Internet. NAT is not normally used on IPv6. So, my devices have both global and unique local (in fact 8 of each) on the interface, as well as link local, for a total of 15. of the global and unique local address are "privacy" addresses, based on random numbers. There's a new one every day, with those over 7 days old disappearing.

I test my firewall by connecting a computer to my cable modem. I then get a 2nd public IPv4 address from Rogers, which is outside of my firewall.
 

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^^^^
I also use pfSense, but my IPv4 host names are not externally available. I use port forwarding to a specific computer from my single IPv4 address. On IPv6, my host names are externally available, so that I can reach my computers from outside. My local DNS has the various devices listed for both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. On IPv6, however, I don't use the global addresses on IPv6, but rather the unique local addresses. IPv6 unique local addresses are similar to IPv4 RFC 1918 addresses, in that they are routable, but not over the Internet. NAT is not normally used on IPv6. So, my devices have both global and unique local (in fact 8 of each) on the interface, as well as link local, for a total of 15. of the global and unique local address are "privacy" addresses, based on random numbers. There's a new one every day, with those over 7 days old disappearing.

I test my firewall by connecting a computer to my cable modem. I then get a 2nd public IPv4 address from Rogers, which is outside of my firewall.
I'm with FibreOP so I don't have any public IPv6 addresses, until then I'm going to stick with IPv4 only. I played around with a hurricane electric tunnel but it screwed up Netflix and other geo-location based services that actually work over IPv6. Also FibreOP will only lease one public IPv4 off the ONT and using Advanced DMZ only supports one MAC.
 

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I am trying to setup a personal Ark Survivor Cluster and I cannot connect to my cluster inside my LAN. But people can connect through the cluster through the WAN side just not LAN because the Lack of NAT Loopback.
Hello Entropy did you find a way to fix the nat loopback
I have a ark server too and i have the same problem, i can't connect to it with the wan ip
well the onyly way if to use a VPN to connect to my server in the same lan.
 
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