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Thanks for posting this. I did try Chrome when it first came out and it did not impress me that much. However, after reading the above post, I downloaded and installed Chrome (rather than have it install online, which I am not keen on) and I was impressed this time around. Time will tell if the impression lasts, but for now it is my #2 after Internet Explorer. :cool:

James M. Fisher
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Interesting... I've noticed absolutely nothing different between the Beta and non-Beta. Guess I was expecting more features (ie. integration of Google Bookmarks, for example) as performance was decent from the get-go for me.
 

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I downloaded for the first time today. I use opera and firefox but Opera has been crashing on me so I think I will switch to firefox and chrome
 

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The one feature I like most about FF and Chrome is the search of the bookmarks folder in the address bar. I wish IE had this, and by the looks of things, IE8 will be lacking this feature too. It's so much easier to type part of a bookmark/favorite's name and have search find it than it is to browse through all my favorites.

James M. Fisher
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My computer monitor is my bigscreen tv. Without Pagezoom, like in IE, Opera and now even Firefox 3, Chrome is of no use to me.
 

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Without Pagezoom, like in IE, Opera and now even Firefox 3, Chrome is of no use to me.
You can ZOOM text, if that's what you need for readability on your TV - go to the Page Icon and Select 'Text Zoom', or use Ctl++, Ctl+-. or in most cases it's mapped to the scroll wheel of the mouse. I don't see a way to zoom the whole page, including graphics. I'm sold on the speed - this is my default browser now.
 

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The one feature I like most about FF and Chrome is the search of the bookmarks folder in the address bar. I wish IE had this, and by the looks of things, IE8 will be lacking this feature too. It's so much easier to type part of a bookmark/favorite's name and have search find it than it is to browse through all my favorites.

James M. Fisher
MS-MVP Windows Desktop Experience
One feature that I like about Chrome is you can just search the site when you type that site address and press Tab button. And i liked it because it is fast, and its gui is simple. But I saw slowing down in flash-powered site on low-performance computer.
 

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Chrome isn't great on older computers with minimal RAM (like the P3 w/256MB I'm typing this message on) because each tab is essentially a separate instance of the program, which means there's more memory overhead compared to other browsers. That might explain the reason why you saw slower performance on an older machine.
 

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Actually, I've noticed a problem with the Flash plug-in. I quite often see it taking 15 - 30% of CPU (usually playing ads on Digital Home). You can see all the processes by pressing Shift-Esc and kill the plug-in if you choose.

Meanwhile IE 6 displays Flash with zero extra CPU usage.

That is my only serious gripe with Chrome - I use it almost all the time.
 

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Without Pagezoom, like in IE, Opera and now even Firefox 3, Chrome is of no use to me.
Zooming all the page elements (not just text) is one of the latest enhancements. Taken from this CNET article. They are also preparing MAC and Linux versions.

Major new features

Version 2.0.156.1 includes many new features besides Greasemonkey support. Among them:

• Autocomplete, so Chrome can remember what you've typed into Web forms and enter them again. "A lot of people asked for that. It turns out it's more complicated than it seems on the surface," Rakowski said.

• Full-page zoom, so that using Ctrl+ and Ctrl- to increase or decrease elements on a Web page works better. Before, only text grew or shrank, but now other elements do, too.

• Browser profiles, so you can set up a browser configuration with particular settings such as bookmarks and cookies.

• The ability to import bookmarks from the Google Bookmarks site.

• Autoscroll, so clicking a mouse's middle button, then moving the mouse, lets you slide around larger pages. This is handy for panning around large images without constantly zooming in and out.

• Faster Safe Browsing, a feature to issue warnings about sites that may conduct phishing attacks or other malicious behavior.

• Under the hood, the update gets a new version of the open-source WebKit engine for converting a Web page's descriptive HTML and CSS code into the page displayed on a computer. Chrome's current stable release uses the same WebKit version as is used in Apple's Safari 3.1, but the new Chrome developer preview uses WebKit 528.8, which is faster and supports features such as CSS canvas drawing for 2D shapes such as lines on maps or custom-generated charts.

• An update of Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine from version 0.3.9.3 to 0.4.6.0. JavaScript is used for more elaborate Web pages, and the new version is faster, Rakowski said.

Missing from the new version is support for automatic discovery of Web site subscriptions through RSS and Atom "feed" technology. Google has mapped out feed support; the company plans to add it in the version 2 time frame, Rakowski said.
 

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If you check that article I referenced, you'll see that there are three 'channels' of Chrome available: stable, beta, and developer preview. The newer versions and features will take a little while to get into the stable release.
 
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