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Today, as part of our efforts to make the web faster, we are announcing Google Public DNS, a new experimental public DNS resolver.

The DNS protocol is an important part of the web's infrastructure, serving as the Internet's "phone book". Every time you visit a website, your computer performs a DNS lookup. Complex pages often require multiple DNS lookups before they complete loading. As a result, the average Internet user performs hundreds of DNS lookups each day, that collectively can slow down his or her browsing experience.

We believe that a faster DNS infrastructure could significantly improve the browsing experience for all web users. To enhance DNS speed but to also improve security and validity of results, Google Public DNS is trying a few different approaches that we are sharing with the broader web community through our documentation:

Speed: Resolver-side cache misses are one of the primary contributors to sluggish DNS responses. Clever caching techniques can help increase the speed of these responses. Google Public DNS implements prefetching: before the TTL on a record expires, we refresh the record continuously, asychronously and independently of user requests for a large number of popular domains. This allows Google Public DNS to serve many DNS requests in the round trip time it takes a packet to travel to our servers and back.

Security: DNS is vulnerable to spoofing attacks that can poison the cache of a nameserver and can route all its users to a malicious website. Until new protocols like DNSSEC get widely adopted, resolvers need to take additional measures to keep their caches secure. Google Public DNS makes it more difficult for attackers to spoof valid responses by randomizing the case of query names and including additional data in its DNS messages.

Validity: Google Public DNS complies with the DNS standards and gives the user the exact response his or her computer expects without performing any blocking, filtering, or redirection that may hamper a user's browsing experience.

We hope that you will help us test these improvements by using the Google Public DNS service today, from wherever you are in the world. We plan to share what we learn from this experimental rollout of Google Public DNS with the broader web community and other DNS providers, to improve the browsing experience for Internet users globally.

To get more information on Google Public DNS you can visit our site, read our documentation, and our logging policies. We also look forward to receiving your feedback in our discussion group.

By Prem Ramaswami, Public DNS Team
From the Google Code Blog Today
 

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The Google Public DNS IP addresses are as follows:

8.8.8.8
8.8.4.4

You can use either number as your primary or secondary DNS server. You can specify both numbers, but do not specify one number as both primary and secondary
 

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I changed over and highly recommend everyone does.

My experience is most ISP's are lousy at this and hijack any failed domain lookups.
 

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I trust Google far more than I do Rogers et al. Rogers hijacked my failed DNS lookups and uses DPI. Rogers also had numerous DNS problems over the year.

I moved from Rogers over this issue and am now with Primus. Primus recently started doing the same crap. I opted out.

Frankly, I am finding between using this and the Chrome browser, my web surfing experience is awesome!
 

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Ya, I can see where this is going. There is absolutely no reason for Google to run such a service unless they plan to eventually cash in on it.

-Mike
 

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Hmm...

I just did a traceroute to Bell's DNS and I get there in about 6ms. The two Google IPs are between 30ms and 35ms. I don't see how Google could make my browsing faster if every lookup takes 5 times longer (and some webpages have a lot of resolving to do). Unless of course there is some load issues on Bell's servers which doesn't seem to be the case for me in Ottawa anyway...

Bell also hijacks failed lookups but personally that doesn't bother me.

I think I'll pass on this one...
 

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I use OpenDNS. Part of what I like about it is extra security provided by blocks and warnings against possible malware sites. The security blocks are beneficial and can be bypassed so it's not exactly hijacking. Comodo (of Comodo Internet Security) offers a similar service.

I don't see Google saying anything about security. You can bet all those DNS lookups will go into a database and be mined as well.
 

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Awesome. I'm going to try this out. Rogers DNS is horrible and sometimes it feels like I'm surfing on dial up.

I used to use OpenDNS, but then they became the 'nanny of the Internet' and starting blocking and flagging sites. I'll pass. I want a fast DNS lookup not some company filtering the Internet for me.
 

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I think its wonderful that we have choice. I have used OPENDNS in the past when Rogers started hijacking failed DNS lookups but was not satisfied with the performance.

For those that are content with having failed DNS hijacked and sub-par performance (from some ISP's) then stick with what you have.

Validity: Google Public DNS complies with the DNS standards and gives the user the exact response his or her computer expects without performing any blocking, filtering, or redirection that may hamper a user's browsing experience.
That is my reason for switching!
 

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It takes seconds to change your dns settings guys so if you skeptical just try it and see for your self instead of jumping to conclusions. I personally tried it and tested a few sites and it gives me faster browsing on certain sites.
I am much the same as Hugh trust Google way more than my local isp, and really if all I have to do is redirect my dns using their faster more reliable service for FREE why would I care if they end up making money off of it and ultimately make my web life more personalized and enriched.
Its forward thinkers like Google that have been and will continue to shape our future,(hopefully for the better)
 

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Other good free DNS addresses are 4.2.2.1, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.2.2.4, 4.2.2.5, 4.2.2.6. These are a network of DNS servers operated by a company called Level 3 Communications. Since they are distributed and configured to use the closest server, they are fast and reliable.

Here is a list of public DNS servers. Enjoy. ;)

BTW, tracert to Google servers is slow from my system. Teksavvy was the fastest and they are net neutrality advocates and, AFAIK, they don't do hijacks. Teksavvy subscribers likely want to stick with the default. Level 3 and OpenDNS both had reasonable tracert times. Level3 and Google both had the largest number of hops.

I just set up my router to use Teksavvy (my ISP), OpenDNS and Level 3 as the static DNS servers (in that order.) Sorry Google. ;)
 

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Screws up CDN Routing...

One thing that many might not realize is that most Content Distribution Networks (you know, Akamai and company) rely on DNS resolution to send you to the closest content node...

Watch what happens when I use the Bell DNS in Ottawa vs. Google's DNS to resolve a popular website like www.cbc.ca:

Code:
# dig @[B]67.69.235.1[/B] +short www.cbc.ca --> This is Bell's Ottawa DNS
www.cbc.ca.edgesuite.net.
a1849.gc.akamai.net.
[B]67.69.247.8
67.69.247.25[/B]

# dig @[B]8.8.8.8[/B] +short www.cbc.ca --> This is Google's DNS
www.cbc.ca.edgesuite.net.
a1849.gc.akamai.net.
[B]72.246.43.97
72.246.43.10[/B]

# ping -c 10 -q 67.69.247.8
PING 67.69.247.8 (67.69.247.8): 56 data bytes

--- 67.69.247.8 ping statistics ---
10 packets transmitted, 10 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 5.704/[B]6.112[/B]/6.733/0.262 ms

# ping -c 10 -q 72.246.43.97
PING 72.246.43.97 (72.246.43.97): 56 data bytes

--- 72.246.43.97 ping statistics ---
10 packets transmitted, 10 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 22.340/[B]22.790[/B]/23.043/0.248 ms
The latency to reach the server with the cbc.ca content when using the Google DNS is almost 4 times as much!

So not only does Google take 5x more time to resolve addresses it also sends you to the wrong server when fetching content that is hosted by CDN's like Akamai (and they carry 20% of the web BTW...).

Food for thought... :)
 

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I'm quite happy with opendns in the six months I've had it, maybe two redirects, no interference /blocking ,and the performace is more than adequate (you guys DO remember 300 baud modems ,yes?)

Having said that I AM taking notes on the alternatives.........
 
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