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Discussion Starter #1
Starting a new thread, might get to the bottom of this, and help others?

James, need some help if you see this. I have bought a couple of Foscam ip cameras for security, connected them directly to my Bell Turbo Hub ethernet ports (Netgear mvbr1210c), and of course I can't access them remotely.

I have the gogo6 home access client running on my Win7 laptop with "routing advertisements" enabled. I have gone into the "home access" section of the client and setup my webcam, given it a name, and the static ip address. The client says there's success, and the camera should be accessible from:

cam.(myusername).broker.freenet6.net

but it's not. I'm trying to access the camera from my cell phone,using it's data service, with the gogo6 client running as guest on the phone. I do have ipv6 access, verified by going to test-ipv6.com which says I have a ipv6 address, although my browser is avoiding using it? My phone isp is Telus. I have also tried accessing the cameras through the many ip cam viewers available for android, none of them connect either.

I can ping (myusername).broker.freenet6.net without issue from my phone, but I cannot get access to the ip cameras. The cameras setup firewall rules when installed. I have checked if the port I assigned is open, and it is, it shows red at http://ipv6.chappell-family.com/ipv6tcptest/ when I run a port scan test.

Glen
 

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Discussion Starter #2
This exercise is moot, I can't forward ports on my Bell internet service, cellular Turbo Hub. No matter what I try they remain blocked, stealth, thus the cameras are useless, other than local monitoring....great. I'm feed up with our ISP's in Canada, pathetic.

Glen
 

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Very common

This is common across all the cellular internet access, they routinely block whatever they feel isn't "normal" internet access, and there's no way to even complain about it.

The mechanism is pretty simple: they often don't even give you a public IP, everything is through a NAT, really restricting how useful it can be.

It's not only our cellular ISPs, in the US my TMobile connection is forced through a proxy that automatically recompresses all images to a lower res, makes looking at any pictures on my phone completely useless. They claim it's to save me from hitting my bandwidth allowance, which is all well and good and believable if they gave me the option of turning it off. They don't. So clearly it's not about protecting me, but protecting them.
 

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I've seen several friends of mine who have security cameras on their homes (in Canada) and can monitor those cameras on their phones when travelling. (Halifax house, when visiting Toronto) So I believe there must be a way, even with Canadian ISPs ;) , since my friends use Canadian ISPs. I don't know the intricacies though.

Please try to assist the OP rather than complaining about ISPs. Thanks. I assume that's what's being discussed here? If not, my apologies.
 

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I've seen several friends of mine who have security cameras on their homes (in Canada) and can monitor those cameras on their phones when travelling. (Halifax house, when visiting Toronto) So I believe there must be a way, even with Canadian ISPs ;) , since my friends use Canadian ISPs. I don't know the intricacies though.

Please try to assist the OP rather than complaining about ISPs. Thanks. I assume that's what's being discussed here? If not, my apologies.
FWIW the op is trying to port forward an internet connection supplied by a rocket hub. This is a cellular connection, and comes with all the blocks that I spoke of.

My point @57: there is no solution to offer, other then kludges like having scripts automatically updating an image to a "normal" server, which is likely not what the OP is looking for.

As for your statement about "not complaining about ISPs", maybe I'm in the minority here, but I think it's a good idea to complain on public forums. It brings to light the issues in the industry, how the OP, trying to do something which is pretty basic these days, is blocked from doing so because of ancient reasons that are no longer applicable and hold users like this back.

I don't see why hiding these issues is a good idea.
 

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Nothing wrong with complaining, although we typically have threads specifically for that. The OP was probably looking for some assistance, even if it's a workaround, or a specific reason for his problem (like post 5), not a general complaint about ISPs. Hence my general comment, not aimed specifically at you, since post 2 was similar in nature.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi guys...

There are options, like Teamviewer, but the point is we shouldn't have to go through all this. We pay way too much for "poor" service as it is already, now I find out I can't even "see" my webcams hooked directly to my router. So it means leaving a computer on all the time with Teamviewer running just to access a security cam. Am I complaining about my ISP, you bet, it's ridiculous, $70 a month for 10gb of data is a joke, but living in a rural area you have no choice.

Glen
 

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I feel your pain.

Some of my bills with Rogers when using the Rocket Hub were 120 to 150 per month at my cabin when we weren't even living there full time. Can't tell you how happy I am to be paying "only" 70.00 per month now for a WISP.

To bring this back to the IP camera question for anyone else who might read this...

With the iPv6 tunnelling you are using to get into your remote network, you will also have to create tunnel(s) through the cellular hub to the camera(s) or any other device(s) on the remote network. This should be possible using essentially the same procedures you used to get access to the systems and services you have already set up, but you will need IP network camera's that support IPv6.

In my Rogers installation I connected remotely to my Panasonic IP camera on my cabin network for two years. I was able to do this because the extra 10 dollars a month I paid Rogers for a public IP address gave me a VPN - a tunnel - through their cellular cloud from the public internet directly to my cellular hub. This allowed me to port forward on the hub to the devices on my remote network, including my camera.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bell will not give me a public ip address, at any extra cost, I've asked nicely twice. They say there for business customers only.

With the gogo6 client there are options to setup home devices such as cameras, it's called "home access", no matter what I try I can't see the cameras. I guess it's because the foscam cameras don't support ipv6, as was pointed out earlier. If I had known it was going to be an issue I would have never both them, just figured a camera, was a camera.

Glen
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Revive my old thread with a new question. Still trying options to view ip cameras from remote locations, still will not work with the Bell Turbo Hub.

My question is. If I buy a Dlink ip camera, I can view that camera remotely, a camera that is connected to my Turbo Hub. How is it that I can see that camera connected to my home network using the Dlink program on my Android phone, but I can't setup any other ip camera to do the same thing. What is it that the Dlink camera is doing, that I can't do with a webcam or Foscam camera. How is Dlink getting around my blocked ports, that cannot be opened (by me), no how.

I'm not well versed in all this, please tell me how I'm able to see the Dlink camera on my phone, but not another camera I have here connected directly to my Turbo Hub router.

Thanks

Glen
 

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Any chance you're using port forwarding to get past NAT? If so, you're limited to only one, unless you can use different port numbers. If you were running IPv6, that wouldn't be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi James, I cant get out at all with anything on my "home network". I think we established earlier in the thread that I was "double nated" if that's a word. I have a Bell Turbo Hub, works off the Cellular network, and is locked down as far a I know. I've never been able to see anything on my home network from the outside, unless I use something like Teamviewer.

I still don't understand how these Dlink cloud cameras work. It's connected to my home network, and I can access it from the outside using their program on my Android phone. I guess it's doing the same as Teamviewer.

I just want some way to directly view my cameras remotely, like I can with a Dlink camera, but for the last number of years I've got no where with it. I can forward ports all day long, their invisible to the outside world.

Glen
 

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Are you saying that a D-link cloud camera on the same home network connected to the Internet by a Bell Turbo Hub is viewable externally under the same conditions where the Foscam isn't?

If so, the D-link software on the camera is establishing a tunnel for you in concert with the mydlink software on your Android phone.

It may be helpful to be more specific on the details.

For example - "I can view my D-link model (abc) cloud camera connected directly to my Bell Turbo Hub model (manufacturer) by ethernet cable when I am on the (Rogers/Bellus) network in (some city) remotely from my Android (some manufacturer) phone using the D-link (whatever) application version (123). To do this I login to an account I created on website (my D-link something or other) when I installed the camera."
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Yes, that's what I'm saying.

I'm able to view the Dlink remotely, yes, using their software. And no, I've never been able to view these Foscam cameras remotely (any ip camera I have, other than the Dlink), regardless of what software I've used.

That's what I don't understand, how Dlink is able to "get around" whatever it is Bell does to block things from my end.

I honestly don't know how to describe or state the situation any better, you cannot see anything on my network from the outside, yet the Dlink camera works (with their software), as does Teamviewer.

If I can see the camera through those versions of software, why can't I do so myself. Again, no network expert here. Have no trouble at my end, all computers, Windows, Linux, Raspberry Pi, work and play nice together, just need a way to see ip cameras remotely, which so far has proven impossible.

Reading back through this thread should give all the necessary "details".

"If so, the D-link software on the camera is establishing a tunnel for you in concert with the mydlink software on your Android phone."

That's what I would like to achieve, yet absolutely nothing has worked. For the last couple of years I've tried every tutorial possible to access ip cameras, and none of them work. My network is not visible to the outside world, but, I'll say once again, Dlink is doing it (making it posible for me to see their camera remotely), so is Teamviewer. What I don't understand, is how Dlink are able to give me access to their camera, attached to my network, and I can't (nobody can) access a ip camera on my network. Hope that clears things up?

If they can "tunnel" into my network, why can't I "tunnel" out.:)

Glen
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Actually, the Dlink is going back tomorrow for a refund. The night vision on the Foscams is far superior. Is the "tunnel" not something "I" can do?

Glen
 

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If you're still married to the Bell Turbo Hub and cellular data service, and they still won't give you a public IP address, your options haven't really changed over the last 12-18 months.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Ya, my backs against a wall. Rural residents of Canada (Ontario) have little to no choice. It's a Turbo hub, dial up, or satellite. It's $70 a month for a 10gb cap, locked down so tight you can't do anything, all pretty pathetic, but there's no alternative.

Glen
 
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