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Greetings HT aficionados,

i can hear you thinking "Oh, no, not another insulation question"

before you get bored, i would like to say that I have searched extensively this forum, and other forums for insulating basement floors

i know about dricore, delta-fl, etc

but i still wanted to bounce an idea off you. i heard someone recently questioning this whole idea, that there should be something with "dimples" on the floor so that if there is any water/moisture, first it won't damage the floor, and second it will dry off and it won't contribute to mold, etc.

here is the question. What is that force that will help evaporate the moisture/water? Air? In order for air to dry off something wet, it has to move. What will make the air move? Basements are the lowest point in a house and there are no drafts there. I might be wrong, anyone?

so, here is my idea. OSB or plywood boards glued to the concrete floor and to each other, and then the laminate flooring on top. Glueing the boards to the concrete will definitely prevent the water/moisture to collect under.

why will this not work?

thanks very much for your time

mart
 

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Not an expert here...but wouldn't any moisture that comes up through the slab cause the 'wood' to heave?
Why wouldn't you at least use a ' moisture barrier'?

I ended up choosing Dri-core, as I got a smoking deal on it (price matched and a 'friends and family coupon' and it only took 1 day to install an entire skid of it.

I was considering Superseal (you can google) as the barrier and then using T&G plywood on top.

I wanted the r value over our slab and well I only used dricore prior to framing in our 'inhabited' rooms. I did not do my storage room or laundry room and built my interior walls on top of the dricore. So I suppose using your example I'd have more 'air-flow' as I have two edges of dricore exposed inside other other rooms.
 

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for what you would spend insulating the floor, spend it insulating the walls properly. I have just done my basement, sprayfoamed the walls and it is so warm I have to close some of the vents. I have nothing on the floor but 11mm underpad and a nice berber carpet and we lie on the floor and it is warm.

the only reason to go with dri core or something like that is if you have a trickle of water once in awhile.
 

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Another option if you are doing laminate/floating floor is to put styrofoam blue underneath. It gives a moisture barrier and insulation.
 

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my situation

Went through this 12 years ago when I was redoing the basement. At that time I was debating laminate flooring as a floating floor over the concrete slab or something else. Part of the basement had hardwood parquet flooring glued to the slab. I found that floor cold and hard... no give.

Delta FL allowed me to put down T&G plywood 5/8ths... This gave a great base for hardwood. In my case I went with parquet as I was trying to keep the difference between the two floors as slight as possible... another 7/16 ths.

The result a floor that feels like it is a regular floor on joists with. Everyone notices the difference between the two parquet installations.
 

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Can anyone tell if there is any difference between the Delta-FL and the Delta-MS? The Delta-MS is the dark red stuff used to wrap the outside of a foundation. The Delta-MS is a lot cheaper then the Delta-FL. It looks like it is the same stuff when comparing the two at the store.

Greg
 

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I have no water trickling in in the basement, and haven't had any for as long as I've owned the house (2.5 years).

However, I noticed some mold this summer (wet cold summer). I'm redoing my basement now and noticed that the tiles glued directly to the slab are the source of the moisture and mold. The areas of the basement with bare slab have no moisture and no mold. It's just the areas under the tiles that have trapped moisture. Note however, at the edge of the tiles was wood framing that had a plastic vapour barrier against the floor. I believe it has been acting as a moisture condensation surface, and has been wicking water to the tiled area.

Needless to say, I'm going with dri-core.
 

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I am almost complete finishing my basement floor I used superseal 1/8 thick stuff called all-in-one. It has worked great I have a 4year old house no moisture but wanted to prevent any possible mold problems. It has flat dimples which helps prevent the clicking from the superseal to the cement as apposed to rounded dimples that can cause this when the floor is uneven the best price was at Rona .54 cents a square.
 

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Barricade

I put Barricade subfloor down in my basement I think it is the same price as dricore at about $5.99 for each 2by 2 tile. Barricade differs from Dricore in that the bottom is 1/2" blue sm board so it works as a moisture barrier and insulation, the top is chipboard but the real bonus for me was that it is made in Canada and was purchased at a Canadian owned retailer.
 

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dricore and many of the 2X2 pannels are made with the theoryof allowing ventilation to allow drying. Delta and platon work from a different theory. They are isolating the area below the product from the living space. sealing all seams and gaps.

delta's/platon's theory is supportid by BS

buildingscience.com/documents/primers/plonearticlemultipage.2006-12-05.5229931729/section-2-recommendations/?searchterm=basement%20insulation
 

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Done both the Dri-core and Delta (with OSB) products and happy with each. Would though be hesitant to put either down if thought I'd be getting water on the slab.

To the OP believe the theory is air will flow along then up and through the gap left around the perimeter. Flow would be caused be temperature differential.
 

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Can anyone tell if there is any difference between the Delta-FL and the Delta-MS? The Delta-MS is the dark red stuff used to wrap the outside of a foundation. The Delta-MS is a lot cheaper then the Delta-FL. It looks like it is the same stuff when comparing the two at the store.

Greg
MS is typically used outside to wrap the concrete foundation of a new home and I believe it has a higher % of recycled content. My understanding was that it is indeed effectively the same thing, however there is a significant differance in the smell of the product. Stick your nose near the MS and it smells strong - not sure it would be something I would want in my basement...despite the price!

Eljaca.
 

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MS is typically used outside to wrap the concrete foundation of a new home and I believe it has a higher % of recycled content. My understanding was that it is indeed effectively the same thing, however there is a significant differance in the smell of the product. Stick your nose near the MS and it smells strong - not sure it would be something I would want in my basement...despite the price!

Eljaca.
Well I used the Delta-MS in my basement and there is no smell to it. The smell of the OSB is much stronger anyways. I've got unused rolls as well in the basement and there is no smell from them either.

Using this is much cheaper then anything else. The price for a roll of Delta-MS is $129.99 and the size of the roll is 780 sqft. OSB is $10.67 for a 5/8 sheet at 4x8, so I did the math and the price for a 2x2 square using these materials is $2.00 compared to Dri-core at $6.49 for a 2x2 square I think it is a no brainer what I used.

Greg
 
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