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Just posting some observations and tips in the event someone else finds them self in the same predicament.

I was troubleshooting some performance issues on my home-built WHS a few days ago. The problem turned about to be a dying HDD in the array, but despite being an awesome little O/S, native WHS doesn't do a great job in the diagnostics dept.

Shutting down RDC, connecting a monitor etc. and rebooting the machine was the first opportunity I had to spot a S.M.A.R.T. error on drive #2 during the boot sequence. During this time, there was no evidence of a problem in the RDC session and the WHS console reported "Healthy" on all four (2TB) drives.

Whilst playing the the BIOS bootup mode, it was a simple matter to disconnect SATA cables and isolate the device under distress. This was a good thing, because other than "physical drive #2", WHS wasn't much help there either.

The next challenge was that (if selective duplication is used) you can't simply physically remove a drive from the array and pray that the system will restore the missing mirrored data. You must follow the remove process that redistributes the data and then ejects the errant device from the storage pool.

This can also be a challenge if the remaining pool doesn't have room to take said data; you can turn off mirroring, or in my case, add another drive to the pool, redistribute the data, and then start the removal procedure.

The last problem was that even though I knew which physical HDD was bad, I didn't know which of the four "ST32000542AS" devices listed in the console was the errant drive. I must have missed/skipped the option to relabel the HDDs when they were loaded.

The good news is that I found the free Home Server SMART Add-In (http://www.dojonorthsoftware.net/Freebies/HomeServerSMART.aspx). This was able to identify S.M.A.R.T errors in the WHS console, but alas, it was not able to tell me which drive had to be removed from the console view.

Next up, I found a free trial version of Disk Management Add-In (http://www.tentaclesoftware.com/products/whs/diskmanagement) which WAS able to step through the drives, immediately identify the flawed drive AND mark it for removal. The full version is $10.

So in a nutshell, unless you're ascribing unique names, it may not be easy to match a failed physical drive to one listed in the WHS console view, but there are tools available to help.
 

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Nice post APN, thanks for the info. I'm certain it will help some folks down the road.
 

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I just wish there was an option to replace a failing system drive. this is what I have now and have to deal with the next few days.
I did some quick searches today and found older ideas as to how to go about it, I might just turn off mirroring do a full reinstall on a new bigger drive and then swap out my existing drives too at the same time.

I already had a failed pool drive and yes it is a nightmare if you have diy system with all the same model drives the first time you encounter it!
 
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