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Rogers receivers, for example, download and stream their movies and other VOD video. As with any download service, you are able to start watching your shows while the download is still occurring.

Regarding older receivers, just because old receivers aren't able to utilize the service does not invalidate the fact that VOD service is now available with the Dish network.

I think the issue people are having here is how to define Video On Demand. From what I have read, the definition is:
A service that allows subscribers to retrieve and watch a selection of movies (on video) at any time.

That would mean, if you choose a movie from Dish's VOD service, at 3am in the morning, the receiver retrieves it and allows the user to watch it when the consumer watches it. As well as the same movies being available at 3pm. Whether you call it a download service or something else, it doesn't make it any less of a Video On Demand service.
 

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ltldev, Its true that both services acheive a similar result for PVR owners BUT, as I noted earlier, not for the vast majority of ExpressVu users who don't have one.

Frankly I was responding to, what IMHO was, Falcon's rude comment to SensualPoet. (Did you read the linked thread before you posted?) I agree with SensualPoet.

I think Rogers solution is superior and more universal so calling the ExpressVu download would be more probably be a more acccurate description.
 

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I don't want to get into what is superior and what is not because I disagree and feel that's Rogers services and inferior in just about ever aspect (for another thread). I was/am simply saying that no matter the channel, path or technology type to obtain the VOD data, Dish's ability to deliver a movie etc by a click of a button is in fact a VOD service because the movie is delivered when the user demands it and is not sent until the user requests it.

If you don't agree, we will just have to agree to disagree.
 

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It is not a VOD service if it requires additional equipment like a PVR to access it. People with STBs cannot access this on BEV/Dish, so it's a download service, just like you download to a computer HDD.

Also, there is a delay associated with the process - the movie (a portion at least) has to be buffered to the HDD, while VOD doesn't have that delay. So, we'll also have to disagree.
 

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Every cable user has the ability to access VOD? I thought it was only users with a digital box? Why is that any different than a user who needs a PVR?

IMO they are both VOD. Just because they are stored on Rogers HDD is irrelevant to me.

Which one is better and can viewed by many is a different matter.
 

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Q, re-read my posts. Every digital cable user has access to VOD.
 

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There's a big difference in price between a STB (which is often free from Rogers - say with Digital VIP, or as a new subscriber after rebates) and many hundreds of $ for a PVR.

Also, many people have several (inexpensive or free) STBs on several TVs in their home, while BEV customers with STBs cannot access (I realize that the 9200 can be accessed from a couple of TVs)
 

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from wikipedia.

Video on demand (VOD) systems allow users to select and watch video and clip content over a network as part of an interactive television system. VOD systems either "stream" content, allowing viewing in real time, or "download" it in which the program is brought in its entirety to a set-top box before viewing starts. The latter is more appropriately termed "store and forward". The majority of cable and telco based VOD systems use the streaming approach, whereby a user buys or selects a movie or television program and it begins to play on the television set almost instantaneously.

Often, nowadays, the term encompasses a broader spectrum of delivery devices, referring not only to set-top-boxes but also computers, mobile phones and indeed any system that can receive on-demand audio-visual content over a network.


I will not argue that rogers currently is cheaper to receive and has a much larger base of its clients.

There is no reason in the future that all stb's have a preinstalled flash drive which will allow it to do VOD.
 

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It is not a VOD service if it requires additional equipment like a PVR to access it. People with STBs cannot access this on BEV/Dish, so it's a download service, just like you download to a computer HDD.

Also, there is a delay associated with the process - the movie (a portion at least) has to be buffered to the HDD, while VOD doesn't have that delay. So, we'll also have to disagree.
The use of extra technology has no barring on if VOD is available or not.
 

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OK, so the term has been expanded ([email protected]?) to encompass what is now available from other providers, still the Wiki site says:

...more appropriately termed "store and forward"
I think we've said enough on the topic and we all understand how both systems work and they are different. If you wish to use the same term for both, that is obviously your prerogative, however inaccurate.

For example, the BEV/Dish system could be called store and forward, or download, however, the ROD (Rogers on Demand) cannot be called either, so obviously they are different.
 

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I agree, enough is said about this topic.

Cable is not the same as Satellite and their VOD services don't have to be either. But they can both offer their own version of VOD and still be called VOD.
 

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57,

the term was from this statement.

....or "download" it in which the program is brought in its entirety to a set-top box before viewing starts.

This is not the way VOD would work with Dish or Bell therefore I would not call it a store and forward concept either.

I do find it interesting how ROD users feel this would not class this as a VOD service.
 

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The way we (Rogers customers) and Rogers themselves would define OD is something that can be accessed by any digital (cable) customer. There are also quite a number of OD channels with thousands of programmes available. Since roughly 60% of Rogers customers are now digital, OD is available to a huge number of customers, with a huge variety of programming.

On BEV, I don't know what percentage would have PVRs, but I suspect it's not nearly as high a percentage, nor is the variety of programming available, nor is the programme available instantaneously.

These are significant differences. We would not qualify Torrents as an "on-demand" service, yet by your definition, it is...

Some of this is semantics, but the technology is quite different and the equipment required to access the programming is also different, hence our wish to clarify the matter.

We're not saying its wrong to use the term OD, but it is inaccurate, in the same way it would be inaccurate to call a Rogers STB a PVR simply because it can access an OD service (essentially the reverse of what you've been saying).
 

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57,

VOD is a term used to get video when you want it through a company's receiver. Nothing to do with torrents.

Just because Rogers streams it on the same cable instead of downloading a portion of it should not change the term.

The amount of users and the equipment is irrelevant.

Calling a Rogers stb a PVR which has acces to VOD would be innacurate because it can't record.

I do agree the tech. is completely different and I would say the Rogers method is far better. I don't think satellite VOD can be any better because of it limitations of bandwidth and one way communication.
 

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the equipment is irrelevant.
It is relevant. You say it has nothing to do with torrents, but what BEV/Dish is doing is like Torrents, in that you need a special piece of equipment with a HDD to download the programme. This is not necessary with ROD, only a STB is required, hence the distinction.

People who use a computer to download a programme and then view it on their TVs would never call that "on demand", yet you wish us to accept that term for the exact same thing on BEV/Dish.

I will not accept it. It's inaccurate.
 

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To a regular cable user a digital box may be considered "special piece of equipment "

I don't understand why equipment has anything to do with the term VOD.

If you don't have the equipment you don't get VOD. It does not mean it is not VOD?

If a company existed which provided programming through the internet with its own hdd and there service had VOD through the same line as the programming which is a plug into the internet would that be what you call VOD?
 

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If a company existed which provided programming through the internet with its own hdd and there (sic) service had VOD through the same line as the programming which is a plug into the internet would that be what you call VOD?
Yes, unlike what BEV/Dish provide, which is store and forward, or download.

It's the "same difference" as downloading a song or listening to it streamed. (A cellphone user without any storage to speak of, could listen to a streamed song, while a more elaborate setup would be required to download for example, hence the difference is apparent again.)

As you can see, one is called downloading, one is called streamed. Confusion would result if you called downloading streaming, hence the reason we are dwelling on what some would call semantics, but what I call accuracy.
 

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Cable is not the same as Satellite and their VOD services don't have to be either. But they can both offer their own version of VOD and still be called VOD.
They certainly can call them VOD, however, by calling everything VOD, the term loses its usefulness. The analogy is Full HD. By calling ExpressVu's offering Full HD, the idea that FULL HD means 1080p has been lost.

I personally think that by calling downloads VOD, the term has lost its usefulness.

Another analogy would be streaming vs. downloading. Both involve data being sent to a computer but making the distinction is important.

(edit: posted before I saw 57's response so some duplication!)
 

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I fail to see why partially downloaded data and pure streaming would change the fact that at a particular moment in time you wanted to watch something and both methods allow you to watch it right away. To me......that is VOD.
 

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How much time does it take for the programme to start after you request it?

How much equipment (how expensive or elaborate) is required for the process to work?

These items are what distinguish one from the other. One would not call a bicycle a car, even though they are both used as transportation.
 
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