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I have to ask....

What prevents your neighbour from accessing your network? Considering the entire cable plant on my street (and most streets) is simply connected by a series of two-way splitters, what prevents my neighbors from being able to access my network? I assume there must be some sort of security similar to WEP or WPA encryption on WiFi connections, but by connecting to the coax in your house you're beaming your signal straight into all the other houses connected to your cable plant in your area. Unless you disconnect the incoming coax to your house but, of course, you can only do that if you don't have cable TV/internet/home phone.
 

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When you look at the sample photos, these is a manual switch to toggle between cable and network...

To me, that's an extreme inconvenience and I probably won't use it even if it were given to me...let alone the prohibited price.
 

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Very, very good point raised regarding security over the coax. I can't see how they would have released such a product without taking that into account. But you never know! :D
 

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I don't see the article mentions any kind of line or data rates being achieved with this device. Which is unfortunate, given one of its major selling points is to replace Wi-Fi because Wi-Fi is too slow for HD streaming.

Anyone has info on this ?
 

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Plus ca change and all that. Ethernet over coax was the thing in 1990 before 10BaseT was invented. For home use, especially injected onto an Analog coax circuit it seems like a good idea.


Speed wise it will certainly get 10Mbs and probably a lot more
 

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I'll jump on if it drops to the the $100-$120/kit ($50-$60 per adapter) price.

I don't really care about security as I would be more than happy to disconnect the coax lines I'd use.

What I want is whole-house ethernet so I can send my PVR signal to extenders in various rooms. Wi-fi just doesn't cut it for media in my area, but the house is already pre-wired with coax in most rooms, so this would be perfect
 

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I don't see the article mentions any kind of line or data rates being achieved with this device.
MoCA alliance says 175 Mbps actual throughput (not theoretical)
I suspect for this to work, the cable in question will have to be disconnected from the cable tv network, and used soley to connect the ethernet from router to computer
You are wrong. It operates above 850 MHZ so there is no interference with cable. The whole point of the technology is to deliver data though coax without interfering with cable.
 

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MoCA is not a brand new technology but it is new as a consumer add-on item.

For example, the FiOS fiber-to-the-home offering from Verizon in the US uses the MoCA standard to distribute it's TV signals throughout the home.
 

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It looks to me like it's a coax in, and a TV / Ethernet out. Not either / or but both.

It seems like a great idea... but the price is too high. I got the D-Link Ethernet over power for $150 and it does up to 200 mbps.

That works great for me. The only issue is that I can't plug it into a power bar so it takes up an electrical socket.

Now... if this were $150? I'd consider it if my Ethernet over power failed.
 

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We're having too many problems with our Wireless-G network in the kid's rooms so I will eventually move them to either a HomePlug or MoCA network. Not sure which I'll go with just yet, but it seems like HomePlug can be more finicky, so that might tip the scales to MoCA as I just don't want any more hassles. But I'm still keeping my options open.
 

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Ethernet over the power grid is a pretty solid solution,, it uses a fairly low frequency on the power grid that isint used or distrubed by the power. Its a pretty good solution considering your not limited by where coax might be installed, here you just need a power outlet which you will for sure have since your pc has to be plugged somewheres. Company I work for is one of few that certifies this type of product in Canada.
 

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Motorola released a similar device called a NIM-100. I am using this to get my network to my bedroom where it is hard to run CAT-5. This device is working fine for streaming HD video which is hard to do with wifi. When I attach a PC I get (according to task manager) sustained connections of 45 Mbps.

You can often find these adapters on eBay - I bought mine for US$90 for three of the adapters.
 

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1) The Motorola NIM100 is MoCA, but I don't think it has any user-settable encryption. Correct me if I'm wrong. If I'm right then in the rare case your neighbour got the same unit off eBay, he may be able to hop onto your network. The new Netgear version is for residential use, and the encryption key can be changed. (This is similar to powerline adapters. With a software utility, you can change the encryption.) With the Motorola NIM100, I've seen reports north of 90 Mbps. $30 each is very cheap though. I've been seeing them for $40-50 US each.

2) With the NIM100, you can watch cable and HD cable, as well as continue to use your PVR. The same is true for the Netgear.

3) There is no powerline adapter in existence that can get 200 Mbps real-world. That is the max theoretical but most people are well south of 100 Mbps. I am using the "200 Mbps" Netgear HDX101 which isn't HomePlug AV compliant. However, the HomePlug AV compliant standard is the same speed and sometimes slightly slower in benchmarks.

3) Powerline adapter placement is crucial, esp. in large and/or old homes. On some circuits I'd get speeds several times higher than other electrical circuits. It pays to try multiple plugs, esp. if you have more than one circuit to the room.

3) My Netgear HDX101 powerline adapters were giving me 39 Mbps in the same room on the same electrical circuit, and 30 Mbps across the house on certain specific plugs. I then had some electrical work done (AC, baseboard heater, etc.) and suddenly my speeds dropped dramatically to below 10 Mbps, and sometimes well below that. It was perfectly fine for internet access but not good for media streaming. Some of my electrical circuits had been doubled up on single breakers, so I had them split into 2-pole thin breakers to be independent, but my speeds remained poor.

6) I finally decided to run CAT5e. Now I get 900 Mbps. :) I use the powerline adapters in the rest of house where I only need internet access and not high bandwidth.

7) I have wireless throughout the house. 3 access points (and an extra one for the garden in the summer). However, they are all running off the wired network. Otherwise, wireless speed can be too unreliable IMO, if the computer is at any significant distance from the access point. With a wired network (and by wired I'm including that powerline network), one can add multiple wireless access points for full-strength wireless with no dead spots anywhere.
 
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