Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 20 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone here taken the big step of cutting the landline cord, and going wireless only. I'm contemplating going this route very soon.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,434 Posts
A significant percentage of the population, especially younger people, do not have a landline: Here's a sample study from a few years ago, so the numbers have only grown since then.

The Daily*—*Residential Telephone Service Survey,*2013

Exclusive cell phone use is more pronounced in young households where all of the members are under 35 years of age. In 2013, 60% of these households reported using a cell phone exclusively
Many of my friends and relatives are now cellphone exclusive and I'm over 60. There are a couple of important reasons that we have not yet dropped the landline, but they are unique to our specific situation. Those reasons will likely disappear in a couple of years. We are not "cell phone addicted" and have a 6+ year old dumb PAYGo phone for emergency use only.

If we did use a smartphone for most calls, we would have dropped the landline years ago when we left ma Bell.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,217 Posts
My wife and I are contemplating cutting the cord, but first we need to figure out:
1. Which company to go with for a decent cellphone package. We're currently on $10/mo. "pay as you go" (PAYG) with Telus. We'd like a good all-around package with some data as well as inexpensive minutes and texting fees, but we don't want to pay a lot per month, either.

2. Which company to go with for cable Internet. We currently have ADSL with TekSavvy and we don't want to pay a dry-loop fee after we've cut the cord. TekSavvy would be the logical and less-costly choice, but I've read that Rogers is possibly better for service (while other companies can be at the mercy of Rogers when it comes to servicing their customers).

3. Whether or not to go with an Internet-based home phone service. Not sure if it's necessary, although it would allow us to continue with out PAYG cellphone service.

4. Whether to drop our existing Rogers basic TV service and go with an Internet-based TV service (or maybe even just OTA). Are they proven services? Does Rogers offer something similar (or will it in the near future)?

There's a lot to think about before taking the cord-cutting step...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,434 Posts
Just to clarify, this discussion is about eliminating a landline, not "cutting the cord" as it has been discussed in other threads. I will change the title. I do realize that eliminating the landline may also impact other decisions regarding the "whole cord".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I was one of the last of my friends to have a traditional, "POTS" landline; they thought I was a little nuts, but I really don't like cellphones. (I have a pay-as-you-go phone with 7-11 Speakout Wireless; it's basically a texting device, and I'll occasionally make a call.)

With some trepidation, I moved my landline over from Bell to a TekSavvy VOIP line back in late October (my cable internet is also with TS). There was a blip in TekSavvy's service a couple of weeks ago, affecting my internet and landline -- so, when my internet was on, I popped-off an email to my family -- about the only people who ever call me on my LL -- to reach me on my cell if it was an emergency. Things got straghtened-around in a day or so.

For ten bucks a month (as opposed to $33 with Bell), I can say I'm satisfied with the VOIP service so far, after being a loyal POTS customer with Bell for years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Somehow, I'm paying $54/month for my landline with 3 features that never gets used and the only calls I get are from telemarketers, and its' annoying as hell. My wife and I are always reachable on our wireless cell phones. I just don't see a purpose for a landline anymore. Once during an extended power outage, only the cell phones worked, and those can always be charged in the car if necessary. I just wonder how many of the over 50 crowd like me, are contemplating dumping the landline. I also have VOIP for $3/month just to make U.S. calls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
I cut POTS in 2007 and never regretted it although cellphone calls leave much to be desired as far as sound quality goes. Now since my "exchanges" with the Quebec government often require fax send and receive, I maintain a MagicJack account for a desk phone and the fax machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts
If you currently have a landline that you're paying too much for, I'd recommend getting VoIP first. My ATA cost me about $100 (one-time fee), and my phone service is about $3.50/mo. And I think there was a $10 number porting fee.

If you're paying $54/mo for phone, the VoIP pays for itself after only about 2 months. The voice quality is excellent, you can keep your number, the only problem is that the CID name doesn't always come through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
With landline usage dropping like flies you'd think the BDU's would lower the price of Basic landline service to 15 dollars a month at least. But nope!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
If you have good wifi in your residence, try using the free magic jack app on your cell phone.Its good for Canada and US calls.I use it when on vacation to call home to avoid the roaming charges.Would be good as a home backup service to make calls you dont want to get ate by minutes on your plan.Again its free......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I have the app on both cell phones. It works quite well on LTE or Wi-Fi. You also should have a newer fast smart phone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
I killed my POTS connection 3 years ago and went VOIP with a MagicJack. I make a number of Long Distance calls within Canada and US, and my cell package doesn't do it cheaply. With a MagicJack I pay $10/year for the number (CRTC rules, $0 if you live in the US). For unlimited calling in North America and Voice mail I bought the 5 year $99 USD package. This works out to be less than $2/month for VOIP. For that price, I decided to keep a landline.

With my Magic Jack line, I never get telemarketers. so I am happy. Plus with their IOS app, my mobile phone rings when my land line rings. In a Wifi zone, I can use my iPhone for unlimited calling as well.

For the above reasons, I have decided to keep a VOIP line.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,996 Posts
I've never had a landline. My parents ditched theirs years ago in favour of their cells. None of us have ever remotely missed it. We do our local calling on unlimited cell plans, and for long-distance calling we use Skype or phone dialing in Google Hangouts.

That said, I can see a couple of reasons why a landline would be valuable. If you have kids who are old enough to make phone calls, but you don't want them to have cell phones, a landline is the obvious solution. Also, if you live in an apartment/condo building with a phone buzzer system, they can usually only be routed to one phone, no matter how many people live there. My SO and I don't entertain enough to be affected by that, but if you do, it could be a big nuisance.
 
1 - 20 of 50 Posts
Top