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I am new to forum for posting but have lingered around for some time, thanks for all the useful info, hopefully I will be able to offer the same down the line.

My question relates to DVD sound output from my receiver. Connected through Opitcal to receiver. But the volume level required for playing DVD's is much greater than for Digital Cable box? To play a DVD I must listen to volume on receiver at around 50 db, and for Cable box around 65-70 db range?

This was the case even with my old Hitachi DVD with RCA audio, I thought opitical might remedy this with new set up and player but apparently not?

Have tried some minor tweaks in receiver menu but noting has prevailed as a solution.

Any help/comments?????
 

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The cable box has a volume control of its own, the DVD player doesnt.

Weird, I know this is wrong, but my old Kenwood receiver displayed volume in decibals which decreased as the volume increased. How do you explain that?
 

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My question, is why does it matter where you listen to movies, music, television?? Depending on your receiver, you may be able to boost line in dB, but other than that, there's really nothing you can do. But again, why does it matter? Just listen to where it sounds good on each different input. Its not like you're switching from DVD to TV to CD's back-to-back.


RNA, the decibels decrease, because as volume increases, the decibels are coming closer to 0, or the reference output in power of the receiver. I can set my receiver to absolute (decibels) or relative (a volume number) for volume display. I can also go above my 0 dB, so I could have a +1 or more volume displayed on my receiver in absolute display.
 

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I've found 5-10 dB difference on various channels of the Cable STB alone, with DD5.1 channels being the lowest.

Then the DVD player is different, as are various DVDs. There doesn't appear to be much standardization on sound levels. My turntable requires more boost too.

The "range" on my Yamaha would be from -35 dB to -55 dB for equivalent volumes.
 

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RNAChemist said:
Weird, I know this is wrong, but my old Kenwood receiver displayed volume in decibals which decreased as the volume increased. How do you explain that?
There should be a minus sign in front of those dB numbers. Its either missing or the minus segment is burned out.
 

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AS far as levels go , in the digital world there realy is no one standard. In broadcast some use -20 DBfs ( DBfs Decibels full scale 0 DB fs would translate to a digital FF ,16 bit all bits at 1, in other words you are at clipping) Anyway some use -20DBfs as a reference level. Some use -12DBfs some use -14DBfs.It depends on how much head room the individual broadcaster needs. On most CD and DVDs they look at the highest peak , set that at FF or 0DBfs and everthing else falls below it. There is always a trade off, too much head room and I end up not using all 16 bits, too little and loud passages end up in clipping. If they use a compressor to compress the dynamic range you start losing effect, I want that blast to be loud for effect but then my dialog may be too quite. Anyway it is a balancing act, with so many different sources and standards you end up with what we have, levels all over the place.
 

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I believe that, theoretically speaking, if you take a THX certified reciever, connect it to THX certified speakers, put them in a room size that corresponds with the particular THX spec (Select, Ultra), and cranked ti to 0dB, you'd get THX reference levels in the room.

I believe all the receiver manufacters thought it would be 'cool' to emulate this, but since there's no common reference, -10dB on one receiver can be nowhere close to -10dB on another.
 
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