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Heya..

I'm moving at the end of June to my new condo. I've got to move my plasma..

On the box, which I kept, it clearly states "Do not lie flat". Is this simply because at the store they don't want the weight of them all on top of each other? Or, perhaps it's because something happens if the plasma is flat?

FWIW - my buddy who has a 37" LCD also has that stamped on the box and working in the industry - I know LCDs can lie flat with out issues (think: laptops).


I'm going to move the plasma myself instead of the movers - mainly because I want it there a few days before my "move date" so I can mount it on the wall/paint the area, etc.

thanks, experts :)
 

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Hey, the reason for not laying the plasma flat is the preasure on the glass pannel when going over bumps or potholes. Unless your route is a smooth way i would not risk it.
 

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cool thanks... it's all of 5 or 6 blocks away - but if you know Montreal roads, you know they're pretty bumpy.

I'll keep it upright.. time to rent a minivan.
 

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There's a long thread on this topic in the plasma TV section at avsforum.com. steelers2005 is correct that the reason for the dont-lay-flat warning is the possibility of over-stressing the heavy glass panel and breaking it if you go over a big bump. That's why glass transportation trucks have those big frames on the side to keep the panes of glass upright. However, it's not likely to be an issue if you move it yourself with reasonable care, and nobody reported having any problem doing that in the avsforum thread. The warning is mainly for shipping companies that can tend to be a little careless with the goods.
 

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It's not just about breaking the glass. It's also the pressure it'll put on the underlying electronics by wobbling up and down has you drive. I wouldn't risk it.
 

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MarcP

That's mythology. Electronics are not harmed by "wobbling up and down". Does your car stereo fail while you're driving over bumpy roads? Take any electronic device you own and shake it up and down rapidly (not while internal moving parts like disk drives are moving!). No effect, huh? That's because all of these units went through a lot of sharp shocks and vibration while being transported from the factory in Asia to the store where you bought them. If there were routinely problems like connectors falling out of their sockets, the distributors would have a big problem, wouldn't they?

Ditto for ideas like the plasma cells will be harmed somehow by stress on the glass as it flexes. No evidence whatsoever. Same transportation problem as above.

It's all about transporting a big, heavy pane of glass that's supported at the sides only.
 

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Socketed chips certain can come loose when the circuit board they're on flexes.

I don't really know the answer to the question at hand, but I don't think it's *just* because the glass might break. Plasma boxes used to (at least) have tilt sensors on them which would tell you at a glance if the box was ever laid flat on it's way to the consumer. Broken glass would be pretty obvious, so the tilt sensor must have had a better reason for being there.
 

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The electronics analogy in post 6 is not a good one to use, as portable devices (like portable DVD players, Vehicle electronics, etc) are designed in a certain way to be able to withstand their environment - they may have isolation dampeners, etc.

Home electronics need not be designed this way and often are not. There are certain calculations that go into the design of home electronics, however, one would never transport a CRT-based RPTV on its back due to the possibility of damage.

That's not to say if you carefully transport a Plasma on its back that it will break the electronics, however, it was not designed for that, otherwise those "this side up" arrows would not exist and the tilt sensors that JG mentioned would also never have existed.

The glass issue is of course also valid, one would never carry a large piece of (thin) glass horizontally.

So, can you safely transport a 42" plasma on its back if you're careful? Probably. Would I transport my 58" plasma on its back - Definitely not.
 

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That's mythology. Electronics are not harmed by "wobbling up and down".
I meant the glass wobbling up and down. Don't you think it pushed down on the electronics? Re-read my post.
 

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MarcP: That would be a heck of a wobble to make the glass bend enough to press on the electronics! Certainly enough to break it.

57: While it sounds plausible that portable electronics would be better designed to handle shaking in multiple planes than home electronics, in fact there is little difference in design. The biggest challenge faced by most electronic devices is still shipping to the consumer. I defy you to make internal connectors come loose or chips fall out of sockets by shaking hard for a few minutes. Thermal creep and long-term vibration are much more effective at doing that.

While I wouldn't dream of advising anyone else how to transport their plasma TV home, I did transport my $3000 plasma TV home laying flat, and I didn't have a moment's concern about it. The rest of you feel free to be paranoid if you want. :D
 

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I did transport my $3000 plasma TV home laying flat, and I didn't have a moment's concern about it.
Of course you didn't because you were not risking anything. What would you have done if it didn't work when you got it home? Phoned the retailer and got them to give you a new one because the first one was 'defective'. The OP doesn't have that option as he is transporting his used plasma. I think he has already realized the best course of action for his move.
 

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Well,

a) I'm an experienced engineer, and capable of making my own judgments about the degree of risk.

b) The dealer helped me load it flat in the back of my station wagon.

Look, I'm not suggesting that it's a preferred option to lay it flat. It's more robust to transport it upright if you have the choice. Just that you shouldn't be overly paranoid about transporting it flat with reasonable care.

Anyway, if you are moving a used plasma TV that's not in the huge box, what you should do is just put it upright in your back seat and belt it in.
 

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Here ya go...

Sorry to bring this old post up again, but I am in the middle of a similar situation, and may be able to offer some insight...

Last weekend, I purchased a 52" LCD to be mounted on the wall. At the time of purchase, I was unaware of the "do not lie flat" recommendation and did not protest when two workers at the store opted to carefully slide the television in the original unopened box into the back of my SUV in a horizontal position so that it fit. After the 30 minute drive home, it remained untouched in the SUV until the next morning. Movers came to my house the next day (as I am currently relocating), loaded all of my furniture into the truck, and also removed the horizontal LCD from my SUV and into the back of the truck (again, horizontally).

Upon our arrival at the new house two hours away, everything was carefully unloaded and the box containing the LCD was returned to its upright position and we all left after the move was complete. The box remained unopened, as it displayed no physical evidence of exterior damage and I am waiting until this weekend to return to this house to paint, and of course, mount the television on the wall with the proper tools.

...I'll let you know what awaits me after I warily peel the original box and packaging away from what I hope is an undamaged, unharmed television.

Wish me luck.
 

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What I have been told by CE reps is that shipping flat panels (plasma or LCD) upright results in less breakage. This is especially true with bigger and heavier panels where you have a big expanse of glass. If you've ever seen glass racks on a truck, it makes sense.

Can you lay a flat panel down? Sure, but you are increasing your risk.
 

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Some things you stand Up - Others you don't

Here's my logic, on this...

Consider 5 Plasma's or LCD's in their respective boxes stacked vertically (Upwrite), side by side. Common sense dictates that your risking them falling over, as dominoes would do. Now consider why multiple pizza's are stacked horizontally and not vertically when delivered ;)

On the other hand, if the manufacturer of a Plasma or LCD takes the time to indicate through the use of arrows on the cardboard box holding the contents, a particular direction to be adhered to, then this schould be the practice employed. Chances are that adequate packing material has been employed to rigedly hold the product in place and protect the contents, when stacked in the direction indicated. To ignore these instructions invites disastrous results to occur. Again, your common sense should prevail.

Cheers
 

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Common sense dictates that your risking them falling over, as dominoes would do.
Only if there's space between then to allow one to fall over the other. But even with spacing, the center of gravity is also too low to allow that.

In reality, they're all packed together with plastic wrapping around them to hold them together. So how does your analogy hold?
 

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I recently moved from Burlington to Ottawa which is about a 5.5 hour drive. I put my 43 inch plasma flat (don't have the box anymore) in the trunk of my car with the seats folded down. The entire thing was wrapped in a few layers of really fine bubble wrap and lying on a few blankets. I figured that this would still be better than being shaken to bits in the back of a truck (whether vertical or horizontal).

The TV is working better than ever so they're not that fragile after all.
 

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Step 1 of 2 completed...

Just arrived at the new house so that I may begin painting tomorrow. Couldn't wait any longer, so I carefully peeled the cardboard box away from the television.

No visible damage... Yessss!!

Tomorrow morning (so as not to disturb the rest of the household's sleep), I'll plug it in just to make sure it's strong and healthy. Fingers crossed.

Keep ya posted.
 
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