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I just had Optik installed yesterday and so far it is working great. My question is whether I need to actually use the D-Link Router.

Currently, it is set up as

Line ---> VDSL Modem ---> Telus D-Link Gateway --(Cat 5)--> Optik Boxes and Computers

Ideally, I would like to use my Apple Airport Extreme Dual Band Router for a number of reasons including Dual Band N, Gigabit Router and easier management.

Is there any reason I need to use the Dlink box?
 

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I'm interested in finding this out too. From what I was told by the Telus installer, there are QoS (Quality of Service) features that the D-Link does that prioritizes the IPTV traffic (so that TV takes priority over Internet traffic), so it might not be possible to use any other kind of router other than the one they provide.

Personally, I don't trust D-Link hardware (and their method of setting the options is absolutely absurd), and have far more faith in Linksys (also considering they're owned by Cisco, and they make the DVR box too).

Can anyone weigh in on this, please, and let us know your experience if you've changed your router and used it instead of the provided D-Link box? Also, if you did change it to your own, any recommended settings you used for your router?
 

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You have to use it for Optik, but you don't have to for your internal network. My setup:

Line --> VDSL Modem --> Telus D-Link Gateway

Port #1 D-link Gateway --> Optik box
Port #2 D-link Gateway --> your own linksys router

Then hook up all your computers to your linksys router. You can also disable the wireless with the Telus provided dlink, and just use your own.
 

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It's the 'why do we have to use it' that I'm interested in. If it's a matter of QoS setup, then we should get the settings for it, and be able to set them in our own, preferred routers, and still get the same level of service. Granted, the D-Link has been tested by Telus to perform to their standard, but that doesn't mean that we can't use something better if we have it. Just a matter of setting it up properly. Any other thoughts out there?
 

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The Dlink is also set up in Routed mode, not bridged mode like most other routers.

You could also just try using your Apple Airport Extreme and just see if it works.

Here is possibly a better solution to adding your Apple Airport Extreme to the Optik setup could be.

VDSL modem---> Port 1 of ethernet Switch

Port 2 out of ethernet switch---> LAN port on Telus Dlink router for Optik
Port 3 out of ethernet Switch---> Apple Airport Extreme.

That way the Airport Extreme will grab its own IP from the VDSL modem and not go through the Dlink at all. You are allowed 2 IP's from Telus. They will both be independent networks.

If you just plug the Airport Extreme into the Dlink router it will work, but now you are going through 2 routers adding a delay. Also, if you want to port forward anything, you need to forward the ports on both routers possibly making things unnecessarily complicated.

I'm surprised the Telus tech didn't try to incorporate the Apple Airport Extreme in your network if you said you wanted to use it.
 

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Just to clarify what dscott01 is saying... if you use a home router instead of an Ethernet switch, make sure that the VDSL modem is connected to a LAN port, and NOT the WAN (Internet) port on the router. Otherwise, the way he's described it won't work.

So you'll be using a total of 3 ports on your Ethernet switch/home router: 1 for the connection from the VDSL modem, 1 for your own router, and 1 for the D-Link router. Keep in mind that it's the WAN (Internet) ports on both your own router and the D-Link that you'll want to use, since that's the only way they would grab their own IP's.
 

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There are two ways to accomplish this.

The first way is to go from the ethernet port of the VDSL modem to the WAN port of the D-Link (this is how TELUS installs OPTIK). Next, before you plug it in to the network, set your router to the 172.16.0.1 address scheme rather than the 192.168.1.254 scheme that most routers use. Now plug your router's WAN port into one of the LAN ports on the D-Link. This will work but you're still passing your traffic through the D-Link.

The BETTER way is to plug the VDSL modem into a switch, then plug the D-Link WAN port into the switch. As before change your router to the 172.16.0.1 address range then plug it into the switch as well.

TELUS gives all of its OPTIK TV customers two dynamic IPs, so using the second method allows TELUS's D-Link to provide service to the TVs using the first dynamic IP, the second is used for your router. This way all of the traffic from your home PCs and wireless devices is passed through your router and the OPTIK TV service is passed through the D-Link the way TELUS wants it. Its also good idea to turn off the WiFi in the D-Link entirely no matter which method you choose and let your router handle this too.

Previous posts have covered this, except they don't mention changing the address of your router to the 172.16.0.1 range. While it is true that the STBs don't use the 192.168.1.254 IP range from the D-Link, changing the address in your router ensures there won't be any conflicts that affect your network's performance. You get to use the router you want, and the OPTIK TV uses the router TELUS wants, and neither interferres with the other.
 

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There are two ways to accomplish this.

The first way is to go from the ethernet port of the VDSL modem to the WAN port of the D-Link (this is how TELUS installs OPTIK). Next, before you plug it in to the network, set your router to the 172.16.0.1 address scheme rather than the 192.168.1.254 scheme that most routers use. Now plug your router's WAN port into one of the LAN ports on the D-Link. This will work but you're still passing your traffic through the D-Link.

The BETTER way is to plug the VDSL modem into a switch, then plug the D-Link WAN port into the switch. As before change your router to the 172.16.0.1 address range then plug it into the switch as well.

TELUS gives all of its OPTIK TV customers two dynamic IPs, so using the second method allows TELUS's D-Link to provide service to the TVs using the first dynamic IP, the second is used for your router. This way all of the traffic from your home PCs and wireless devices is passed through your router and the OPTIK TV service is passed through the D-Link the way TELUS wants it. Its also good idea to turn off the WiFi in the D-Link entirely no matter which method you choose and let your router handle this too.

Previous posts have covered this, except they don't mention changing the address of your router to the 172.16.0.1 range. While it is true that the STBs don't use the 192.168.1.254 IP range from the D-Link, changing the address in your router ensures there won't be any conflicts that affect your network's performance. You get to use the router you want, and the OPTIK TV uses the router TELUS wants, and neither interferres with the other.
Wiremonkey, I believe you are incorrect.

You do not need to change the IP address range of the Apple Airport Express. Most other routers other than Telus use 192.168.0.254 so there is no need to change the routers IP address range. I'm not sure of the IP address range of the Apple Airport Express, but I do know that it doesn't use the 192.168.1.254 range.

It is good advice to turn off the wireless in the Dlink if you plan on using another device for the wireless
 

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when i had Optik installed in July they did not use a telus supplied router
but used my original Linksys WRT54G router. he just plugged in a switch.
 

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-Linksys routers use the same default IP range as the Telus dlink, so you can't plug the Wan port of the router into a lan port on the Telus Dlink unless you change the IP range of one of them (to 168.192.0.x, for example)
-consumer Dlink routers come set to to 0.254 by default so they work fine plugged into a lan port on the Telus Dlink
-Some routers are autodetecting, so if they are assigned a 1.254 address on the wan port, then they'll automatically use a different ip range for their own local network
-Plugging your router wan port into a dlink lan port might work, but the double nat can cause higher pings, so it will sometimes work better to set your router to AP-only mode, or connect lan port to lan port
-The simplest and most reliable method if you want to use your own modem is to use a switch after the VDSL2 modem (not everyone has this modem, people who were hooked up early this year/late last year will only have the Dlink) and plug both customer and telus router wan ports into it
-Running separate networks isn't a long term solution. For example, people using an xBox as an STB won't be able to stream media from their PC to the xBox if they're on separate networks. In the future, the new MS Mediaroom software will allow people to use their STB as Media Center extenders, so you can use your STB to pull up pics/vids/music from your PC.
-Some consumer routers might work fine with Mediaroom. I've seen one customer try with his own dlink router, but the STB couldn't join the multicast stream and froze 10 seconds after each channel change. YMMV.
-It's a good idea to disable the wireless on the dlink if you do run your own router, to reduce the interference.
-There is new firmware being trialed for the dlink that should fix most of the issues - release date unknown.
-There is a new all-in-one VDSL2 modem/router with HCNA, wireless N, and gigabit lan ports, and wifi protected setup, release is very close.

-Telus tech, but my views are my own.
 

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Not sure why you feel the need to use your own router... the D-Link works fine for me, but its wireless sucks. So I use an Airport Express I've had for ages, just putting it into bridge mode. Had to also put a switch behind the TV to handle all the devices there! Have been running fine for approaching 2 months.
 

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Yes I have one. Its been launched in select areas for the last couple months. Many customers have this in their home already.
 

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The new Actiontec modem is MUCH better. Finally Telus seems to have a quality piece of equipment.

I didn't think too many people had the new modem yet.
 

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I am currently not using the telus D-Link router as I've had nothing but problems. The first day that telus installed the optik tv system.. I had disconnects and few other issues, Also I found the router confusing and hard to understand. Nor was it great for hooking the rest of my equipment. I also had issues trying play World of warcraft with the D-Link. I wanted to use my router orginaly when they installed but the installed talked me into using stupid D-Link. I hated it.. 3-4 days after install I said heck with it and have been using my router since.. Late Sept/2010.

My current router has been more stable then stupid D-Link. My router is also N wireless.

I am currently using

Telus Dsl modem (small black one)
\ (not sure which one and can't look atm)
\/
Linksys WRT160Nv3- 4 ports
1 Pcs
1 Xbox 360 s 250 gig Hd
1 Cisco 430 PVR to LG 42 Inch HD tv via HDMI
1 Wireless Playstaion 3
\
\/
1 Linksys hub
\
\/
1 pc
1 Cisco 330 HD to old 27 inch TV

I've been running this setting for last 2 month with very few issues. I've had the odd hick up which just the net drops, If anything I think my picture is bit clearer.

But just last week my hard drive on my PVR 430 crashed. I lost everything..

The only reason I think Telus want to to use D-Link is so they can access your PVR/HD Set top boxs..

All the connections are Ethernet wired..

Weither Telus like this setup or not. I do not know. But my tv here in calgary have been pretty good/Stable when using my own router..

and Guess what the PVR's/HD ipbox are made by same company that makes Linksys routers... Cisco..

So you tell me which makes more sense?
 

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*Update Dec 17/2010*

1) The only issue I've had (Which has been reported) is my 2nd PVR sometime will record same show twice..
Telus tech on phone told me that have notify Microsoft
and are quickly waiting for update and a Fix.

2) Sound has been very very low lately. Causing me to
turn the tv up very loud for some HD channels.

I am still currently using the same setup.
I also updated my Linksys router which fixed a few Xbox connection issues.

Telus tech have told me that it is fine if I use my own router as long as I'm happy. I tried there newest High Speed Modem - Alcatel Lucent 7130 (silver one)
and tried to get it to work. Having just it hooked for the tvs then have hooked to my Linksys to feed the rest my equipment. We could not get it to work.. I fought with for good 45 mins before I phone the tech that drop it off to bring back my old original DLS black modem.

I'm back with my original setup.
Telus Dsl modem (small black one)
\
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Linksys WRT160Nv3- 4 ports
1 Pcs
1 Xbox 360 s 250 gig Hd
1 Cisco 430 PVR to LG 42 Inch HD tv via HDMI
1 Wireless Playstaion 3
\
\/
1 Linksys hub
\
\/
1 pc
1 Cisco 330 HD to old 27 inch TV
----

This has been best setup. my PVR is set in my router as DMZ zone... Weither that is needed or not I don't know..

The only good thing about there new DSL/Router in one? It supported 10/100/1000 speed.. my Linksys Router only supports 10/100.
 

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Yes anything that is recorded on the main Pvr. You can go to your 2nd tv/bedroom and watch on basic HD box/set top box.. I've done this a few time with no problems. Prob be same thing if you have Xbox 360 and use it a set top box.. I do own 360 but it's not setup for it.

The only issue is there sometimes a 2-5 sec delay when your fast forwarding and you hit pause,or play again..
I wish they'd add a slow option. You know your watching fast action and you miss something..Other then that. Its been good :)
 
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