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Sounds to me like Rogers putting a marketing spin on this.

But under the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's rules, telecom companies must first get prior consent for such activities.
So, the way I read it, they wanted people to buy more minutes. While it may have helped some people save their numbers it would also mean they are generating more revenue via the calls... i.e. telemarketing.

If the rules say they must get prior consent and they didn't then they are guilty. :)
 

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At the opposite end of the scale, Bell let my minutes expire rather than notify me. That resulted in the loss of $85 in rollover minutes. It's not that I forgot either. I updated my pay-as-you-go credit card information on their web site. I expected the account to be active. As the CSR said, "Oh, we don't look at that." As a result, they stopped the automatic top ups and let my account expire. Why is it they are allowed to make useless phone solicitations for services I don't want but are not allowed to notify me about loss of service?
 

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why in gods name is Rogers giving $275,00 to the École polytechnique de Montréal and to the British Columbia Institute of Technology?

That money belongs to taxpayers, its not charity.
 

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Its because Rogers settled before actually having any decisions handed down against them ... which would have resulted in an administrative monetary penalty.


Rogers has not admitted fault with regard to its use of automated calling devices. However, upon being made aware of the CRTC’s concerns, the company voluntarily undertook to:

-immediately cease making these types of calls to its prepaid mobile customers without obtaining their prior express consent

- make a monetary payment of $175,000 to the École polytechnique de Montréal and $100,000 to the British Columbia Institute of Technology, and

- review its compliance policies to ensure ongoing adherence with the CRTC’s rules relating to automated calling devices.

The CRTC applies the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules in order to reduce unwanted calls to Canadians. According to the established enforcement process, the CRTC can discuss corrective actions with telemarketers, which may lead to a settlement that includes a monetary penalty or monetary payment. The amount of Rogers’s payment is proportionate to its overall share of the prepaid mobile market.

To date, the CRTC has collected over $1.8 million in penalties on behalf of the Receiver General for Canada in addition to over $740,000 in payments to post-secondary institutions.
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/com100/2011/r110324.htm


Its better for Rogers this way since on a marketing basis they are "volunteering" corrective action and making donations.
 
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