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Discussion Starter #1
What are your guys thoughts on Cat 8 cable’s? I have my PS4 hardwired(very old cat 5) and I’m still amazed at how slow it appears to be downloading. The few games that I buy per year I strictly buy from the PS-Store so they are all digital. I think I’m due for an upgrade. I ran a speed test on my Apple TV which is also hardwired but with a newer cable and I get 300 down and 80 up but on the PS4 it’s lot slower. I purchased the new Avengers game the other night and started the download and it was indicating 3hrs to finish for 50 gigs, although I turned off the tv and came back an hour & half later and it was all done so I’m not sure exactly how long it took. I was going to get a Cat 6 cable like I did for my newer hardwired connections but I stumbled on the cat 8 on Amazon and it had such high reviews that it has me thinking about it.


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Why bother? Gigabit Ethernet was designed to run 100 M over plain CAT 5 cable, before there was even CAT 5e. Do you really think that cable will make any difference whatsoever? If you do, I've got this bridge I can sell you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That was my thoughts on it as well but I was proven wrong on HDMI cables as I used to tell everyone that they were all the same and no need for new cables but when I made the upgrade to 4K and used my old HDMI’s from 2006-8 nothing worked right and I wasn’t getting 4K or HDR so I had to upgrade to new cables and then everything started working as it should. It is definitely possible that my PS4 itself could be the issue. I might try connecting it to WiFi 5gh and see if I can get the full speed.


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Well, it's your money to waste. But given CAT 5 was designed to work over 100 M, what difference would you expect with a patch cord? Maybe you can find some Monster cables, if you really want to waste your money. Take a look at the specs for the various Ethernet rates and cables. You'll find CAT 8 talks about 2 GHz. Gigabit Ethernet has a signalling rate of about 125 MHz, IIRC. Do you really need a cable that can handle 2 GHz?

Here's some info:
What is a Cat8 Ethernet Cable and How is it Different?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I’m thinking I’ll go with the Amazon Basics cat 6. I only need about 30 feet but the 50ft is $18


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CAT5 is rated at 100Mbps but may deliver more at shorter lengths. A damaged cable may deliver less. I'd test the connection with another device or try the PS4 on another cable to determine if the problem is with the PS4 or the cable.

Apart from maximum design speed, cable length is also a factor. My preference is CAT5e for shorter patch cables. That's because CAT5e is more flexible and will easily deliver 1Gbps. For longer lengths, future proofing and cables that are not easily upgraded, CAT6a or CAT7 are the best bet. CAT6a and CAT7 are capable of providing 10Gbps at lengths up to 100m. CAT6 can deliver 10Mbps at short distances. Speeds over 1Gbps are rarely required for home use at the current time so CAT5e is fine for the immediate future.

Pass on CAT8 unless you need speeds of 25Mbps to 40Mbps. That's probably useful for business environments but totally wasted for home use. Be aware that CAT8 cables may have connectors other than RJ45 which would make them incompatible with home networks.

Another factor is the increased use of wireless for home environments. Real Wifi speeds are rapidly approaching 1Gbps which will make most current Ethernet cables in homes obsolete. Never mind that most devices rarely require speeds approaching 1Gbps.
 

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Let me tell you a bit about my background. I have many years experience as a tech, initially in the telecom industry, more recently working with networks. I have done certification testing of cables I have installed in offices and prior to that bit error rate testing of microwave systems and older telecom channels. I can assure you, you will not see any difference between CAT5 & CAT6. Also, if connected to something you're likely to move around, you may find CAT5 better, as CAt6 is thicker and stiffer.

Here's a little incident that happened to me at a customer's office a couple of years ago. I set up a network, complete with a Cisco switch, and the office was cabled with CAT6. The customer got annoyed with me because I used my CAT5 cable to connect my computer to the switch. She seemed to think that would cause problems for the network. And she knew this because her husband had read magazines! There's a lot of misinformation going around, as people take a little bit of knowledge and make it into more than it is. So, at 1 Gb, plain CAT5 is good enough. You would use 6A or 7, if you're running 10 Gb. Look at what CAT8 is good for. You're not likely to be running 25 Gb, unless you're a data centre or carrier. Also, note that CAT7 & 8 are shielded cables, which will make them even more difficult to work with.

BTW, my experience with Ethernet goes back over 30 years, to the days of 10base5 coaxial cable & DECnet.
 

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CAT5 is rated at 100Mbps but may deliver more at shorter lengths. A damaged cable may deliver less. I'd test the connection with another device or try the PS4 on another cable to determine if the problem is with the PS4 or the cable.

Apart from maximum design speed, cable length is also a factor. My preference is CAT5e for shorter patch cables. That's because CAT5e is more flexible and will easily deliver 1Gbps.

From Ethernet - The Definitive Guide 2nd ed., by Charles Spurgeon, pg. 157:

1000BASE-T cabling requirements

A 1000BASE-T system operates at the same signaling rate over the cable as the 100BASE-
TX system. However, the complex signaling techniques used in 1000BASE-T are more
sensitive to certain signal performance issues on twisted-pair cable segments. Therefore,
it’s important that all twisted-pair cables and other components used in a 1000BASE-T
segment meet or exceed the Category 5 signal-carrying specifications to properly handle
the signals. The commonly used Category 5e cable has improved signal-carrying capa‐
bilities
, and you can also use cables with even higher signal quality ratings, such as
Category 6 and 6A.

So, plain CAT5, if you can still find it, is good enough for Gb.


As I mentioned, Gb was designed to run on CAT5.
 

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My mistake, I misread 100MHz as 100Mb. CAT5 was designed for 1Gb. Other than that, I still recommend using CAT6e and CAT7 for cables in walls and other difficult to replace locations. The difference in cost is small compared to the cost of replacement. For patch cables, CAT5 and CAT5e are fine but I would purchase CAT5e for a new cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I’m going to try my 5gh WiFi/do a swap with my Apple TV first to see if there is any difference before I look at purchasing another patch cable. I know my Amazon firestick won’t do anything over 100mbps hardwired with their adaptor so I use that WiFi as well and get close to 300 Mbps If I do get another cable Amazon Basics Cat 6 is dirt cheap from what I’ve seen and I won’t go with the cat 8 as it looks like overkill based on the replies here. Thanks


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PSN and PS4 can be slow to download stuff sometimes no matter how fast your internet is. The PS4 can also be brutally slow to actually install things after downloaded due to the mechanical disk in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think you are right. When I ran a speed test I was getting 150 mbps Down on the PS4 and with the same cable on my Apple TV I was getting 300 Down/80 Up, so I’m losing half my speed on the PS4. Hopefully the PS5 will fair better.


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