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As if Bell is one to talk about stealing. They've been ripping off Canadians for a long time!

I don't think they are going to get much sympathy.
 

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More FUD and whining from Bell. Maybe they should start acting ethically before casting blame on Canadians. Making CraveTV available to all Canadians would be a good start. Then they could make their TV services more affordable. Then how about making CTV available OTA in all major cities and converting their remaining analog transmitters to digital?
 

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oh man more BS by BELL i don't think they just dicovered the use of proxies and VPN they just can't compete so the easy way is to complain to government about us bad canadians it's a kind of ''deja vu'' with BELL does anyone remember the early days of dish network in canada before 2004 ???
 

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The current government has already passed a law aimed at regulating proxy server companies and Canadians that use them. Bell's next step is to try and make their use illegal, just like they did with US satellite services. The root of the problem is that copyrights are too compartmentalized by country and region. Their is no reason that buying streamed content cannot be like buying physical media. If that barrier was removed, all the Bell BS would go away. Broadcasting and copyrights are the last bastion of trade protectionism and that needs to be removed. Why should every other Canadian worker be subjected free trade and world competition while broadcasting remains protected? It doesn't make sense. The only answer is that companies like Bell and the big studios have too much to gain from the current system and too much influence in politics.
 

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I wonder if the media stopped publishing and reporting such nonsense would that shut up these morons who are only looking out for their own selfish interests and not the consumer?
 

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Nowadays, Bell finds itself so far out of its core of business that it's running out of sain arguments to, dare I say, attract customers or pitty.

In astromomical terms, Bell has gone from being a good old sun (until the late 90s) to a red giant (when it swelled trying to be everything in the 2000s) to end up as a white dwarf, losing critical mass on all fronts.
 

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The current government has already passed a law aimed at regulating proxy server companies and Canadians that use them.
But you can't make VPNs illegal as there is a very large business purpose for them. I use a VPN whenever I am connecting into my coroprate LAN while travelling. If you do that and your VPN is configured to send all network traffic through the VPN then it looks like I am browsing the web from Toronto, even though I may be in Hong Kong. How can they make that illegal? It is pretty much required for corporate WANs unless everyone is expected to use leased lines which is unrealistic.
 

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Bell and Rogers should go after Netflix for not enforcing their customer agreement regarding bypassing geoblocking. If HBO can do it so could Netflix. The international rules should be followed, otherwise some businesses will be at a disadvantage, where others will profit.
 

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But you can't make VPNs illegal as there is a very large business purpose for them. I use a VPN whenever I am connecting into my coroprate LAN while travelling. If you do that and your VPN is configured to send all network traffic through the VPN then it looks like I am browsing the web from Toronto, even though I may be in Hong Kong. How can they make that illegal? It is pretty much required for corporate WANs unless everyone is expected to use leased lines which is unrealistic.
There's a big difference between corporate VPN and private (consumer) VPNs.

For the sake of argument, most people do not need to mask or spoof their location when accessing the internet. Corporate VPNs use the "tunnel" for security reasons, there is typically no legitimate reason why the average consumer needs to. And that is why VPNs can "technically" be illegal if it is not restricted to a corporate environment.
 

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apparently whoever runs bell then knows nothing about business and competition. simply if you make multiple versions of a product and there is only one good version of it then people will flock to that one. i know its difficult butt until they are able to have parity between the US and Canadian versions (even globally) then everyone will keep doing this
 

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Corporate VPNs use the "tunnel" for security reasons, there is typically no legitimate reason why the average consumer needs to. And that is why VPNs can "technically" be illegal if it is not restricted to a corporate environment.
There are lots of legitimate consumer uses of VPNs:

  1. Security - so that others can't sniff your traffic while your using wifi in public places like Starbucks, a hotel, an airport, etc.
  2. Access sites while travelling that aren't available in the country where you currently are - like a Canadian using Facebook/Twitter/Google from China.
  3. Accessing services on your home LAN while away, like viewing IP cameras or home automation web services like an irrigation controller, etc.
 

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There are lots of legitimate consumer uses of VPNs:

  1. Security - so that others can't sniff your traffic while your using wifi in public places like Starbucks, a hotel, an airport, etc.
  2. Access sites while travelling that aren't available in the country where you currently are - like a Canadian using Facebook/Twitter/Google from China.
  3. Accessing services on your home LAN while away, like viewing IP cameras or home automation web services like an irrigation controller, etc.
Those are all very valid reasons, but they aren't many. While not technically illegal in China (yet), China has blocked many VPN providers.

Like already mentioned, the vast majority of people don't use a VPN for the above purposes you posted. Whether or not they should, that's a different discussion.
 

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And that is why VPNs can "technically" be illegal if it is not restricted to a corporate environment.
There are many reasons why consumers may want to use a VPN. One example, is when you're using a public WiFi hotspot. A VPN can be used to keep others from snooping. Just set your default route through the tunnel and they won't see anything useful. Also, it's entirely possible to run a VPN through an HTTPS connection. Are those going to be banned too? Say goodbye to secure online banking. People shouldn't lose rights, just because some business doesn't like those rights.

Here's what Michael Geist has to say about this:
 

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Yes, hiding your true location using VPN's is very sneaky. I've heard that some companies use VPN's to hide the actual location of their Customer Service Reps or other personnel so consumers think the people are located inside the country or servers are local. You know, act local but actually located in India or something.

Here is one company that enables this kind of activity :wink
https://business.bell.ca/shop/enterprise/ip-vpn-service
 

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he was speaking about the majority of people who are not as technicality inclined as the people who frequent this site or know anything about VPN or the internet. the majority of people will not use VPN because they don't know or understand VPN and the benefits. you are all making very good points about the legality of VPN but unfortunately you (we) are in the minority
 

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There was a reason why individual people were given the vote and not corporations ... struggling to remember why that was now?
 
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