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Canadian DTV Transition Articles, Sites

Here's a magazine article I found that has comments from CBC and other broadcasters.

http://www.tvtechnology.com/article/105462

Of note, CBC says the DTV transition will consumes its entire capital budget over the next two years and it wishes the government would help with the costs — the latter is something it has not stated publicly before. (It's certainly not in their FAQ.)

CTV says it wishes the government would help with the capital costs of the DTV transition.

Rogers calls Canada's DTV transition "a fascinating mess."

Of note, the quotes from Global TV's representative in the story do not reflect Shaw's line on an aggressive approach to DTV conversion.
 

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From that article:
To keep watching TV after August 31, 2011, such households will need to buy set-top boxes at an average cost of $75.
Unbelievable that an article on the TV Technology site would make such a glaringly misleading statement. Too bad an editor didn't reword it as: "To keep watching TV after August 31, 2011, such households might need to buy a set-top box at an average cost of $75 for each older set that doesn't already contain an ATSC tuner."
 

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Hardly surprising, as the only way you can watch entertainment is over a cable or satellite connection.
 

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CTV says it wishes the government would help with the capital costs of the DTV transition.
pffftttt !!!!

Some entrepreneurs. They have the technogical means at a very small cost compared to their overall capitalization, during a time of historically low interest rates, to provide a far superior product to consumers, getting more eyes away from youtube and low-quality pirated videos and back on hi-def screens where they can sell more ads and make more money, and instead they whine for a handout.

Hey CTV! If you would quit whining for subsidies, the gummint could cut taxes, and people would have more money in their pockets, and they'd spend more on your services and on your advertisers' products. And the money they don't spend, which they are saving for a rainy day, they could invest in your company and help you make profits.

I am not saying that the government should force anybody to transition to anything. I don't think that the government should have anything whatsoever to do with any kind of telecommunications [*]. But c'mon you guys ... if you can't hack it with a near-monopoly granted to you and nearly total protection from foreign competition, then you might as well quit calling yourself a business person and go apply for a government job.

[* - The Case for Private Airwaves ]
 

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This is all just a bunch of BS. They did it in the U.S. and got it done somewhat smoothly. The broadcasters are just whiners.
 

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I think it makes sense for the government to help the CBC with the digital transition. The government stands to make $billions from the sale of freed up bandwidth. Spending a few $million to provide a state of the art public broadcasting service will cost taxpayers nothing. While they are at it, maybe they can revamp the CBC's mandate to make it meet the needs of Canadians. IMHO, the CBC is the correct vehicle to fulfill the CRTC's mandate to protect Canadian culture. Then they can cut the other networks loose, allow more competition and let them sink or swim on their own merits.
 

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Let's see...how does $1B-$1MM = $999MM not be less than $1B? Therefore it costs taxpayers something when you spend money no matter how much you make elsewhere!. The whole bureaucratic nonsense about "it didn't cost anything we just borrowed from another budget are" is so nonsensical.
Used in Calgary during the Olympics, used in Vancouver during the Olympics and now here for the CBC??:)

Any time you spend money and it doesn't cost the taxpayer money....scary indeed! Read the middle paragraph by Joshh...now tha's pure logic!
 

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gzink, I agree with you and that it would cost something, but I also agree with ScaryBob that since the money won't be coming from tax revenue, but instead a one time influx of funding, it won't have a direct effect on taxes (though it will have an indirect effect).

The CBC is in a bit of a unique situation in that although they do show programs that make them money (like HNIC), they also show programs as a pubic service that have no hope (or even possible way) of making money (like CBC Kids). As a result it is harder for them to raise the money needed to do the upgrades, so help from the government is necessary.

One thing that no one has talked about here is the effect all of this will have on CBC radio. Most of the transmission facilities are shared by both TV and radio and so the common costs are shared by both. If CBC TV stops transmitting, those costs will need to be covered by CBC radio completely, resulting in them needing more funding.
 

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It amazes me that we've got the CRTC there to protect us (ha ha), but we end up losing HD digital programming that is replaced with a signal that's severely inferior which forces us to either buy premium packages from Bell/Rogers/Videotron/etc., or download our shows. Bell doesn't even transmit CHCH in HD. So to watch my WB in HD shows I'll definitely need to download them. It doesn't seem right that this nonsense goes on. We all know that there are many crap programs on the air in digital HD right now. It sucks that great shows like this are gone.
 

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Looks like the files were put up at the end of August 2010.

Better late than never. The information seems fairly accurate, although they don't differentiate between digital transitions that are happenning to individual analog stations that were above channel 51, and those that are in madatory markets.

For example, if I live in Foymount, then my out-of-core CBC repeater on channel 59 will convert to digital on some other channel, but the six of the seven analog Pembroke area stations I can get will not. (The Chapeau Tele-Quebec station will convert.)
 

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They mention that tuners in Canada should meets the BETS-7 - Technical Standards and Requirements. Does this mean that some cross border shopper may have purchased tuners that may not work efficiently with the Canadian digital ATSC broadcasts ?

BETS-7 - Technical Standards and Requirements for Radio Apparatus Capable of Receiving Television Broadcasting:
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01229.html
 

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downbeat,
good one...

just considering ontario:

crtc
Ontario: Toronto (including Barrie and Hamilton), London, Windsor, Kitchener and Thunder Bay
heritage canada
Ontario: Belleville, Brighton, Chatham, Cloyne, Fort Erie, Foymount, Kitchener, London, Muskoka, Oil Springs, Peterborough, Thunder Bay, Toronto (including Barrie and Hamilton), and Windsor
 

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They mention that tuners in Canada should meets the BETS-7
I'd be very surprised if a converter or TV purchased in the U.S. wouldn't work here. I expect I.C. just wanted to put their own label on things. Makes them feel as though they're actually doing something. ;-)
 

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Heritage Canada is including locations where stations have indicated they are going to change. Belleville TVO is on 53 so is moving to a digital location, same with Cloyne. Fort Erie is losing Global and is going to be covered by the Toronto digital station.

Good to see the information is fairly accurate about who is affected.
 

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Heritage Canada is including locations where stations have indicated they are going to change.
That is exactly it. The CRTC is listing the mandatory markets where as Heritage Canada is listing the markets where stations will be changing (including some markets that aren't mandatory) mostly because of stations being out of band post transition.

If Shaw's plans to migrate all of Global TV's transmitters comes to fruition, Heritage Canada's list will have to grow substantially larger.
 

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The CRTC has set out some proposed regulations around public service annoucements (PSAs) informing the public about the digital transition:

http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2010/2010-927.htm

Their proposal calls for broadcasters to begin with at least six PSAs per day starting on March 1, 2011 (or six months in advance, if a station plans to shut down analog before the deadline) and increasing to eight per day starting on August 1, 2011 (or one month in advance of an early analog shutdown).

The deadline for submitting comments is January 11.
 
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