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My neighbor has FibeTV. He is hard of hearing. His remote is bluetooth and the menu on his receiver has an option for pairing BT devices.
Does anyone know if Bluetooth headphone can be paired and used instead of TV speakers?
 

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Can't speak to whether the TV supports Bluetooth headphones (a make and model number is required) but separate Bluetooth transmitters can be purchased. Elimination of latency and voice sync issues requires the use of the Aptx-ll (low latency) codec. The Bluetooth transmitter (or TV) and headphones both need to support Aptx-ll. Most audiophile Bluetooth headphones do not support this codec.

Another option is to use wireless headphones that do not use Bluetooth. Some headphones use a proprietary transmitter and receiver to eliminate latency. These are often sold as gaming headphones. They would be connected to the TV's audio output port, as would a Bluetooth transmitter.

The 5 Best TV Headphones 2020 Reviews
 

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I don't think I was clear enough. I want to know if Bluetooth headphones can be paired to the Bell receiver since its remote is Bluetooth and phones/tablets can be paired to it. Simplest solution would be if I can just pick him up a pair of headphones and let the receiver do the rest.
I wonder if someone who has a Fibe receiver and a pair of BT headphones could try to pair them and see what happens?
TIA
 

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Well maybe you will get an answer but is not the BT pairing just remote control stuff. That would be a far cry from actually having audio as part of the package(at least as far as this techie knows) hence the reply you got.
 

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I want to know if Bluetooth headphones can be paired to the Bell receiver since its remote is Bluetooth and phones/tablets can be paired to it.
The short answer is no. The only Bell receiver that supports a Bluetooth remote is the 4K PVR. There are many different Bluetooth profiles and Bluetooth audio and remote control are different. I should qualify this by saying that I don't have a 4K PVR so I can't actually test it.

I think the pairing you saw on the Bell receiver menu refers to programming the Bluetooth remote to control your specific TV model via infrared, by sending a "pairing code" to the remote.

The Bell Fibe smartphone app doesn't use Bluetooth. It communicates to the Bell modem using Wi-Fi.
 

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Just as an FYI, Rogers IgniteTV (IPTV) does have a method for pairing BT headphones. There are instructions for that on the Rogers website. I don't know if Bell (or other providers) offer something similar. Quite a few people have had issues making this work though, often due to BT delays due to version used, etc.


I did recently utilize a BT transmitter/receiver and included a link in the above thread, however, that was for a different application. One could probably use one for connection to the TV instead of the STB if the box doesn't have appropriate outputs. For a BT TX you'd need to have the appropriate connections on all devices (TV output, BT TX itself and the HP input(s). Also, when using a TV output (like say Optical) you'd need to go into the TV menu to enable that output (external speakers) and this usually turns off the TV's internal speakers. I do not know what output(s) the Bell box has.
 

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I cannot say if the Bell Fibe PVR supports headphones. I've seen TV boxes that support plugging headphones into the remote. Don't think the Fibe remote has that though.

The best solution is probably to attach a Bluetooth transmitter to the TV. The reason for that is to be able to use the headphones with any TV source, including built in TV apps. They are not prohibitively expensive (but probably overpriced) and typically cost from $50 to $100. Transmitters near $100 mark generally work better with a TV and may have pass through capabilities and other useful features. The TV speaker on/off issue can be avoided by using a soundbar. Using headphones and speakers simultaneously can cause an echo effect for the headphone wearer. This can be reduced by using a soundbar with audio delay capabilities or with noise cancelling headphones. Another issue is that BT transmitters usually do not support Dolby Digital and require PCM on the digital audio input. This can be solved by switching the TV output to PCM or using the RCA outputs.
 

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instead of trying to pair it with the set top box try pairing it with the TV itself, that way ALL the sources playing thru your tv will come out of your head phones. and worst case if your TV does not have Blue Tooth capabilities, you can buy a generic blue tooth audio transmitter that supports A2D? profile and it should work
 

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You do not listen to sound from the Bell box, you listen to sound from the TV, which is hooked up to the Bell box .. My wife is hard of hearing. She's been using a Bluetooth headset for a few years. Paired to the BT transmitter hooked up to the Sound Out of the TV. Works fantastic. The BT transmitter I got has TosLink, analog, coaxial feeds.
 
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