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I wouldn't be surprised if Bell sells or merges with Shaw like XM Sirius.Another possibility would be selling to Telus.They aren't updating equipment and seem to have little interest in Satellite technology since they have put most of their efforts in Fibe technology
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Please don't take this the wrong way but I can't believe how many "glass half empty" people frequent this forum. It's almost as if you want bad things to happen so that you can say "I told you so".
 

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Canada has only enough population to support one satellite service. Bell and Shaw consumer satellite services only survived because they were subsidized for many years by the parent companies and their other operations. Shaw Direct was run on a shoestring budget for years and Bell TV has been for the past 5 years or so. Upgrades and updates will be few and far between. It's getting worse by the year as fibre networks and IPTV roll out and become increasingly more popular than satellite.

If anything happens with Bell and Shaw, one will sell or shut down their satellite division. I wouldn't be surprised if Bell already tried to sell and there were no takers. Merging them would be an extremely costly venture with diminishing returns due to a shrinking market. Technology will eventually make satellite TV obsolete in all but remote areas and unprofitable to maintain.

If anything happens with Bell and Telus, Bell will try to purchase Telus. Whether that will pass CRTC revue is debatable.
 

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Our population is much larger than New Zealand's and their Sky Satellite Television Service is very popular. Last year Sky had 705,652 satellite subscribers and 79,936 OTT subscribers, making it the largest pay television platform in New Zealand and their population is 4,850,640.

Likewise, Foxtel Satellite television in Australia (population 24,791,400 about 70% of our population) has proven to be a far more feasible option than cable television, perhaps due to the vast distances between population centres, (although Canada, which also has large distances between population centres, has a relatively high cable television penetration rate).

These 2 examples prove that large countries, like ours, with sparse populations, can run profitable satellite TV services. I would think that our country will support both Bell and Shaw satellite services for many years to come.
 

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As well, Canadian Satellite providers tag onto satellites used in the U.S. - where New Zealand and Australia have a smaller populations to share satellites.

I feel that ANZ channels also produce a lot more local content then our channels.
 

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Why would Bell add more local channels in SD and HD if they were selling or thinking of going FIBE only.

I just wish they would shut down all SD channels. Who watches SD in 2018?
 

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@NovaMan, Australia is a good comparison to Canada in population and demographics. It only has one satellite service though. Having two satellite services has hurt both companies and the level of service they provide. Shaw Direct was substandard for many years and has only recently caught up. Bell satellite lost money for many years and has been put on "hold" for the past few years in order to stem losses for a service that had reached saturation and has since lost customers and stagnated. Neither service compares with the US that has two very vibrant satellite services that continue to innovate and expand. Bell's partnership with Dish has resulted in Bell selling off resources (that rightly belong to Canadians) to Dish for "considerations." It is no longer generating tangible benefits for Canadian satellite customers. Having a single satellite service in Canada would most likely result in a more vibrant, more progressive satellite service for all Canadians.

Canadian satellite services will continue to shrink in popularity. The Canadian government has an ongoing project to connect remote regions using fibre technology. While it is true that there will always be remote areas that are not served by fibre or cable, Canada is becoming increasingly urban in nature and satellite is losing population in those areas. Satellite has a better chance of surviving with just one provider. It's not a question of if one of the existing two will be shut down, just when. Neither Shaw or Bell will support a money losing division indefinitely. In the meantime, inadequate investment in both services will drive customers away.
 

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I see that Sky in England have said they will move existing customers that use a Dish to a Fiber Feed in the coming months and years.
 

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In Australia there used to be two satellite services Austar and Foxtel, Austar was taken over by Foxtel few years back. Summat similiar could happen here in Canada down the road. cheers
 

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Its to bad SD didn't use the same system as Bell, if they did and Bell sold BTV to them.

1) not only would SD gain access to 2 more sats but they could upgrade to the Hopper &Joey(If smart)

2) they could add way more channels by re-organizing the Nimiq sats.

But I doubt that will happen.

Lets face it days of satellite is more or less over.

With the government/CRTC new regulations on having high speed internet in rural areas with in 10 years even the rural areas(excluding extreme remote areas), so even in rural areas will be "technically" available.

Cable companies are basically will turn to IPTV as have the phone companies. Shaw cable will eventually stop investing in SD and const rate on IPTV.

The only way I see Sat TV serving in Canada us if a third party buys both and invest millions with 4K technology.

If Bell was to suddenly invest in BTV by getting the Hopp
Hopper & Joey & 4K receivers from Dish/Echostar, those in rural areas and perhaps SD subs would go with BTV.

BTV is limited in Band width, but that could easily be resolved. Though it might cost them switch everything to MPEG 4(Dish did this for their eastern Arc and gave all subs MPEG 4 receivers),get ride of tons of VU/PPV channels, and terminate the agreement with Dish for the lease of 72.5 and use it themselves.
 

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OK let's look at 3 more examples:

1)Brazil. Granted Brazil's population is much bigger than ours, but they have FIVE (5) companies providing satellite TV... SKY (satellite television), Claro TV (satellite television), VIVO TV (cable/IPTV/satellite television), Oi TV (satellite television) and GVT TV (IPTV/satellite television). Like Canada, the customers are becoming smaller in numbers because of internet, but it shows one that 2 providers is not that unusual.

2)South Africa has 2 satellite providers.

3)England has 3 satellite providers and they are much more urban than Canada. Sky TV , Freesat from Sky, is a free satellite service owned by Sky plc., and Freesat. Freesat is a free satellite service created jointly by the BBC and ITV. Like Sky, it provides high definition content, digital recording and video on demand via a broadband connection.
 

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@MCIBUS
The same could be said about IPTV that it’s days are numbered. Future could be streaming services only like Netflix, Crave Tv and individual streaming channels like CBC tv to name a few. Some services like News channels or sports channels could get together and provide streaming service bypassing Bell or Rogers or any other BDU.

In my opinion until there is demand for satellite system in Canada it will be in service.
In case that satellites will be losing money they will be subsidized by other customers like OTA is now. One way or another customers in areas with no cable or IPTV will have to have satellite service available in my opinion.
 

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The US has had 5 or 6 satellite services since satellite TV was first launched. It's down to two. Even after the original shakeout that left it with two, a third launched and it failed financially, eventually being bought by Dish.

It's interesting to note that the largest satellite TV providers in Brazil is Sky, a non-Brazilian company. Another company, Claro, appears to serve many South American companies. If Canada had that type of open competition we would have more satellite providers as well. That is at least until DirecTV and Dish put our lame, substandard satellite BDUs out of business.

The UK doesn't really have 3 satellite services. Sky is the only commercial satellite TV operator. Freesat is subsidized by the BBC and ITV. It's similar in concept to the CBC and Canada's other commercial OTA networks making their OTA channels available via satellite. That's something that probably should be done in Canada but Canada's OTA broadcasters are owned by greedy companies that also own BDUs and want Canadians to pay excessive amounts for basic TV. The basic TV package mandated by the CRTC is the closest thing in Canada but in the UK it is completely FTA.

In addition to Freesat, there is Freeview, an almost identical service offered OTA and over cable. OTA TV is delivered by antenna farms that carry all services with 90% national coverage. It's nothing like Canada where there are huge gaps in OTA services in most urban areas that led to high cable TV penetration. It's interesting to note that the UK's largest cable TV provider has only 3.5 million subscribers and there are only 4 cable TV services. That's in a country of 63 million people so cable TV penetration is very low. That's most likely why satellite does so well there. It's also interesting to note that Sky UK carries a large number of US channels. It's not like Canada where a handful of government protected BDUs have formed a broadcasting cartel to keep out virtually any and all competition.
 

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3)England has 3 satellite providers and they are much more urban than Canada. Sky TV , Freesat from Sky, is a free satellite service owned by Sky plc., and Freesat. Freesat is a free satellite service created jointly by the BBC and ITV. Like Sky, it provides high definition content, digital recording and video on demand via a broadband connection.
FreeSat is nothing more than an EPG, it uses licensed Receivers to decode the EPG data, otherwise FreeSat is EXACTLY the same as FTA from the same birds, nothing more.

It is the EXACT same signal, same birds, so how can it be classed as a 2nd provider? Sky being number 1.

Then the example you use as the 3rd provider reads the same as the 2nd? FreeSat?

Do you mean FreeView? If so this uses NO Satellites at all but is in fact a Digital Terrestrial OTA Service, which carries most of the same programming as FreeSat. It is ostensibly available via an Antenna, or can be obtained via a STB connected to a Broadband Feed.

As for Channels available;

Sky TV has the most, followed by FreeSat, then FreeView.

Almost all TV's come with built-in Tuners for FreeView (some with a PVR function), and others have FreeSat or FTA Tuners, again, some with PVR capabilities.

So, England actually only has 1 Satellite Service Provider, it had a second one but that merged with Sky many years ago, AFAIK.
 

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It's interesting to note that the UK's largest cable TV provider has only 3.5 million subscribers and there are only 4 cable TV services. That's in a country of 63 million people so cable TV penetration is very low.
Correct, although to be honest, Cable TV is still relatively new in England, only becoming established in the early 90's, when in order to get into the market, cable providers had to install a brand new infrastructure. It is also worth noting that unlike Canada, the cable network is almost entirely buried, there are no overhead cable routes, no joint user poles etc. Just like the telephone network, 99% of all lines are underground, so hanging some Coaxial Cables from Pole to Pole and then taps to feed drops into houses could not be done, everything had to be dug into the ground. Sadly, they did it on the cheap when they started and it was almost all direct buried cable, so any repairs or damage involves/involved digging up roadways etc.

They also insist on using different Coax and sizes to Canadian/North American Standards for some odd reason....lol
 

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Cable TV was a largely Canadian phenomenon for many years. It was due to a combination of poor OTA service from Canadian networks combined with fringe reception availability of US channels using sophisticated OTA equipment. Most other countries didn't get cable TV in urban areas until much later when cable only TV channels were launched. Cable channel expansion in the 1980s and 1990s created the market for cable TV in urban areas and it became widely available in the US and elsewhere.

Canadian broadcasters pretty much created the market for cable TV in Canada by being so negligent in providing good OTA service for Canadians. In the 1960s, most markets in the US had 3 or 4 OTA stations, large markets many more, while Canadians had to put up with one or two stations in similarly sized markets. Not much has changed in that respect. We can still get more OTA channels from the US with better programming on better managed stations and networks. Canada remains one of the few countries in the world that makes it illegal to receive satellite services from another country. Otherwise, Canadian satellite services might not have survived the first few years.
 

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Canada remains one of the few countries in the world that makes it illegal to receive satellite services from another country. Otherwise, Canadian satellite services might not have survived the first few years.
True but that was not the reason. Our government feels we must watch "Canadian content" programming else we become Americanized.
 

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That is not true statement at all. It is illegal in the states to have another satellite service but also the same goes for every country in Europe and probably many more around the world.
 
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