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Discussion Starter #1
First of all, you have to know that I'm french, and that my english sucks! Hehe

I haven't see any thread about that, maybe there is one, if so, I'm sorry.

Good news : after bringing fiber to the node, bell is curently bringing fiber to the home ( I know, this is not a news) curently, they only sell up to 25mbps internet, they plan to sell 100mbps internet in the futur. Everywhere the homephone line is available, they will bring the fiber and the internet and tv will use this network. But at the moment, bell fibe tv can't work on the ftth(fiber to the home) network... It's only work on the fttn(fiber to the node) network.

Bad news : the new construction will only be connect to the fiber network... It mean the phone line won't be available... Phone services will also use fiber network. One of the very first reason I prefer Bell, is because I hate Voip like videotron! Now, bell will use almost the same technology... A modem with a battery, and a phone number associated with an Ip adress...

What do you think of this?
 

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Sorry Paskal but I really don't believe what you are saying.

Bell has not brought FTTN to many places let alone FTTH. FTTH for existing customers would cost Bell billions and that's billions with a B.

It cost Bell Aliant hundred of millions to bring FTTH to Frederiction which is only about 60,000 homes. At $750 to $1,000 per home, the cost to upgrade five to ten million homes would require massive capital expenditure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is not planned to be available everywhere the next year. This is a very long process. I shouldn't say to every houses with phone line... Maybe it won't happen in nunavut... lol...
At first they plan to implant this in every big cities, then surounding area and etc. I worked for bell, I left a week ago, and I can say that right now, FTTN is available in some village far from civilisation, like "Métabechuan" I received a formation about that couple days before I left.
 

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I'm with Hugh. The only thing you can trust from Bell, is that they will/do lie. I'm quite shocked no one has brought forth a class-action suit against their "Fibe" service...which really has nothing to do with "Fibre". All they did was remove an 'r'. ADSL2+ speeds have been in the neighbourhoods for years.

Bell loses my vote for Internet service due to the fact that they STILL charge a modem rental fee- even if you own and use your own modem. This, to me, is fraudulent as there is nothing in any modem that ties it to Bell's service. All that is required is a street address.
 

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I work for Bell and I usually point out that it's Fib with an e
Some of the guys I work with don't pay rental fee and supply their own modem.
I've also done installs for high speed customers coming back to bell where they are supplying their own modem as well.
 

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fiber optics in my backyard ..nnnoooooooooooo

In my area in Ottawa a bunch o trucks apeared the other day from bell and Tandent networking. They were installing a 10 inch dia black semi flexible pipe around the housing blocks. I assume this tube will someday be filled with fiber optic cables going direct to the home.

any comments , this is in an area of existing homes about 20 years old with copper wire service. Is bell placing its optic to usrp rogers and old copper ?

It will most likley take then a year to get the whole thing done , its big grimmy and messy , everyones backyard will be EXCAVATED for the new FO
 

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A whole bunch of guys are training right now from a Co in Mississauga, for FTTH Installation, so it must be rolling out soon, in the GTA in a big way.
 

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Has Bell not said they will be doing new developments FTTH? If they were going to rebuild the GTA is FTTH they would surely have announced it, because it would cost millions and millions of dollars and the financial markets would need to know about it.
 

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Last night Discovery's Daily Planet did a piece on Fibe, but confused it almost totally with FTTH. FTTH is available in some dedicated areas, like new developments or "trial towns", but as mentioned in this thread, they'll need to spend billions to change the "last mile" to fibre from copper.

I really disliked they way the Daily Planet piece spread a lot of misinformation about Fibe and about Cable. When I explained what Rogers Cable and Fibe could actually do, my wife said "why would they air all that incorrect information?".
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good news! Yesterday there was couple of bell's truck on the street next to mine. I asked them if they were installing FTTH, and guess the answer! Yes! And a couple of weeks ago, I received a flyer from a bell's contractor because they were chopping branches around electric pole!
 

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Last night Discovery's Daily Planet did a piece on Fibe, but confused it almost totally with FTTH. FTTH is available in some dedicated areas, like new developments or "trial towns", but as mentioned in this thread, they'll need to spend billions to change the "last mile" to fibre from copper.

I really disliked they way the Daily Planet piece spread a lot of misinformation about Fibe and about Cable. When I explained what Rogers Cable and Fibe could actually do, my wife said "why would they air all that incorrect information?".
Why would Daily Planet air incorrect information? Because Daily Planet is on Discovery Canada which is owned by CTV which is owned by BCE, the owner of Bell Canada. BCE wants Bell Canada and their technology to seem superior to Rogers' tech so BCE simply uses their newly-acquired media company (CTV) to push whatever message BCE wants.

Aren't you glad we have the CRTC looking after the consumer's best interests? :rolleyes:
 

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At $1000 / home, 10 million homes, 10 billion dollars amortized over 10 years is only 1 billion per year. If you look at BCE financial statements that's close to what they spend now in wireline CapEx ($1-2 billion/year). Bell has spent the last 10 years preparing to replace their copper plant with fiber from the CO to pedestals and in some cases up to the last distribution point. The final step will be to create an all encompassing fiber plant by replacing the last segment of copper cabling from the pedestals and last distribution point to customer premises (FTTH). In telco context FTTH is considered a "5G" network for wireline service, where ISDN is "1G", ADSL2/2+ is "2G", VDSL2 is "3G", and Gigabit DSL (currently being standardized) is "4G". Once plant is 100% fiber there is relatively little expenditures in future construction costs.

Edit: Even cable companies are evaluating their entry into FTTH markets http://www.scribd.com/doc/47777278/FTTH-Challenges-Rogers

This from a January 20 2011 Bell Aliant news release:
Bell Aliant, with the support of the Nova Scotia government, has announced a $55 million investment to expand FibreOP, its fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) network, to approximately 160,000 homes and businesses in the Halifax Regional Municipality.

The FTTH network for Nova Scotia was introduced last spring with Bell Aliant's $15 million investment to launch FibreOP services first in Sydney. This brings the total FTTH investment in Nova Scotia to over $70 million to serve approximately 190,000 homes and businesses.
$55 million / 160,000 homes averages to only $344 per home. Bell Aliant isn't even paying the full cost. According to the 2006 census, HRM (Halifax Regional Municipality) has a regional density of 67.9/sq km compared to 3,972/sq km for Toronto. That's 58.5x less dense (HRM has a large rural component)! And they commit to cover half the population! So as you can see the costs of deploying 5G wireline networks in high population centres are not so high at all, the most important part is government creating incentive for operators to expand their fiber networks more hurriedly via subsidies and regulation (e.g. splitting retail from wholesale, affordable leasing of existing and planned cable conduit and utility poles and granting rights of way). This model is used in most of the industrialised world, including NS/NB/PEI, and it works!
 
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