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Ugh, i wish they would hurry up. I'm sick of NAT and subnetting. I want every light switch in my house to have a public IP !!
 

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I have been using IPV6 through a tunnel which of course slows things up a bit.

When will DHC be up on V6 as well as V4 ?

I also wonder when the big ISPs like Rogers will offer V6
 

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bigger than Y2K in a few years
It may be sooner than that. Latest reports I've been hearing is all of IPv4 will be gone in less than a year. All the more reason for people to get moving to IPv6. If your ISP doesn't yet support it, use a tunnel broker. Also, I've heard that Teksavey will be supporting IPv6 shortly.
 

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I also wonder when the big ISPs like Rogers will offer V6
I've heard that Telus may be doing something. I haven't heard anything about Rogers, though I wouldn't be surprised if they try it with that 4G experiment they're running in Ottawa. 4G phones will need IPv6, as they'll be using VoIP for voice. With VoIP, you want the phones to be able to communicate directly, which NAT doesn't support. You also pick up mobility benefits, so you can start a call on your home WiFi network, shift to 4G when you leave home and back on WiFi at work. IPv6 mobility supports this, but it's difficult to do with IPv4.
 

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I had to disable IPv6 on my Win7 PCs. There are major speed problems between Win7 PCs on a small home LAN. Wonder when MS is going to enable real networking on their O/S products and drop the broken crap they are peddling now.
 

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I can see some interim "address conservation measures" coming up. E.g. at work (Environment Canada) every desktop has a publically routable address. This is not necessary. With the exception of a few mail/ftp/web servers, we're firewalled to NAT-equivalancy anyways. Setting up an unauthorized public server on your desktop is one sure way to get fired. So why bother with public IP addresses for each desktop? NATing our workplace would release over a thousand IP addresses right there.

If every workplace did the same, we'd have a little bit more breathing room. I'm not suggesting that it would be a permanent fix, but even a few months' breathing room will help.

The big issue is what do we do with IPV4. IPV6/IPV4 can co-exist peacefully, which is IPV6's biggest enemy. Many people will not want to spend the money to migrate to IPV6 if they don't absolutely have to. Excepting for the 1% geek population, most people will be perfectly happy with life behind a NAT. Nothing short of a total shutdown of IPV4 will get IPV6 adopted. It's a chicken-and-egg problem...
  • The mass of average users won't go IPV6 until all their favourite websites/etc are IPV6
  • Most companies won't spend money enabling IPV6 if they can get by with IPV4
There WILL be calls to shut down IPV4. Given the last-minute resistance to the digital TV switch, I fear that things could get ugly with an enforced IPV6 shutdown. If a few countries shut down IPV4, I can see some other countries squatting on the now-unused IPV4 addresses, Voila, IPV4 address shortage "solved".
 

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Many companies already used NAT. The only place I've worked that didn't was IBM, where I had 5 real world addresses (1 for my own computer and 4 for testing with my work). Outside of the desktop, there are many reasons why companies would need a real IPv4 address. However, we're heading into a world where we'll want access to stuff at home and that requires non NAT addresses. While it is possible to configure firewalls to work around NAT, that's very limited in what can be done. Also, as I've mentioned before, 4G phones will need IPv6 in order to deliver full function. In the U.S., the federal government is really driving IPv6. They already have in place a policy of purchasing only IPv6 capable equipment and they recently passed legislation requiring all publicly available web sites to be IPv6 capable in the not too distant future. Smart companies are also ensuring new equipment is IPv6 ready. Also, as IPv6 becomes common, IPv4 will fade away, as with most software, when contacting a dual stack IPv6/IPv4 site, IPv6 is preferred. Already, when I connect to the various Google sites, including YouTube etc., I connect via IPv6. Also, there are already some countries that have mostly switched to IPv6, as there are not enough IPv4 addresses for them.

Also, interm measures such as NAT break some protocols, including authenticated headers in IPSec VPNs.
 

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A big part of the problem is that early players took huge blocks of address spaces they don't need. That was done, in part, because the internet was originally intended for only US military, government and educational use. That Nortel class A block is a perfect example. (Nortel probably got one due to their hi-tech ties with AT&T and/or US military and government contracts.) There are lots more like this. IMHO, many of those should be split into class B and class C blocks for other companies. The US government and military has several class A blocks where one could probably be shared. OTOH, I don't know anyone who wants to try and take something away from the US military. ;)
 

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^^^^
Regardless of how much the big companies give up, there still won't be enough IPv4 addresses to go around. With 32 bits, you can only have a bit over 4 billion addresses, before you start deducting unusable addresses. Just for starters, "class A" blocks 0, 10 and 127 are not available, then nothing in 192.168.x.x, 172.16.x.x - 172.31.x.x and that 169.254.x.x (IIRC) block, which are used for local networking. Then we get to the blocks used for multicasts and experimental purposes. On the other hand, with IPv6, the number of addresses available works out to about 2^125 or 4.25 x 10^37. An ISP is supposed to give a customer 2^64 addresses, which is the number of IPv4 addresses squared! In fact, my own personal subnet is about a trillion times the number of possible 32 bit addresses. So, bottom line, the only long term solution to the address problem is IPv6. Any attempt to extend IPv4 is simply a dead end hack.
 

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Agreed.

My guess is that we will have an "internet shortage" somewhere between 2012 to 2014. It may not last that long but human nature, what it is, will mean that a crisis will have to occur before the problem gets resolved.
 

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Jamesk, "They already have in place a policy of purchasing only IPv6 capable equipment and they recently passed legislation requiring all publicly available web sites to be IPv6 capable in the not too distant future."

I presume you mean our Fed not their Fed. <grin>

What legislation was this? Was it just a paragraph in some other bill rather than being an act on its own?
 

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When IPv6 finally becomes the standard I'm not looking forward to asking users for their IP addresses, pinging IPv6 addresses for troubleshooting purposes, or entering IPv6 addresses in UNC/http paths.
 

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I presume you mean our Fed not their Fed.
I was referring to the U.S. government.

From this article:

Key Directives for IPv6 Adoption

At yesterday's second panel that focused on Federal efforts on IPv6, US CIO Vivek Kundra unveiled the U.S. Office of Management and Budget's memorandum to all CIOs of Executive Departments and Agencies of the US government that contained key actionable directives for IPv6 deployment and adoption.

These Federal government directives can be summarized as:

1. All agencies across the US Government must deploy IPv6 on their public facing websites before September 30, 2012.

2. Agencies must upgrade their entire internal infrastructure to native IPv6 before September 30, 2014

3. Agencies must designate an IPv6 Transition Manager

4. The equipment that agencies procure for networked IT must comply with requirements for the completeness and quality of their IPv6 capabilities.
 

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When IPv6 finally becomes the standard I'm not looking forward to asking users for their IP addresses, pinging IPv6 addresses for troubleshooting purposes, or entering IPv6 addresses in UNC/http paths.
I can relate to that. Hopefully everything will get a proper DNS entry along with an IPv6 address.
 

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The majors ISPs own big block of IPs. I bet they just recycle them so when they start running out all they will do is switch new customers to IPv6 and maybe existing customers who need to replace busted modem.
 

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^^^^
They already do recycle addresses and have for years, by using DHCP. Unfortunately, some ISPs are using NAT & RFC 1918 addresses, instead of real world addresses for some customers. That's the case with smart phones on Rogers. When ISPs finally provide IPv6 addresses, there's no reason for not making them avaialable to everyone. The limitation will be the customer's equipment, as older routers don't support IPv6. However, Linux, Windows and Mac have supported it for years. Even my smart phone supports it. Modems might need upgrading, again depending on model. In the mean time, tunneling IPv6 over IPv4 is an option that I'm currently using. Perahps Rogers will have IPv6 available in that LTE test they're running in Ottawa, as LTE and 4G phones will pretty much require it.
 

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So, what now?

Are ISP's (such as Shaw and Rogers) actually going to assign IPv6 addresses to their customers (which would require upgrading Docsis2 modems to D3)?

Are router manufacturers going to release IPv6 compatible firmwares, or will they just force everybody (and i mean everybody) to buy a new router?

Will everybody need to replace their mobile handset, which is currently only IPv4 capable?

There's an easy way and a hard way to perform a transition such as this, and everyone seems to be opting for the hard way. At present, my ISP, cable modem, router, gaming consoles, and mobile devices are all IPv4 capable only, with no apparent plans to add IPv6 capabilities. From what I gather, this is also the case for most people.
 
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