Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
It took about 10 years to transition from analog to ATSC. At that pace, it could take until 2026 to transition to ATSC3. It does look like ATSC2 is going to be skipped.

The other question to ask is whether there will be any demand for ATSC3. OTA stations are being squeezed out of the UHF spectrum used by ATSC and VHF is less than ideal. In a few years, there may not even be enough spectrum to implement ATSC3 in major markets. In addition, younger viewers are ignoring traditional broadcasting in favour of streaming. Even traditional TV viewers are opting for OTT services. By 2026, OTA may be obsolete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
The last set I purchased doesn't have a tuner. I use an HTPC with PVR software and a PC tuner to record OTA. Recordings can be watched using media players or on smart TVs with network playback capabilities. DLNA enabled TV tuners such as a HDHomerun can be used to watch live TV using DLNA media players or on smart TVs with DLNA enabled apps. That way the tuner can be upgraded as needed at a much lower price than replacing the entire TV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
The use of ATSC 3.0 in congested US markets is almost a given. Most Canadian broadcasters would rather shut down their transmitters than spend money on another conversion. The only exception might be the Toronto market.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
I think the bridge between 5G and wifi is to roll out 5G to residential neighborhoods and use it to provide wireless internet. Individual wifi would then be provided using the new AX protocol the supersedes AC. 5G would replace wiring from the street to the home. Since 5G and AX are slated to use high bandwidth, low power frequencies above 6GHz its a good match. Routers could also be used to extend or implement low power 5G inside the home. 5G is not limited to frequencies above 6GHz and AX will continue to use lower AC frequencies but the bands above 6GHz provide opportunities for new services and much higher bandwidth. By the time that happens, using ATSC broadcasting (in any form) will be close to obsolete as it could easily be replaced by 5G. The exception would be areas underserved by 5G.

ATSC3.0 provides a mechanism for consumer to broadcaster communication that can send information about consumer use of their signals back to the source. That would use the internet and wifi. It could be used to accumulate data on audience size and demographics and, possibly, also individual programming such as targeted ads. Google is probably already working on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
I agree. Most Canadian broadcasters would like to abandon OTA transmissions almost entirely and just maintain flagship stations in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. The only reason they haven't is that they would lose simsub rights on TV services. CRTC regulations will also need to change before ATSC 3.0 is even considered. Current limitations on sub-channels make it uneconomical to multicast ATSC signals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
It's probably possible to encrypt OTA signals, although historically they have been "free" in North America. In certain countries, like England, people have to pay for OTA.
It's not only possible to encrypt OTA it has been done. OTA pay TV services were available in the Detroit area and others. It use a scheme similar to analog encryption for early cable pay TV services and was susceptible to widespread pirating.

While it's true that UK residents must pay a broadcast tax for OTA it's not a subscription model like NA. The benefits of the UK model are substantial when compared the NA subscription model. They receive what amounts to one of our low tier (~$70) cable package through OTA or satellite at a fraction of the cost, under $25/mo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
The most likely scenario is that ATSC 3.0 technology will be leveraged to provide "targeted" ads. The channels will be free to watch but ads will be even more creepy than they already are.

Another possibility is that broadcasters will lobby for and get laws passed to geoblock cross-border channels on ATSC 3.0 receivers. I expect Canadian broadcasters would apply first. Implementation would likely require an update to the US-Canada copyright treaty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
What is technically feasible and what will be done are different issues. It is technically feasible to make ATSC 3.0 receivers block reception or substitute content based on location or internet availability. We will see how broadcasters act. If such measures are taken, it will be to increase broadcaster revenue. It also raises the possibility of black market devices to bypass broadcasters actions that block or modify reception.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
The chances of that happening is slim to none (too costly, too difficult to implement, too easy to circumvent), and with cross border internet shopping, almost impossible to control.
Never underestimate the power of the studios to force copy protection and other restrictions on hardware manufacturers. Sometimes they are one and the same company, like Sony, and can enforce licensing restrictions on the technology they own. They did it with DVD and Blu-ray, plus they made Netflix enforce geoblocking on their streaming service. So far, the FCC has prevented OTA broadcasters from putting copy protection on their broadcasts but that could change. Cross border shopping won't make any difference either. Most hardware for the North American market is almost identical apart from a few firmware tweaks for localization and apps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
It's not about the equipment, it's about content which is mostly owned by the big studios. They enforce copy protection and other restrictions by refusing to sell content to distributors and broadcasters that refuse to impose their will on consumers. We already went through this once with ATSC 1.0. Some OTA broadcasters tried to put copy protection flags on their signals. The FCC stepped in and prohibited it. That could change if studios and broadcasters lobby politicians to enact laws that treat OTA broadcasting like other sources under the DMCA. You are correct in Canada being a minor market but it is very lucrative due to the high prices Canadians are willing to pay for copyrighted material. The studios have already tried and were partially successful at getting Canada and many other countries to implement DMCA-like laws. It could happen again. Any OTA scheme would be international in nature, at least in NA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Yes it is, but you originally stated that studios / content creators could force hardware manufacturers to enforce ATSC 3.0 copy protection. I disagreed because obviously that is legally impossible, unless the FCC steps in and changes some laws.
TiVo forced cable companies to change their hardware with a patent lawsuit so it's definitely not impossible. Large corporations like Sony have lots of patents and lots of resources to enforce them. That's in addition to market leverage. The FCC does not create or change laws. They create and enforce regulations. The government creates and changes laws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Compared to TiVo, it's a bargain. It's comparable in price to Plex and Schedules Direct, neither of which provide hardware. A significant portion of their fees go to guide information providers such as Tribune Media.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top