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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody want to take a guess at what that last sentance is all about?? Apple is supposed to be on the Blu-Ray side of the fence.


Apple Unveils Final Cut Studio
- Apr 17, 2005 03:30 PM (PR Newswire)

Major Upgrades of Final Cut Pro, Motion and DVD Studio Pro;
Introducing Soundtrack Pro


LAS VEGAS, April 17 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- NAB -- Apple(R) today
unveiled Final Cut(R) Studio, the ultimate HD video production suite
that features Final Cut Pro(R) 5, a major upgrade to the Emmy
award-winning editing software for DV, SD, HD and film. Final Cut
Studio also includes state-of-the- art tools that complement Final
Cut Pro 5 such as Soundtrack(R) Pro, a revolutionary new audio
editing and sound design application that makes video projects sound
as good as they look; Motion 2, the world's first real-time motion
graphics application with GPU accelerated 32-bit float rendering; and
DVD Studio Pro(R) 4, the first commercially available DVD authoring
software that burns high definition DVDs to the latest HD DVD
specification.
 

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It means they will offer SOFTWARE to support the creation of HD product. Including on HD-DVD: Look at the logo

This is SOFTWARE to produce HD (which can reside on MANY formats). Since HD-DVD will be a format, and Apple is in the market of producing things for those in the A/V production industry niche, it makes perfect sense that software supporting HD-DVD production would be offered.

That is completely different from putting an HD-DVD drive in an Apple hardware product. At this point, Apple has said they will be selling hardware with Blu-Ray drives. Presumably this implies that some hardware HD-DVD solution may be forthcoming. Or perhaps they'll rely on 3rd party suppliers of upcoming HD-DVD-R/RW drives?

This is not an abortion debate. Being pro-Blu-Ray doesn't mean you must be anti-HD-DVD.

Gary
 

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I don't know Gary....I think you're putting way too little significance on this. What this software does is CREATE (author) an HD-DVD disc. Very specifically NOT a Blu-Ray disc...an HD-DVD disc. Pretty strange for a card-carrying Blu-Ray group member, wouldn't you say?

Final Cut Pro can certainly be used to create audio and HD video that can be used with both standards, but DVD Studio Pro can only author an HD-DVD disc. Strange.
 

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Or the reporter does not know any better and just decided to write high-definition DVD's with DVD implying nothing about HD-DVD. They were simply careless and it probably means nothing.

On the other hand. Whatever content is created with the software will likely be able to be burned to either Blu-Ray or HD-DVD with the proper authoring software. I.e., it could make an MPEG-4 that subsequently could be burned to either device.
 

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My apologies.

However, I looked through the site and there is no mention of burn formats. It seems that they use HD DVD to imply HD-DVD AND Blu-Ray (or just Blu-Ray?).

The marketing argument against Blu-Ray has always been that HD-DVD sounds like the natural upgrade from DVD. It appears that Apple is catering to those who do not know better and likely simplifying the HD format war to not confuse things in their marketing.

I wonder if this is the first win for HD-DVD? The software probably supports both but their marketing is riddled with "HD DVD" which implies HD-DVD only.

Additionally, if Blu-Ray wins the war, will it become known as HD DVD by the consumer base?
 

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JohnnyG said:
I don't know Gary....I think you're putting way too little significance on this. What this software does is CREATE (author) an HD-DVD disc. Very specifically NOT a Blu-Ray disc...an HD-DVD disc. Pretty strange for a card-carrying Blu-Ray group member, wouldn't you say?

Final Cut Pro can certainly be used to create audio and HD video that can be used with both standards, but DVD Studio Pro can only author an HD-DVD disc. Strange.
Hey, I can undermine my position better than that! ;)

Apple's announcement about joining the BDA

You can see implications that may sell Blu-Ray hardware, but the announcement doesn't really commit them to that. It is really about supporting the format, and giving Mac users support for Blu-Ray. That could mean tools, not hardware.

I am always one to try to keep speculation/implication and fact separate. I didn't this time. Shame on me. This is no more certain than the launch PS/3 base unit being a Blu-Ray movie player.

Apple's a key producer of software for the industry professionals. It would absolutely ludicrous of them to enter into a format war. They should, and I believe they certainly will, support both formats. And will probably release hardware for both too.

I suspect Apple is already a member of the DVD Forum, and hence already had formal access to the HD-DVD specs. They joined the BDA to gain the same access to info on Blu-Ray.

This IS significant for HD-DVD, no doubt about that. And the BDA have once again lost out on an opportunity. I'm sure if there was an official BD-ROM logo, Apple would have put that in the graphic too.

But, Apple supporting both formats really makes their involvement a push. Their influence on the mass market (either computing or A/V) was minor at best.

Gary
 

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Apple playing both sides

Read the last paragraph from this Apple press release at NAB 2005. They are hedging their bets....

News from NAB 2005

Apple continues to lead the industry in the adoption of high definition video by demonstrating a complete HD video production and playback platform at NAB (booth #1902) this week. Apple will showcase Mac OS X version 10.4 "Tiger" and QuickTime 7, which includes support for the H.264 codec, along with Final Cut Studio, the ultimate HD video production suite.

"With H.264 at the core of Tiger and the launch of Final Cut Studio, we've created the industry's first completely integrated platform to capture, edit, playback and burn high definition video," said Philip Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing.

QuickTime 7, featuring the H.264 codec, allows users to playback pristine quality high definition video on today's shipping computers with no additional hardware required. H.264 has been adopted by both the DVD Forum and Blu-ray Disc Association for the next generation of high capacity, high definition DVDs. Apple will release QuickTime 7 in conjunction with the release of Mac OS X "Tiger" on April 29.

Final Cut Studio, Apple's ultimate HD video production suite, centers around Final Cut Pro 5, a major upgrade to the Emmy award-winning editing software for DV, SD, HD and film. Final Cut Studio features state-of-the-art tools that complement Final Cut Pro 5, including Soundtrack Pro, a revolutionary new audio editing and sound design application that makes video projects sound as good as they look; Motion 2, the world's first real-time motion graphics application with GPU accelerated 32-bit float rendering; and DVD Studio Pro 4, the first commercially available DVD authoring software that burns high definition DVDs to the latest HD DVD specification.

Apple is committed to both emerging high definition DVD standards--Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD. Apple is an active member of the DVD Forum which developed the HD DVD standard, and last month joined the Board of Directors of the Blu-ray Disc Association.
 
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